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October 04, 1967 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-04

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4, x.967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC £AA iM.bE4IP

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4,1967 THE MICHIGAN IJAILV

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House Postpones
Surtax Approval
Budget Bill Furnishes Temporary
Financing for Government Agencies

CONVENTION VOTE:
Wilson Receives Labor Party
Support for Economic Poliey

WASHINGTON (P)-A fiscally
worried House refused yesterday
to order President Johnson to cut
R the budget, but indirectly told
him that if he doesn't it won't
consider his tax boost request.
The dual action came on the
House floor and in its tax-writing
Ways and Means Committee.
The House sent to the Senate
by voice vote a bill to provide
temporary financing, until Oct.
10, for more than a score of fed-
eral agencies which technically
went broke last Saturday mid-
Senate Votes
To Restore
Space Fund's
WASHINGTON (Pl)-Rejecting
some of the deep slashes the
House had voted, the Senate Ap-
propriations Committee voted yes-
terday to add $95.5 million to the
House-passed space money bill.
It recommended a $4,678,900,-
000 appropriation for the space
program for the fiscal year which
began July 1.
Sen. Warren G. Magnuson (D-
Wash.), floor manager for the
bill, noted that the total still is
$421 million below the initial bud-
get request and $289 million be-
low the amount voted for the Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration last year.
President Johnson previously
had said he would accept the re-
ductions of $516 million voted by
the House.
Magnuson said the committee
increases would permit contin-
uance of work on numerous pro-
jects to be carried out after the
manned lunar landings in the
Apollo project.
Johnson initially asked $5.1 bil-
lion to carry on the space pro-
gram this year but Congress in
an authorization bill cut this by
$234 million. The House then
slashed out another $282 million
when it passed the separate money
bill but the Senate panel restored
$95.5 million of this.

night. Their money for the fiscal
year that started July 1 is tied
up in pending appropriation bills.
But first the House turned
back. 213 to 205, a Republican
drive to add to the financing
measure a mandate to the Presi-
dent tocut at least $5 billion
from the current fiscal year
budget. This was a reversal of
last Thursday's 202-182 vote that
recommitted another temporary
financing bill because it didn't in-
clude a spending-cut angle.
While the House was engaged
in debate over whether the Presi-
dent or Congress should take the
lead in cutting spending, the
Ways and Means Committee, by
a 20-5 vote, laid aside considera-
tion of the President's tax in-
crease proposal "until such time
as the President and the Congress
reach an understanding" on
budget cutting.
Such an "understanding" may
be reached before the end of this
month, for the Senate is expect-
ed to extend the life of thel
House-passed temporary financ-
ing bill to Oct. 31 or longer.
That would give the House Ap-
propriations Committee m o r e
time to work on the promise of
its chairman, Rep. George H.
Mahon (D-Tex.), to review past
and current appropriations with
the hope of cutting back moneyE
available to the President forl
spending. E
The administration has claim-t
ed it can't cut spending until allE
the appropriation bills become
law and the President knows how
much money will be available.
Only four of 14 regular money
measures have become law.
"The tax bill is dead; we killed
it today," Rep. Melvin R. Laird E
of Wisconsin told a reporter.
Laird, chairman of the GOP Con-
ference, was a leader in the los-
ing fight to tie the mandatoryC
budget-cutting rider to the emer-t
gency money bill.
But Rep. Al Ullman (D-Ore.) 1
of the Ways and Means Commit-r
tee said the odds are that a taxi
bill will be passed. And Chairman
Wilbur D. Mills (D-Ark.) said,I
"The atmosphere is such that a X
tax bill would not be approved
by the committee or passed bya
the House."

HIPPIEVILLE RAID NETS
Three members of the singing group, the Grateful Dead, were ja
and five girl friends on suspicion of possessing narcotics. The arres
Francisco headquarters. Rod McKernan, 22, is third from left an
group's managers, is at right. Others refused to be identified.
" I
UReN VetS.mIGH olC

SCARBOROUGH, England W)_-
In a fighting speech that won at
standing ovation, Chancellor oft
the Exchequer James Callaghan
persuaded the Labor party conven-]
tion yesterday to endorst the gov-]
erment's management of the wob-t
bly British economy. It was a,
smashing succes for Prime Min-1
ister Harold Wilson's Labor gov-1
ernment. '
Big trade unions leaders led the1
assault on Wilson's economic pol-
icies, charging that the wage-price
freezes and other measures were
responsible for Britain's record
600.000 unemployed.
Foreign Secretary
Despite the economic debate, the
-Associated Press talk among the 6,000 delegates was
'DEA T) mostly about thetempestuous
UJII4AL)night of Foreign Secretary George
Brown
iled Monday with two managers Bwn.
t came after a raid on their San The foreign secretary landed
d Danny Rifkin, 24, one of the neck deep in trouble at midnight
when in public view he protested
loudly and bitterly to newsmen at
the way photographers had been
hounding his wife and himself.
In lurid terms he acccused the
cameramen of wanting to match
pictures taken of him by American
d photographers while he was dan-
cing the Frug aboard the Queen
Mary in New York last month.
res ' S ;Bitish papers splashed those pic-
es, o ls tures and it was believed that Wil-
son subsequently addressed a
termination for the people of withering message to his foreign
South Vietnam is one of the U.S. secretary.
goals, Fulbright questioned wheth- All day long the affair domi-
er the recent election had been a nated talk among party delegates
fair one. with most of them, and Brown's
"You haven't mentioned any- ministerial colleagues among them,
thing yet that makes me believe wondering how long he could sur-
the objective is worth what we are vive in high office.
doing," Fulbright said. Summoned by Wilson
Dirksen and Sens. George Mui'- The speculation intensified when
phy (R-Calif) and Democratic it became known Wilson had sum-
Sen.nry M. Jackson andWar- moned his deputy prime minister
ren G. MagnusonheWashingtonfor a heart-to-heart talk. Brown
rallied behind Kuchel's assertionshwduwerndakgse.
that the United States must not showed up wearing dark glases.
abandon its Asian commitments. No one in authority was sug-
'Nameless Settlement' gesting Wilson would go so far as
They supported his declaration to fire Brown or to transfer him
that this country must not "throw from the Foreign Office at a time
away what free people have fought when the need for governmental
valiantly torachieve in Southeast unity is paramount.
Asia" by accepting some "name- Yet leaders could hardly fail to
less settlement" to end the con- realize that the image Brown is
flict. projecting could tarnish the gov-
Fulbright backed Symington's ernment and make life for it that
call for a suspension of all Amer- much harder.
ican military operations on a fixed' Brown, today and tomorrow, is
date, to learn if Hanoi would re- due to defend the government's
spond. -- -

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
SAIGON-A total of 1,240 can-
didates seek seats in the 137-
member House of Representatives
to be elected Oct. 22, Vietnam
P r e s s, the government news
agency, said yesterday.
A 60-member Senate was chosen
Sept. 3 .
The representatives will be
elected from 53 constituencies
throughout South Vietnam. Voters
of Saigon, the capital, will choose
15.
WASHINGTON - President
Johnson has nominated Howard
J. Samuels, a New York indus-
trialist, as undersecretary of com-
merce, the White House an-
nounced yesterday.
Samuels, 47, president of Kor-
dite Corp., a plastic products
Thursday & Friday
The Iron Horse
dir. John Ford, 1924
Uncut version of Ford's
monumental epic on the
Winning of the West.
"A national epic!"
-Arthur Knight
Saturday & Sunday
MARIUS TRILOGY
PART II: FANNY
WINE, WOMEN,
AND SONG
featuring Raimu
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
STILL ONLY 50cT

policy of support for the U.S. posi- Monday could hardly have been
tion in Vietnam and of seeking en- timed more unfortunate either for
try into Europe's Common Market. himself or the government.
Both aret hot issues. Fourteen Two left-wing union leaders,
labor unions are demanding that Frank Cousins and Clive Jenkins,
Britain dissociate from American led the attack on the government's
policy in Vietnam. Leftist and economic policies. They charged
rightist factions have teamed up that Wilson's administration was
to challenge British entry into the using methods that betrayed So-
Common Market. cialist principles. Both demanded
In the circumstances Brown's a change of policy, including a
behavior over a six-hour period cutback in defense spending.
Steel Haulers Warn Strike
To Spread, Vow Roadblocks

manufacturer, would succeed act-
ing Undersecretary J. Herbert
Holloman. His nomination re-
quires Senate confirmation.
* * *
DETROIT - General Motors
Corp., the giant of the nation's
Big Three automakers, reported
yesterday its sales in September
were 61,000 above sales in the
same month a year earlier.
The totals for September's last
10 days were 206,532 cars and
22,872 trucks, compared, to 118,-
753 cars and 20,151 trucks sold in
the last 10 days of September
1966, GM said.
Ford Motor Co., its production
lines idled since Sept. 7 by a
strike of 160,000 United Auto
Workers Union members, and the
other member of the Big Three-
Chrysler-have not yet reported
their sales figures for September.
CINEMA II
PRESENTS
JASON
ROBARDS JR.
in
AThousand
Cowns
SHORT: CHAPTER 3
FLASH GORDON
GOES TO MARS
Friday, Saturday
and Sunday
7 and 9:15 P.M.
Auditorium A
Angell Hall 50

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WASHINGTON (,)-Sens. Ever-
ett M. Dirksen (R-Ill) and J. W.
Fulbright (D-Ark) clashed heat-
edly yesterday over whether . a
Communist takeover of Asia hing-
es on the outcome of the Vietnam
war.
Dirksen, the Republican leader
and defender of President John-
son's Asian policies, and Ful-
bright, chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee and a critic
of the President's policies, climax-
ed a day of explosive debate over
Vietnam.
'Shadow of Communism'
In a dramatic arm-waving
speech, Dirksen told the Senate
that the defense of South Vietnam
is essential to the security of the
United States. If Vietnam falls,
he said, the shadow of Commun-
isi will darken all Asia.
"Then the whole Pacific coast-
.ie of the United States is ex-
posed," he said.
Rising directly across the center
aisle, Fulbright replied softly "I
don't agree at all."
'Not Only Vietnam'
He argued that the security of
this country lies at home and
elsewhere in the world; not in
Vietnam. He said continuing the
war will weaken the United States
at home and lessen its ability to
defend its own security.
Sen. Stuart Symington (D-Mo)
sparked the debate with a propos-
al for a U.S. cease-fire to test
Hanoi's peace intentions.
Sen. Thomas H. Kuchel of Cal-
ifornia, Dirksen's GOP leadership
assistant, quickly opposed any
A.merican "stand-down that would
permit the North Vietnamese uni-
laterally to improve their position"
while the United States grounded
its planes and silenced its guns.
'Flank Will Be Turned'
Dirksen said the CommunistsI
mean to liquidate the freedom ofh
South Vietnam. If they do, he
said, "our flank will be turned."
Fulbright challenged Dirksen's
assertion that the loss of South
Vietnam would force' the United
States to bring its western de-
fense line to a point "between
Alaska and Hawaii and that San
Francisco and Los Angeles."

Did Dirksen advocate a perma-
nent American presence in Asia?
Fulbright asked. He had said
nothing about that. Dirksen re-
plied. He said a stable Saigon
government could take care of
its own military needs.
No Jump-Off Point
Fulbright argued it is not real-
istic to assume that Soviet Russia
needs South Vietnam as a jump-
ing-off point if it plans attacks
in the Pacific area. He said Com-
munist China has shown no dis-
position to fight the United States.
The Dirksen-Fulbright debate
grew sharp.
"You've been quarrelling for the
last year with the conduct of the
war," Dirksen shouted at Ful-
bright. "Tell us what you want
to do-quit nowsand get out?"
Fulbright replied that his rec-
ommendation was to reconvene
the Geneva conference, with Great
Britain and Russia as co-sponsors,
to propose a course of action.
When Dirksen said that self-de-

THIS WEEK AT.
1 421 H ill St.
8:30 P.M.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
T THE APOSTLES
a four-piece rock combo
"Nobody has as much fun as the APOSTLES.. .
Except those who come to see them."
(room for Dancing)
SATURDAY ---
BOB FRANKE
singing ballads, Dylan Songs, and ORIGINAL folk
music, playing guitar, banjo, and harmonica
& JOHN MILLER
$ 1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments I

TONIGHT
JOHN WATSON, Editor The Inner City Voice
Detroit's new militant newspaper
PAUL LOWINGER M.D.
e Detroit Uprisings
Slides and discussion at the less publicized
side of the events in Detroit last July

PITTSBURGH (A)-The eight-
state steel haulers strike marred
by stonings, shootings and beat-
ings threatened to spread yester-
day, when strike leaders vowed to
stop everything on the highways
"except wheelbarrows and bi-
cycles."
Calling Friday's proposed peace
plan with the Teamsters Union
a "standard line of doubletalk-
ing, lies and contradictions," the
steel haulers said it was voted
down almost to a man.
The rejection brought renewed
violence in Pennsylvania and
Ohio. A trucker was shot near
Fremont, Ohio, and another was
beaten unconscious in Canfield,
Ohio.
Trucking companies that had
reopened hopefully with the
weekend news of a truce began
closing down again yesterday.
"We don't make enough money
to risk somebody's life out there,"
said a man at Pittsburgh Haul-
age. "I had one man come in
with a gun and say, 'Which one
do you want me to take?' I didn't
let him go anywhere, but I know
guys who are.'
'Weapons on Seat'
Another trucker said, "I don't
want to -mention names but we
had three men leave here yester-
day and they had large, danger-
ous weapons on the seat."
In the steel centers of Ohio and
Pennsylvania, the violence has re-
sembled guerrilla warfare. Snip-
ers fire from ambush along dark-
ened turnpike overpasses. They
drop rocks through windshields.
Others slash tires and cut air
hoses.

Big steel producers, with no
way to truck steel as the 10,000 to
20,000 drivers stayed off the road,
have been forced to cut produc-
tion and lay off some workers.
Despite turning to the railroads,
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., the
No. 5 producer, estimates Septem-
ber shipments were down 30 per
cent.
Monday night's violence was
the worst since the wildcat strike
started seven weeks ago in Gary,
Ind., and spread east. Traffic was
snarled for hours as gangs of
angry men blocked trucks near
Erie, Pa., and Canfield, Ohio.
A 14-acre parking lot near Can-
field was filled with 300 trucks.
Pennsylvania state p o 11 c e,
forced to double night patrols,
spent hours untangling 70 to 80
big rigs snarled by gangs of angry
men near Erie. More than a dozen
windshields were shattered by
rocks and pellet guns on a 100-
mile stretch of the turnpike be-
tween Pittsburgh and Everett.
'Never Go Back'
"Most men feel we will never.,
ever go back under terms of our
old contract," signed last spring,
said William Kusley, 39, of Gary,
Ind., organizer of the dissident
group.
"Our next move is to go out
after everything that moves on
the highways," Kusley told a news
conference in Pittsburgh.
No talks were scheduled.
The dissident truckers want a
6 per cent increase to 79 per cent
of the gross revenue they now re-
ceive for hauling steel. They also
want paid for time spent at mills
to load and unload as well as a
separate Teamsters contract.

I1

U

330 MAYNARD ST.
8:00 P.M.

STARTS THURSDAY
"EXTRAVAPANTLY
BOLD and BIZARRE'
Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"MISS ZETTERLING
MAKES EACH SCENE
A WORK OF ART.
STUNNING EFFECTS."
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"THE VOYEUR'S
DELIGHT OF THE YEAR:"
-Judith Crist, World Journal Tribune
Night Games
GRID THULIN
ADMITTANCE RESTRICTED TO
PERSONS OF AGE 18 MINIMUM
Mon.-Thurs. 7, 9 P.M.
Fri., Sat. 7, 9 & 11 P.M.
Sun, 6, 8 & 10P.M.
r

STEPHAN'S
Corner of S.U. and E. U.
769-5176
RESTAURANT
Instant Service-Roast Chicken
Carry Out
7:00 A.M.-9:00 P.M.
NEWSPAPERS
NEW YORK TIMES, Detroit News,
Detroit Free Press, Michigan Daily
Sundays and Dailies
Patent Medicines-Drugs
7:00 A.M.-12:00 P.M.

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Mademoiselle

is coming to U-M campus

-

CAROL NICKLAUS

I

College Board Competitions Editor
invites YOU to an Open House

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4

from 3-5 P.M.
3rd floor, SAB

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