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August 29, 1967 - Image 40

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

VUESDAY, ALTS

r1u;

Tears Stain Path to Prof 's Podium

members from the University. didates for the vacancy the de-
Moreovcr, since 1950, the rate of partment chairman at the Uni-
increase in salaries at the Univer- versity contacts his opposite at
sity has been lower than at any other leading schools. For due to
other Big Ten university.; the aversion of most universitiesc
Space Shortage to home-grown professors, there2
An equally important disadvan- exists a high degree of informalf
tage the University faces in the information swapping about the
recruitment of new faculty mem- caliber of junior faculty members.t
bers is the shortage of space. The department gathers informa-e
"It is hard to recruit a mathe- tion on a candidate's background,I
matician of quality when he knows recommendations, and his recordi
that at the University he will be of publications. Usually as manya
forced to share an office with an- as six to eight people are asked1
other faculty member," Hays ex- to give evaluations of a prospective
plains. candidate.
Hays cites as another problem According to Hays, the Univer-r
the fact that the University does sity is after men who are able to
te factithatnthe-Unieity oes both teach and to publish. He ex-t
not offer fringe-benefits offered pan htgnrlyfclymm
b:- other schools, primarily private plainbers should at least be demon-
nttuons. ystrably adequate" in both areas.
"The University," he says, "could A prospective professorial candi-t
not offer the frequent leaves of date has to make a "remarkableI
absence that other schools offer to contribution" in either teaching orE
faculty members." Another flrnge research to outweigh a lack of
benefit offered by many colleges is interest or ability in the otherr
free college tuition for children area.n
of faculty members. Top Contender
There are other factors which The top contender for the ap-
also minimize the importance of pointment, during his visit to cam-i
salary in recruiting faculty. Sala- pus, may conduct a class or discusss
ries may be less crucial in the research projects; he will partici-c
physical and social sciences be- pate in endless conversations con-s
cause of alternate sources of in- cerning his teaching experiencer
come such as fellowships and re- and academic interests. He will
search grants. speak with at least one dean and
Ann Arbor has one of the high- be evaluated by as many depart-t
est costs-of-living in the country ment members as possible.-
and this too serves to increase the If the proposed appointee is ac-
importance of financial com- cepted by a majority of the de-
parisons. However, Hays says that partment, permission to extendt
most high prestige schools are an offer to him is requested of thet
located in relatively high-cost of dean. If the dean gives his ap-
living areas. proval the bargaining process be-t
Recruitment of faculty is not gins.
limited to a particular time of the The University has "bargainingf
year-talented teachers are always flexibility," Hays says. The bar-1
in season. If a department finds gaining is done by the dean andr
itself in need of personnel it sends the department chairman andk
a request to recruit to the dean's often the University is prepared .
office of the particular college during the negotiations to raise'
where it is either rejected or ap- the salary offer by as much as onee
proved. thousand dollars.r
Often in preparing a list of can- Hays indicates that this yeara

with the "budget prospects grim"
the University has been "cautious"
in making new appointments.
"What is affected is not the
quality of the people, but the
number of the people we will ap-
point," he says.
Since the University has a cer-
tain number of dollars to spend
on new faculty, they could either
hire less experienced people, or
hire fewer experienced professors.
Hays says that in general the
University is just hiring fewer
people, though he adds that this
varies from department to depart-
ment.
If unanimous agreement is ob-
tained from all involved, the ap-
pointment is made and undergoes
processing through the executive
council of the college involved. It
then goes to the office of the Vice-
President for Academic Affairs
and then to the Regents. At the
end of this rigorous process the
recruited professor's name is duti-
fully added to the fat University
catalogue.
The end of each year brings
many applications for junior po-
sitions to each department. Be-
cause of this Hays explains, "a
school like this does not have to
recruit like a teacher's college."
Excess Applicants
Despite this excess of applicants
there is a national shortage of
PhD's in teaching. The problem
is simply that while thousands of
schools are desperate for PhD's}
they naturally gravitate toward
the leading universities.
Perhaps the largest variable de-
termining the University's success
in recruiting is the quality of the
academic department involved. A
leading department serves as a
magnet for superior faculty mem-
bers. As Prof. Samuel Eldersveld
of the political science department
says, "It is much easier to build
on strength that you already have,
rather than strengthen a weak
area within the department."

area within the department."

1I I

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