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October 06, 1967 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-06

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PAGE TEN

TAE VICHI+GAN DAILY

FRIDAY. OCTOBER 6,196,

PACE TEN TilE MICUIGAN DAiLY FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6,1967

Workshops Probe War, Race, Hippies

.. . . . . . .......... ......

By RON LANDSMANc
Efforts to end war research can
be more effective against govern-
ment policy than teach-ins- and1
demonstrations, participants int
the teach-in workshop on "Pro-
fessionals, the Universities, and
the , War" decided Wednesday
night.4
The teach-in held Wednesdaye
night, which featured such na-
tionally known radicals as Staugh-a
ton Lynd, John Gerassi and Carl
Oglesby, as well as University pro-
fessors and community organizersf
from Detroit and Ann Arbor, at-a
tempted to analyze the current]
growing crisis in America.
The teach-in on war research
featured Prof. Anatol Rapoport of;
the mathematical biology depart-
ment, Prof. Jules Schrager of the
social work school, Thomas Kohn,
M.D., and Eric Chester of Voice
Political Party. Prof. Robert Sklar
of the history department .was
moderator.
'Chester pointed out in his open-
ing statement that the University
was recognized by a government
official; as "the oustanding school
for combat research." Such a role,
Rapoport noted, "is contrary to
the purposes of the University."
No Consensus.'
The group was unable to reach
a consensus on how to oppose war
research. One member of the au-
dience urged that all research re-
motely related to the war be dis-
continued, but Rapoport countered
that "everything could conceivably
be utilized for war."
Sklar thenturned the discus-
sion to the role intellectuals and
professionals have and can play
in American society. "We are seen
when we act as agitators, but riot
in our role as intellectuals," he
said.
Rapoport observed that intellec-
tuals speak a "different dialect,
grating to the ears of most Amer-
icans."
"American intellectuals are in
an unenviable position," he added.
"This is one of the few areas
where professionals are at a dis-
advantage."
A Frenchman in the audience
Ul

compared the situation here to
what he had known in Algeria
during the Algerian War. He1
pointed out that in France then
there was a tie between the labor,
movement and the intellectuals.
Chester pointed out that France'
was unlike America in that it had1
an "ideological heritage, an un-
derstanding of how their society
runs," which Americans do not
have.
Professors
This problem, the group noted,
extends to professors as well. A
member of the teach-in audience
pointed out that the Defense De-
partment has no trouble getting
professors to take its research
work,
Charges from the audience
against the military establishment
itself were countered by Chester
and Rapoport.
Chester saw the military as
only a manifestation of the deeper
faults of our society. "The econ-
omy is only abuse to sustain a
boom during war times."
"The emphasis on the military
rather than on social reform' will
continue after the war is ended,"
he concluded.
Race Relations
B MICHAEL DOVER
That the "definite re-arrange-
ment of priorities" by our govern-
ment as a result of the Vietnamese
war had a profound effect on race
relations in this country was one
of the few points of agreement at
the workshop on "The Impact of
the War on American Society"
held -Wednesday night as part of
the teach-in.
Participants also agreed that
the war has made many people,
especially Negroes, more aware of
the "almost inherent colonial
racism" which our society perpe-
tuates not only , on others but on
its own cities.

The workshop panel, whicha
featured Prof. Donald Michaels oft
the English Language Institute,o
Prof. Raphael Ezekiel of the psy-t
chology department and Prof. Wil-
liam Gamson of the sociology de-o
partment, split with much of ther
audience on the degree of "con-s
sciousness" of this inherent ra-
cism."
Negroes in the audience felt thatt
it is a "war of racism." They con-t
sidered it a parallel to the "co-
lonial suppression of black peo-
ple in the United States" on ra-x
cial, economic, and politicalx
grounds.
Michaels, however, saw both
battlegrounds as part of the "un-t
conscious racial policies" of the
American white world minority.
The intention, he maintained, was
to retain control over the massest
of colored people to prove theirr
collective potency to themselves. X
"He never believed he could be
'impudent' in a democracy and he
is suddenly bewildered," Ezekiel
said.
Another Negro in the audience
claimed that "blacks here readily
identify with the plight of the!
people of Vietnam." She went
on to say that Negroes are begin-
ning to realize the futility of fight-
ing while "there is a war to fight
here at home."
Speakers at the workshop also
noted the dehumanizing effect of
the war, making people callous and
indifferent toward violence.
Hippie Credo,
By LEE WEITZENKORN

all about." He added, however, room. Incense sticks were passed
that hippie life is mainly a way through the group, during the
of looking at life and drug usage workshop,
is not necessary to it. When confronted with contro-
The workshop was a loosely- versial questions, Sinclair often
organized session of questions chose to joke his way out of the
posed by the audience and an- situation rather than answer di-
swered solely by Sinclair. rectly. When one participant
He urged protestors to avoid asked Sinclair if he would halt
the norms of the larger society. a troop train, he answered, "No,
"You can't get up in a suit and I'd get run over."
tie and say you're against the war. Sinclair devoted much time to
You must refrain from taking a discussion of popular music He
part in the society which pro- said the music of the Beatles and
duced the war; you can't contri- the Rolling Stones is "not just
bute to its economy." a different kind tmusic, it has
When asked why hippies don't itsdowncontent." He described
take part in political activities, it as a revolution in music. Bob
Sinclair said, "What is anybody Dylan, he said, was "the first per-
doing to help the human race?'I son to start writing songs that
The workshop, which was at- said something." He described the
tended by mane hippies, was Beatles as "typical, all-American
moved to a hallway after partici- English boys who all of a sudden
pants filled a Mason Hall class- became freaks,"

presents
THE SIXTH ANNUAL, 11

i

DANCE

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United Church of Christ
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"MAN OR MACHINE,
WHO'S IN CONTROL?"
HENRY WALLACE
Industrial Engineering, Social Work Background
FUTURE DATE: Oct. 22

I

I

Three Performances in Hill Auditoriuim
HARKNESS BALLET . . . .. . . .. Fri., Oct. 13, 8:30
P1rogram: Night Song; Feast of Ashes; Zealous Variaions (Schubert, Op. 8,3); and
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Singe Performances. S4.00-s3.4#-s .04
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR

"National law has to prevail,
even though the machine is here,"
John Sinclair of the Detroit Art-
ists' Workshop said at the teach-
in session on "Moral Disaffection
and the Rise of the Hippies."
Sinclair offered the hippie doc-
trine of "turn on, tune in, drop
uot." He said that drug usage
"is the key to what everything is

(Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 to 4:30; Sat., 9 to 12)

Telephone:

665-3717

Transportation:

665-8167,
665-2831

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RUN FOR YOUR LIFE
A Sermon on Life and Death
by
HOOVER RUPERT
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
October 8-9:00 and 11:15 A.M.
Broadcast WOIA-WOIB.11 :00 A.M.

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UNION-LEAGUE

CONTEMPORARY DISCUSSION COMMITTEE

presents

"ANARCHY

U.S.A."

MONDAY, OCT. 9,7:30 P.M.

UNION BALLROOM
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

-This film, just released by the John Birch Society, examines
some of the outbreaks in our urban ghetto areas this past summer

Girl bands are few and far between, and to find
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NEWMAN STUDENT ASSO(IATION presents:
Seventh Annual
CATHOLIC VOICE LECTURE SERIES

ROBERT T.
FRANCOEUR

III

Original Sin as a Collective Reality
C I

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