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October 15, 1967 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-15

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'AGE THREE

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

DIFFER DRAMATICALLY:
Multinational Conference verify Death

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DAILY O"FFICIAL BULLETIN

Officer will conduct group meetings to Holt, Rinehart and Winston. N.Y.C.
interest present seniors and grad. stu- - Any degree in any discipline for
dents in For. Serv. Careers. Contact Sales and manusc eliciting.
Bureau to sign up. Students below sr.

level are also welcome.

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Debates Education Crisis

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (CPS)-
Is there a world crisis in education,
and if so what can be done about
it?
Nearly 170 educators from more
than 50 nations met here last
weekend at a conference sponsored
by the United States government
and private foundations to seek
answers to those questions. There
was little agreement on either
question, though the report of the
conference co-chairman, Cornell
University President James Per-
kins, made substantial recommen-
dations which will be presented to
President Johnon later this year.
Views of the crisis differed dra-
matically.
Changing Environment
Perkins saw it as the fact that
"educational systems have been
unable to keep pace in the last
decade with their rapidly changing
environments."
Another delegate, Adam Curle of
Harvard University, described it
succinctly as "too many students,
too few teachers, and not enough
money."
Others noted a wide diversity of
problems among nations, suggested
that there was no single crisis, but
rather crises, and asked that each
country be permitted to find its
own solutions and that the con-
ference not make universal pre-
scriptions
Through working groups on top-
ics such as management, technol-
ogy, resources, and teacher supply,
delegates sought to make the rec-
ommendations on a strategy and
specific measures for meeting the
crisis-or crisis-by national and
international action.
Society's Aims
A strong emphasis was placed on
the educational problems of devel-
oping nations and their need to
tailor education more effectively
to society's aims and needs.
Technology as a means of reliev-
ing shortage received a great deal
of attention. Delegates agreed that
"programmed instruction, team
teaching, film, radio and television
will be increasingly the tools of
the trade."
Dr. Philip H. Coombs, director
of the International Institute for
Educational Planning, saw teach-
ers themselves as the cause for
slowness in , accepting the new
media for teaching. Coombs, whose
book "The World Educational

Crisis-A Systems Analysis," form- developing needs rather than be-j
ed the base of conference discus- coming an inert item to be pro-
sion, said: "Teachers are convinced cessed."
that there's something special In one of the highlights of the
about being in a classroom exposed convention, President Johnson ad-
to a conventional approach. This I dressed the delegates on Sunday.
is sheer nonsense." - He urged that the conference call
Education for Students on the UN to institute an "inter-
national education year."
Students received a share ofnaialeutonyr.
conference attention when one Deplores War Expense
delegate stated "the individual stu- In his speech, Johnson deplored
dent is what we are concerned the atrocities and expense of war,
about, not the teachers. That stating, "In this century, man has
means that education must be spent literally trillions of dollars
custom-built for him." on the machinery of death and
Perkins declared, "students war . . . In those years, nearly 100
themselves must become a more million people have died in the
active part of the educational pro- maiming and disease and starva-
cess." He stressed the value of tion which come with war."
independent work and said that Although he mentioned World
students should be "prepared to War II, Johnson made no specific
use the institution for their own reference to the Viet Nam war.
World N7,ews Roundup

By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - A statehouse
panel resumed negotiations to end
a steel haulers' rebellion yester-
day, but two parties in the dis-
pute said they want no part of
further talks.
"We're not going down to the
state office building and negotiate
again," said Daniel Berger, an at-
torney for the strikers.
And the head of the National
Steel Carriers Association said it
would be illegal for trucking com-
panies to negotiate on a key issue
-the time truckers wait at steel
mill loading docks.
HONG KONG-Chinese Com-,
munists added 21 more to their
two-day terrorist bomb toll of
dead and wounded yesterday,
kidnapped a British official and
vowed to continue violence until
Hong Kong's British. government
"admits its crimes, bows its head
in apology, and complies with all
our demands."
* * *
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -
Hungary and Czechoslovakia, in
a joint communique yesterday
"agreed on the necessity to con-
vene a world conference of Com-
munist and workers' parties."
"The conference would discuss

fundamental questions of a
further course of action of all
revolutionary and anti-imperial-
ist forces," the communique said.
* * *
BUDAPEST -- The Hungarian
radio announced yesterday that
American author Barbara Garson
has withdrawn her play, "Mac-
bird," on short notice. It was to
have been broadcast last night.
The radio quoted the Hungarian
Copyright Bureau as saying Miss
Garson withdrew the performing
rights for the play, described as.a
"vitriolic political satire on United
States public affairs," because
"she was afraid European aud-
iences would misinterpret the
real aims and essence of this po-
litical skit."
* * *
VATICAN CITY - The Roman
Catholic world laymen's congress
demonstrated overwhelming sen-
timent yesterday in favor of per-
mitting Catholic couples to de-
cide themselves whether to use
artificial contraception for birth
control.
The congress of 2,500 laymen
from around the world broke out
in applause as delegates reported
that the majority of participants
in three workshop groups favored
leaving the decision on artificial
contraceptives to married couples.

Of Guevara
WASHINGTON P) - United
States officials were reported yes-
terday to have received what they,
consider positive proof that the
Bolivian government's claim of
having slain guerrilla leader Er-,
nesto Che Guevara is true.
The Bolivian army originally an-
nounced that the will-o-the-wisp
insurrectionist, once a top deputy
to Cuba's Fidel Castro, was shot in
a clash with soldiers lastSunday.
Washington spokesmen said then
they were inclined to believe the
Bolivian government reports. But
recent La Paz dispatches have
' tended to throw some mystery over
the affair.
A small group of United States
specialists have been training Bol-
vian forces in anti-guerrilla oper-
ations and were reported in La Paz
to have been in a position to make
an independent verification of the
Bolivian claim.
It was understood that the re-
sults, including fingerprint iden-
tification, have arrived in Wash-
ington and that responsible Unit-
ed States authorities are now ful-
ly satisfied the body shown by the
Bolivians was that of the Argen-
tine-born Guevara.
Known Guevara fingerprints for
cross-checking against those from.
the body were said to have been
available from a number of files
including some from Argentina,
Chile and Mexico.
The La Paz government's ver-
sion is that Guevara died of
wounds from Sunday's battle in
the wild Andean foothills about
300 miles southeast of the Boliv-
ian capital.
Newsmen were taken to Valle-
grande to view the body, and ob-
servers said it bore a strong re-
semblance to Guevara.
However some questions have
arisen because the body was not
brought to La Paz but was cre-
mated rather suddenly without'
prior announcement. And there
have been conflicting accounts of
the manner of his death.
United Statese observers are in-
clined to attribute Bolivian pro-
cedures to the pressures imme-
diately faced by officials there
rather than to any effort to cover
up.
From the United States stand-
point, lingering doubts in the pub-
lic mind about the fate of Gue-
vara-a hero to Latin American
Communist revolutionaries -
could open a fertile. field for fu-
ture Communist propagandists.

acpefopubm~dlulcaion. For more
information call 764-9270. Final Student Tea at the home of
----__ President and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher on
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 5 Wed.. Oct. 18. from 4-6 p.m. Special
honored guests: President-Designate
! Robben WV. Fleming and Mrs. Fleming.
.e All students are cordially invited.
,,TEducation Juniors and Seniors: Ap-
________plications for the School of Education
School of Music Concert - University Scholarships for the Winter Term 1968
of Michigan Arts Chorale and Ann (II), will be available in room 2000
Arbor Symphony Orchestra - Emil University High School on Nov. 1.
Holz, Conductor and Marynard Klein. Applicants must have high scholastic
Conductor: Ann Arbor High school standing, financial need, and teaching
Auditorium, 4:00 p.m. potential. Both the application and
Airi ,: _m the interview are to be completed
..Professional Theatre Program - E during November.
gene Ionesco's Exit the King: Lydia Dotori Examination for: Miriam
Mendelssohn Theatre. Matinee 2.30 Doctoral Examination for: Miriam
p.m.; Evening performance, 8:00 p.m.fDcra Eamiatina. or:Miry
School of Music Concert - Sigma Al- Haruko Fukami, MedicinaiChemistry,
pha Iota Musicale: School of Music Thesis: "Amides of 4-Quinolyamina
Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m. Acids as Chemotherapeutic Agents,"
Recial Hll. :30 ~m.Monday, October 16. at 2:00 p.m., in
Room 2525 Chemistry Building, Chair-
Saul of Music Degree Recital --,man: J. H. Burckhalter.
,amue Lamr, (rgan: Hill Auditoiriu

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
galendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not

Evening College Lecture - Dr. Richard
Mitchell. The University of Michigan,
"Is Peace Possible in the Middle East?"
- Rackham Amphitheater, 7:30 to 9:30
p.m.
Department of Architecture - Ralph
Cowan, Head Edinburgh College of Art,
Scotland, "21st Century Architecture,"
Angell Halt "B" 8:00 p.m.
General Notices

Dept. of State, Office of Equal Em-
ployment Opportunity, Wash. D.C. -
Mr. Wright will be at the Bureau to
talk to members of any minority
group from 9-5. No. appt. necessary.
Will give info. on opportunities with
Dept. of State and rel. agencies such
as AID. Undergrads, Srs., and Grads
welcome.
..Central Intelligence Agency -- See
Tuesdays listing.
Michigan Consolidate Gas Company,
Detroit, Mich. - M & F BA/MA Econ.,
Math and Chem, for Computing. Per-
sonnel, Product., and Program Learn-
ing.
ORGANIZATI
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
' NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB,

ON NOTICES

01"Wavoom wat M. I-IMR4MMO.M.W"MI

olulLuII, "ia .111 1U~V1L1
8:30 p.m.
EVENTS MONDAY:
College of Engineering and Interna-
tional Scientific Radio Union Annual
Symposium - Rackham Building, 9:00
a.m.
School of Music Conference - "Sev-
enth Annual Conference on Organ
Music": Morning session, Hill Auditor-
ium. 9:30 a.m.; Afternoon Session. Hill
Auditorium. 1:30 and 2:30 p.m.; Univer-
sity Symphony Orchestra with Marilyn
Mason and Preston Rackholt, Organ-
ists: Hill Auditorium. 4:15 p.m.; Uni-
versity Symphony Band with Robert
Clark. Organist: Hill Auditorium, 8:30
p.m.
Senate Assembly meeting, 100 Hutch-
chins Hall. 3:30 p.m.
I AGENDA
1. Minutes of the meeting of Aug.
21, 1967 and Sept. 18, 1967.
2. Announcements.
3. Appointment to fill vacancy on Re-
search Policy Committee - 3-year
term.
4. Autonomy Issue - Vice President
Pierpont.
5. Perquisites for Librarians.
6. Regularizing of composition and
procedures of Assembly committees.
7. Bylaw Review.
8. Plans for Fall Senate Meeting.
William W. Cook Lectures on Ameri-
can Institutions - "The Governance of
the Schools" - Francis Keppel, "The
Facts We. Face" {Lecture 1): Business
Administration Building, 4:15 p.m.
University of Michigan Extension
Service and Michigan State University

Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Canadian Public Service Commis-
sion test given Tues. Evening, Oct. 17.
Contact Bureau for details.
American Oil will be. interviewing
at Chemistry Placement Oct. 17 for
Econ and Math maJors interested in
Compt., Mktg. REs., Pub.Rei., Purchas.,
Trans. and Programming.
Master of Arts in Teaching, Trinity
College, Wash. D.C. - Inner City
Teachers, 12 mo. leading to MAT, con-
centration in Engl and Amer. Hist.,
SMiller Analogies and GRE scores req.,
commitment to teaching in the inner
city,
City of Los Angeles, Calif. - Traffic
Engineering Assistant, BSE, interview-
ing possible, call Bureau for applic.
details. Principal Traffic Engr., BSE
and 6 yrs. professional traffic engrg.
exper.
Bell Aerosystems, Textron Comany,
Buffalo, N.Y. - Openings in Mktg.,
Syst. Engrg., Structural Engrg., Serv.,
and Admin.. Elect. Mechan and Elec-
tronic., Lab. and Test., Rocket and
Propulsion, Manuf. Engr.. Project and
Syst. Mgmnt., Product Assurance, Re-
search, and Finance.
For placement interviews, Call 764-
7460, for appointments, before 4:00 p.m.
day preceding interview.
THURSI)AY, OCTOBER 19
Department of State, Wash. D.C. -
M & F. Mr. Donovan, Foreign Serv.

S* * *
Alpha Lambda Delta (freshman wo-
mens, honorary), reception for new
advisor: Dr. Ann Larimore (Mrs. Ko-
lars). Sunday, Oct. 15 in the "Cave"
of the Michigan League - 4th floor.
Stop by from 2-4 p.m.
* * *
German Student Association, Oct. 16,
8 p.m., 836 Tappan (Pi Beta Phi)
sponsors panel discussion on "Prospects
of Changes in United States Foreign
Policy." Speakers: Professors Claude,
Zimmermann, Inglehard and Jacob-
son (Political Science Dept).
Members of the Univesrity com-
munity interested in Objectivism, the
philosophy of Ayn Rand, who would
like to form a discussion group please
call: Philip Coates, 763-1688 or Greg
Armstrong, 665-2866
Unitarian Universalist Student Reli-
gious Liberals: Work party at First
Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw Ave,
in your old painting clothes Sunday at
4:00 p.m. Hot dawg supper at 6:30. fol-
lowed by discussion, "The Challenge
of the Liberal Ministry" with the Min-
ister of Religious Education."
* * *
La Maison Francaise, open house,
Sun., Oct. 15, 2-5 p.m., French House,
613 Oxford.
La Sociedad Hispanica, una reunion,
Mon., Oct. 16, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze,
Coffee, conversation, Hispanic music.
Vengan todos!
University Fellowship, Huron Hills
Baptist Church, Oct. 15, 7:00 p.m.,
Ann Arbor YM-YWCA, 2nd floor: In-
ter-varsity staff member Barbara
Miller and documentary film, "Urbana
'64.
*, * *
Open Dance of Square Dance Club
Oct. 17, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Women's Pool
Bldg.dEveryone invited. No experience
needed.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel-Hill St. at
Forest Ave. Speaker; Dr. Henry Het-

land, Chicago, Ill.. "Student World"
Sun. Oct. 15, 7:00 p.m.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, 9:45 a.m. and 11:15 a.m.
Worship Service, 11:15 a.m. - Bible
Class, 2:30 p.m. Cars leaving for East
Lansing to spend an afternoon with
Michigan State Gamma Deltans.
Guild House, Monday noon luncheon,
Charles A. Wells, author and publisher:
"Students and the Modern Sex Ethic,
Oct. 16, 12-1:00 p.m., 802 Monroe.
India Students' Addoriation presents
a "Cultural Program" to celebrate
Diwali (India's eFstival of Lights) on
Sat., Oct. 21 at 7:30 p.m. in the True-
Blood Aud., Frieze Bldg.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20
Honeywell. Inc.. Minneapolis, Minn.
-- M & F BA/MA Econ., Math.. Philo..
Physics and Phys. Chem. for Sales and
Data Processing Training.
Aetna Life and Casualty, Life Division,
Detroit. Mich. - BA Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts. Law, and Math for Insurance,
Mgmt. Trng., and Sales.
U.S. Civil Service Commission, De-
troit, Michigan - M & F - General
PSEE Opportunities. Railroad Retire-
ment Board and Social Security Admin-
istration interviewers here to inform.
interested students about these agen-
cies.
(Continued on Page 8)

IVS

__

-2

Sunday, 7:30 P.M.

Aud. 'A,' Angell Hall

I

-

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15
CHARLES WELLS
-AUTHOR of "BETWEEN THE LINES" who visited
Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, and the U.S.S.R.
during the summer of 1967-
"VICTORY OVER COMMUNISM
WITHOUT WAR"
7:30-PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
French room-1432 Washtenaw
6:30-Supper (Reservations needed-
662-3580 or 665-6575)
Sponsored by The Interfaith Committee

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BUSH HOUSE S.Q.
challenges
HUNT HOUSE S.Q.
to a
Tug-of-War over the Huron
Homecoming Saturday, Oc t. 21
9:30 A.M.
(after Gomberg-Taylor Tug)
..?i . :} ..v. .......:.....

"THE CHURCH AND MISSION
IN A REVOLUTIONARY WORLD"
BISHOP NEILL received his uni-
versity education at Cambridge, then
spent 20 years in india where he
h' .became Bishop of Tinnevelly in 1936.
A member of the Joint Comm. on
Church Union he was a primary
architect of the Church of South
India.
He .served as Ass't General Sec.
of the World Council of Churches
and most recently has been Prof. of
Missions at Hamburg University,
Germany.
University of Michigan, Office of Religious Affairs

UNION-LEAGUE
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