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October 13, 1967 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-13

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PAGE six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13,1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. OCTOBER 13. 1967

Third in Ingmar Bergman Series
"THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY"
Saturday, 8:00 P.M.-50c
N EWMAN-331 Thompson

U.S. INFLUENCE DROPS:
Communists Gain in France

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15
-CHARLES WELLS
-AUTHOR of "BETWEEN THE LINES" who visited
Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, and the U.S.S.R.
during the summer of 1967-
"VICTORY OVER COMMUNISM
WITHOUT WAR"
7:30-PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
French room-i 432 Washtenaw
6:30-Supper (Reservations needed-
662-3580 or 665-6575)
Sponsored by The Interfaith Committee

PARIS (CPS) - Although the
English language press hasn't re-
ported it, the United States re-
cently suffered serious political:
losses in France..
The Communist Party scored'
heavy gains this week in French
local elections, signalling the be-
ginning of the end for Gaullism.
What was more important was the
subtler vote cast against the Am-
ericans, marking the decline of
American political influence in
France.
Even though the Gaullists dump-
ed tons of propaganda in the
French countryside, calling for a
"block of the Marxist cartel," the
Communists raised their repre-
sentation from 56 to 97 in coun-
tryside councils where their terms
were up. In the newly-created
Paris region, councils, the Com-
munists won 78 of 192 seats. This
was clearly a rejection of Gaull-
ism.
In the latest issue of 'Le Nouvel
Observateur,' an article describ-
ing the Communist political ma-
chine, was a piece called "James-
bondism in Vietnam."
In the latest issue of 'Le Nouvel
Observateur', next to an article
describing the Communist political
machine was a piece called "James-
bondism in Vietnam." The latter
ridiculed "McNamara's Wall."
The article about the Com-
munists gives prominent play to
the fact that their platform in-
sists that the U.S. get out of
Vietnam. Le Nouvel Observateour
is not a Communist magazine. In
the U.S. it would be called
"establishment liberal."
When France rejects a leader
with the charisma of a DeGaulle,
as they did this week, they are
nettled by something. That some-
thing is the war in Vietnam and
U.S. influence and imperialism.
It's not contradictory for the
French to dislike both DeGaulle
and the Americans. Though De-
Gaulle is anti-American a n d
against the war, the French re-

gard both him and American
anti - Communism as anachron-
isms. DeGaulle may have been
a great war hero, he may have
tried to flimflam the U.S. at
every turn, but he is old and he
is a former imperialist. Imperial-
ism just doesn't make it in Eur-
ope any more.
The thrust of anti-Americanism
here is led by the French stu-
dents. A small number of them
have set up a new kind of Resis-
tance, reminiscent of World War
II's FFI. They are helping Amer-
ican soldiers in Europe desert if
they are slated to go to Viet-
nam, outfitting them with false
identities and papers to match.
Although the war in Vietnam
is the primary complaint against
the Americans, another import-
ant cause of irritation is U.S. in-
fluence in Latin America.
The new French revolutionary
hero is 27-year-old Regis Debray,
on trial in Bolivia for murder and
treason. Debray is accused of col-
laborating with Che Guevara, the
Argentine doctor-turned-revolu-
tionary, who is allegedly Castro's
right-hand-man in South Amer-
ica. The Bolivian government re-
ported Guevara was killed earlier
this week.
The United States is quietly
backing the military government,
and a South American newspaper
suggested that if the U.S. had
minded its own business Debray
would still be in France.
The French also see a very clear
connection between the Vietnam
war, the Debray trial, and the
Negro riots in the United States.
An article in Le Figaro by Max
Olivier-Lacamp says you can't
disassociate the riots from the
war, "above all, when the Black
Power activists repeat 'that we
must help o u r dark-skinned
brothers wrestling against Am-
erican imperialism attacking them
whereever they are-.--
"In Washington, it seems, no-
body knows what to do, and no-
body knows how much to at-

tribute to the hot summer, to the
war in Vietnam, to the change in
Martin Luther King's attitude, to
the real force of Black Power, to
rats in hovels, to police brutality,
to too-lax laws, to the Chinese
(for since Glassboro no one talks
about Communists any more), and
finally to the (ever-popular)
Negro 'psyche.'"
If they don't know in Wash-
ington, they claim to know in
Paris. From here, it is incredibly
easy to see the white-skinned U.S.
mowing down the yellow-skinned
Vietnamese, the black-skinned
Negroes, and the dark, swarthy,
mysterious L a tin Americans.
It's equally hard to see how the
U.S. continually dopes the Am-
erican public into supporting the
war, supporting an anti-ballistic
missile system, and supporting a
doddering Congress that hoots
down a rat-control bill.

a

-Associated Press
SOVIETS APPROVE BUDGET
Members of the Soviet Parliament voted unanimously yesterday to approve the 1968 Soviet Budget,
which included $18.56 billion for defense.

.

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DAILY OFF.IC.IAL BULLETIN
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0

CHRISTIAN ANSWERS
TO
WORLD PROBLEMS
Lecture-Discussion
by.
GLENN R. WINTERS
Executive Director-American Judicature Society
FRI DAY, OCT. 13th, 7:30 P.M.
UGLI Multipurpose Room
MICHIGAN CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP

The Daily Official Bulletin is an the following program produced by the
official publication of the Univer- the TV Center will have its initial
sity of Michigan for which The telgcast in Detroit:
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- 12:00 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel 4 -
ial responsibility. Notices should be THE CANTERBURY TALES. "The Wife
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to of Bath's Tale." Chaucer's delightful
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be- wife of Bath tells a tale of feminine
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding sovereignty, followed by a commentary
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday by Prof. Thomas Garbaty.
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi- The approval of the following stu-
mum of two times on request; Day dent sponsored events becomes effec-
Salendar items appear once only. tive after the publication of thisvno-
Student organization notices are not tice. All publicity for these events
accepted for publication. For more must be withheld until the approval
information call 764-9270. has become effective.
Approval request forms for student
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13 sponsored events are available in Rooms
1001 and 1546 of theh Student Activi-
ties Building.
D Calendar Kappa Alpha Theta and aPnhellenic
Assoc. - Open House, Oct. 7, 4:30-6:30
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem- p.m., 1414 Washtenaw.
inar-"Management of Managers No. Sigma Delta Tau and Panhellenic
39": 146 Business Administration Bldg., Assoc. - Football-Pledge Open House,
8:15 a.m. to 5,p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Oct. 7, 4-6 p.m., 1405 Hill.
Alpha Phi Omega-Sell the Student
Center for Programmed Learning for Directory, Oct. 9 and 10, 8:30-4:30, Diag,
Business Workshop - "Workshop for Union, Engine Arch.
Programmers": Michigan Union, 8:30 Alpha Gamma Delta and Panhellenic
a.m. to 5 p.m. Assoc. - Donut sale, Oct. 11, 8-4:30,
Fishbowl.
Dept. of Postgraduate Medicine and Peace Torch Coordinating Committee
Simpson Memorial Institute for Medi- -Rally on Diag followed by Parade on
cal Research--"International Confer- South State St. Oct. 11, 12:00 noon,
ence on Leukemia-Lymphoma": Rack- Diag.
ham Lecture Hall, 9 a.m. Sigma Chi-Inter-Fraternity Council-
Pep Rally, Oct. 12, 9 p.m., 548 South
Institute of Science and Technology State St.
Workshop - "Computer Fundamentals Committee for Improved Education
Workshop": Registration, North Cam- -Bucket Drive-Oct. 25-9 a.m.-4 p.m.
pus Commons Bldg., 11:30 a.m. Campus.
Education Juniors and Seniors: Ap-
Department of Architecture-Conrad plications for the School of Education
Roland Lehmann of Berlin, "Multi- Scholarships for the Winter Term 1968
Story Suspension Structures and Spa- (II) will be available in room 2000 Uni-
tial Cablenets," Architecture Auditor- versity High School on November 1.
lu,40 p -. Applicants must have high scholas-
tic standings, financial need, and
Psychology Colloquium - Dr. Daniel teaching potential. Both the appli-
Lehrman, Rutgers University, "Psycho- cation and the interview are to be
somatic Interactions in theh Reproduc- completed during November.
tive Behavior Cycle of Animals," Au.Placem ent
ditorium A, Angell Hall, 4 p.m.Plc m n

B. Pomeroy presents
THE VIth POOR RICHARD'S
FOLK FESTIVAL
featuring
Bob Franke
Jack Quine
Gene Barkin & 10 string guitar
Marjorie Himel & friend
Newman Wyrd
Entertainment & Refreshments 75c
Friday, Oct. 13 . . . 8:00 P.M.
NEWMAN
331 Thompson

..r:. .4 ... . {:.. ?.. . . .*ti.N :NN.r :N: .N
XX.}h~: :-i;i j" yS:4:m}. :.".-.:.::: ..: y .:.,
to find the new
AIGNER shoes to
wear with your
beauitful AIGNERI
Purse, belt, and gloves-
JOHN B. LEIDY
601 and 607 E. Liberty St.
NO 8-6779 Ann Arborr
i. :4p.'?Qi; M $i ;M .M t -

National Steel Corp., Ecrose, Mich.
All level degrees in Math and all areas
of Chem for Computing, Mgt., Trng.,
Prod., Purchas., Sales, Traffic and P
& D.
Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1967
Dun & Bradstreet, Inc., Detroit, Mich.
- M & F p.m. only. BA/MA Econ for
Mgmt. Trng. and Mktg, Res.
Stanford University Graduate School
of Business, Calif. M & F Anyone
interested in MBA or PhD programs
regardless of major.
University of Michigan Personnel
Office, Ann Arbor, Mich. - M & F
BA/MA Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts, Journ.,
Libr. Sci., Microbiol., Pharm., Bio-
chem., Chem., all flds. For Biol., Bot.,
Zoo., Libr., Mgmt. Trng., Purchas., Sec-
retarial; Writing and Gen. Writing.
John Hopkins School of Advanced
International Studies, Wash. D.C.-BA
Econ., For. Lang., Gen. Lib. Arts., Hist..
Poli. Sci., for Grad program leading to
MA in Internat'l Rel.
Central Intelligence Agency, Wash. D.
C. - M & F. All degree levels in Econ.,
For. Lang, Gen. Lib. Arts., Geog.,
Geol., Law, Libr. Sci., Math., Phys~
Poll. Sci. for Cartography, Computing,
Languages, Library, Mgt., Trng., Sec-
retarial, and Intelligence Fldg.
Wednesday, Oct. 18, 1967
Standard Oil Company, Detroit, Mich.
- BA Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts, and Or-
gan. Chem. for Mgmt. Trng., Merchan.,
Territ. Sales.
Central Intelligence Agency - See
Tues. listing.
Bell System, Detroit, Mich. - M &
F. BA/MA Econ., Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts,
Hist., Math., Poll. Sci., Psych., Phys.,
Chem. for Computing, Mgmt. Trng.,
Prod., Purchas., Sales (inside), and
persons interested ,in mgmt. regardless
of major.
Marathon Oil Company, Detroit, Mich.
- p.m. only: BA/MA Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts, for Mgmt. Trng., and Sales Rep.
Internal Revenue Service, Detroit,
Mich. - M & F BA Econ., Engl., Gen,
Lib. Arts, Hist., Math., Poli. Sci., and
Soc. for Revenue Officers and Tax
Technicians.
CURRENT POSITION OPENINGS:
Congwer News Service, Inc., Lansing,
Mich. - Reporters, publishers daily
newsletter for private clients, covers
activities of Mich. & Ohio State Legis-
latures. 2 opening - Beginner 1 yr.
exper in news reporting. Experienced
man, with managerial ability. Men
pref., BA Journ. or Poi. Sci.
Sarkes Tarzian Inc., Bloomington,
Ind. - Reporter, Magazine Editor, Wire
Editor, Chemist, Statistical Analyst,
Technical Writer, and Part-Time An-
nouncer. Also several engineering open-
ings.
MEIJER, INCE., Grand Rapids, Mich.
- Director of Finance, CPA, MBA,
combination pref. Exper in Bank rela-
tions, Public Retail., Acctg. wk., and
retail finance exper.
University of Wisconsin Medical Cen-
ter, Madison, Wis. - Research Vacan-
cies in Medicine, Physiol. Chem., Ped-
iatrics, Gneetics, Onocology, Food Sci.,
Inst for Enzyme Res., Bacteriol., Pyo-
phys., V.A. Renal Labs. Require BS
degrees in Chem., Biol., Biolchem.,
Bacteriol., and lab fields.

For further info., please call 764-
7460, Gen. Division, Bureau of Appts.,
3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE, 212,
S.A.B., Lower level.
.Union Carbine Corp.: Oak Ridge, Ta,
- Interested students, dealine on ap-
plications for this company for sum-
mer work is Jan. 1, 1968. Information
at Bureau, S.P.S.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have recorded
vacancies for the present semester:
* * *
Dexter. Mich. (Elem. Sch.)--4th grd.
Erie, Mich. (Mason Consolidated) -
Ind. Arts (9-10), Librarian (9-12) (12/
1/67).
Greenville, Mich. (Greenville Public)
-Phy. Ed.[ 7-8, Elem. Art, Elem. All
levels.
Memphis, Mich, (Memphis Comm.
Schs) - Lower El. Sp. Ed. Type A.
North Branch, Mich. (Area Schs).-
H.S. Typing and Shorthand, J. H. Lit.
& Eng., .H.S. Eng/Speech, H.S. Algebra.
Northville, Mich. (Wayne County
Training Sch.) - Year-round recreat-
ion positions, Child Care positions for
men, Counselors.
Ortonville. Mich. (Brandon Sch. Dist)
- Sec. Sp Ed Type A Instructor, Sec.
Girls Counselor.
Quincy, Mich. (Comm. Schs) - First
Grade, H.S. Boys' Phys. Ed., J. H. Sp.
Ed,
Scottville. Mich. (Mason County
Central Schs) - Home Ec. 9-12, Elem.
Principal K-6.
Schs) - H.S. Latin/Eng/Span. (Dead-
Stevensville, Mich. (Lake Shore
line for applying Oct. 26.
Chicago Heights, Ill. (Bloom Town-
ship H.&.) - School Psychologist 9-
12.
Park Forest, Ill. (Rich Township
High Schs) - H.S. Eng/Reading, H.S.
Librarian.
Streator, Ill. (Streator TWP H.S.) -
Sp. Ed. (E.M.H.) 9-12.
Eau Claire, iWs. (Jt. Dist. No. 5)-"
Scl4. Psychologist (all grades), Elem.
Sp. Ther. Math 7-8 (11/5/67)
Shawano, iWs. (Gresham) -- Sp. Corr
1-8.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
764-7459.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT
SERVICE:!
Make interview appointments at
Room 128-H, West Engrg. Bldg.
October 20, 1967
Allied Chemical Corp
Cadilac Gage Co.
Dow Chemical Co.
Electro-Voice, Inc.
Honeywell Inc.
Hooker Chemical Corp.
City of Milwaukee
Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp.
Standard Oil of Calif & Chevron Res.
Co.
Surface Combustion Div. - Mid-
land-Ross Corp.
Union Carbine Corp. - Carbon Pro-
ducts Div.
U.S. Gov't - Federal Communicat-
ions Commission. -

Astronomical Colloquium - Dr. Su-
san Wehinger, Astronomy Department,
"Low-Dispersion Infrared Spectra of
M, S, and Carbon Stars," Room 807,
Physics-Astronomy Bldg., 4 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program -
Eugene Ionesco's "Exit the King":
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
University Musical Society - Hark-
ness Ballet: Hill Auditoriu'm, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
TV Center Program: On Sun., Oct. 15

ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Public Service Commission of Can-
ada, announce openings for Personnel
Administrators, Financial administra-
tors, and Mgmt. Analysts, 1968 grads
plan to take exam.- to be held Oct. 17,
1967.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
Those wishing to make appts. with
the following, make appt. before 4:30
day preceding interview. Resumes are
required, pick up forms at Bureau. 764-
7460.
Week of October 16, 1967 through
October 20, 1967:
Monday, Oc. 16, 1967

UNION-LEAGUE i

(
Fair

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FOOTBALL TICKET RESALE
All home football games
Sat.-9-12
MICHIGAN UNION
BUY & SELL
Sorry, we can't handle student tickets

6.

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and comfort under short
fashions and lined dresses.
The nylon tricot chemise is a

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UNCLE RUSS PRESENTS
DIRECT FROM ENGLAND
THECRtEAM
IN DANCE CONCERT
Also Co-Starring:
THE THYME ... Oct. 13
THE RATIONALS.. . Oct. 14 & 15
THE APOSTLES ... Oct. 15
MC-5 . . . Oct. 13 & 15

I

D I A M OND R I N G S

FRI. & SAT. 8 P.M.-1 A.M.

SUN. 6-9 P.M.

,

private joy in sheer solids and
a bold floral. Sizes 32-34.
A. New tame flame color. 7.00
B. White or pink punch. 6.00
C. "Fire Garden" print. 9 00 4
Jcsn

;t , \

TICKETS AVAILABLE:
J. L. HUDSON, GRINNELLS, and
DISCOUNT RECORDS (S.U. STORE)
GRANDE BALLROOM
Grand River at Joy Rd.

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Rackham Lecture Hall Auditorium
KOL NIDRE Friday at 1:30 P.M.
Address by

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PIROUETTE

0. FROM $100

DR. WILLIAM HABER

F

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Dean of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts
Seats reserved for members from 6:30-7:00
General Admission Thereafter

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