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October 03, 1967 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-10-03

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PAGt TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3,1967

rA~t TWO TUE MICUIGANT DAILY TUESDAY. OCTOBER 3.1967

MUSIC
Martinon Concert 'Sturdy'

Program
Ciaconna ... Buxtehude-Chavez.
Concerto for Trumpet in D
Major ...... ... Telemann
Symphony No. 7 (Premiere per-
formance)..........Sessions
Nobilissima Vislone. .Hindemith
La Valse ............... Ravel
By JAMES SVEJDA
It is no well-kept secret that
since the late Fritz Reiner's re-
tirement several years ago, the
Chicago Symphony has lost the
once entirely possible distinction
of being the finest orchestra in
the country.
Certainly finding men of Rein-
er's caliber isn't easy. But there
have been other things: union
problems, which aren't exactly
calculated to improve artistic
morale; the personality conflicts
that have led to the bouncing of
at least one of the orchestra's
principal players; and the greater
advantages in teaching that have
dr-awn men like Farkas and Shar-
row away.
The loss of key men always
cuts into the cohesiveness of an
orchestra. But it also diminishes
its finesse, that ability to anti-

cipate and complement a soloist's
moves ahead of time, which only
comes after years of association
with the same men.
But despite the occasional rough
edge in the strings and the slight
unsteadiness in some of the light-
ly scored ,wind passages, the Chi-
cago Symphony is still a magnifi-
cent orchestra. And although
Martinon may not be in Reiner's
league, he is still a very capable
conductor.
After a sturdy and tight-knit
performance of the Buxtehude-
Chavez "Ciaconna," the orchestra
thinned to chamber proportions
for one of the Telemann D major
trumpet concertos. Martinon's ac-
companiment was sensitive and
understanding. However, he could
have done with a few less fiddles
since they badly over balanced
the delicate harpsicord continuo.
Not counting a few understand-
able slips on the treacherous little
L trumpet, Adolph Herseth's solo
performance was bright and styl-
ish.
The big news at the concert
was the world premiere of Roger
Sessions' "7th Symphony," a work
which happily proves that good
things can still be found in the
dreary confusion of the "new"
music.

Remarkably free of those iso-
lated blurps and bleeps that many
composers insert nowadays to
keep their audiences from falling
asleep, the symphony is an intel-
ligent and humane expression in
a medium that is foreign to so
many of us. There are times when
the going gets rough, but from
beginning to end there isn't any
doubt that a great craftsman and
subtle mind is at work.
The first movement, perhaps a
bit too coldly objective for some
tastes, nevertheless has a tremen-
dous rhythmic vitality. But even
the charge of being overly objec-
tive is lost in the second move-
ment and Largo-epilogue, both
of which are filled with lyrical
and yes, even tender passages.
Sessions has always deserved
more attention than he has got-
ten, both in concerts and record-
ings. The easy accessibility of the
big tunes and plesant harmonies
of Copland, Barber and that
crowd has tended to obscure our
appreciation for a man who just
may be our greatest living com-
poser.
Sessions received a medal from
the Sesquicentennial committee.
The performance, ' high-charged
and presumably authentic, receiv-
ed polite applause.
The high point of Martinon's
performance came in the "Nobi-
lissima Visione" by Hindemith. A
somewhat relaxed reading of the
opening meditation was followed
by a march that had, especially
in its fugal section, an exciting
sense of forward pulse. The finale
was intense and glowing. Here,
the Chicago brass made the walls
bulge.
Ravel's "La Valse," the only

Across
Camp us
Mark Peterman, general chair-
man of MUSKET 1968, has an-
nounced the following appoint-
ments to the MUSKET Central
Committee: Kate Sigel, assistant
chairman; Rick Borenstein, pub-
licity; Barbara Brown, props;
Donna Farnum, secretary; Jim
Fisher, program advertising; Les-
lie Friedman, coordinating artist;
Larry Gold, productions; Ilene
Goldman, tickets and ushers; Don-
na Hawald, promotions; Don Hor-
owitz, communications; Patti Lan-
der, tickets and ushers; Phil Lev-
off, stage manager and technical
director; Peggy Morgenstern, sec-
retary; Barb Newman, program
advertising; M a r k Rosenberg,
treasurer; Carol Rosenthal, set
designer; Dick Sies, lighting; Mar-
shall Slocum, program designer.
Howard Travis and Henrietta
Kleinpell were named as co-direc-
tors with Bruce Fisher as musical
director.
MUSKET's production, to be
presented during the winter se-
mester, will be the Broadway mus-
ical, "Irma La Douce."
ORGAN IZATI ON
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.
* * *
The Honors Steering Committee is
now open to petitioning for new mem-
bers. Petition forms may be picked
up and submitted at 1210 Angell Hall.
Deadline for petitioning is Oct. 12.
* * *
Delta Phi Epsilon holds open meet-
ing and speaker, Prof. Steinberg, "Mi-
nority Groups of S.E. Asia," Oct. 3, 7:30
p.m., Room 3C Union.
* * *
Hillel Foundation, Rosh Hashono serv-
ices; Wed., Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m.; Oct. 5,
9:30 a.m.; Fri. Oct. 6, 9:30 a.m., at
Rackham Lecture Hall.
** *
Bach Club holds meeting; lecture-
recital by Jane Hettrick on "Bach's
Organ Music?" Wed., Oct. 4. 8 p.m.
at Dr. Mason's Studio, 2110 School of
Music. Meet at 7:45 p.m. at Guiid
House. 802 Monroe, if you need trans-
portation.
* * *

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg.be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3
.Da yCalendar
Flu Shots: There will be a "flu shot"
clinic at the Health Service, Tues.,
Oct. 3. from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30
p.m. The charge is $1.50 for students
and spouse and $2 for faculty, staff
and spouses.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"Management of Managers No.
38": 146 Business Administration Bldg.,
8:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.
Major Sesquicentennial Celebration
-Voices of Civilization-Harold Urey,
"The Origins of Life": Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, 2 p.m.; Edwin 0. Reischauer,
informal question and answer period:
Rackham Assembly Hall, 2 p.m.; Shoji
Hamada, gallery discussion and exhibit:
Museum of Art, 3 p.m.; Jean Piaget:
Rackham Lecture Hall, 4 p.m.; Ann
Arbor city reception and dinners: Stat-
ler-Hilton Inn and private homes, 5:30
p.m.; Paul Samuelson: Rackham Lec-
ture Hall, 8 p.m.; Shoji Hamada, "On
Folk Art": Architecture Aud., 8 p.m.
Astronomical Talk-Dr. SubrabAn-
yam Chandrasekhar, University of Chi-
cago, "Aspects of General Relativity
Bearing on Astronomy, I," Aud. F,
Physics-Astronomy Bldg., 4:15 p.m.
American Association of University
Women Lecture (Ann Arbor Branch)-
Dr. Walter M. Spink, University of
Michigan, "The Revelation of Nature
in China": Rackham Amphitheatre, 7:30
p.m.
Professional Theatre Program - Hart-
Kaufman's "You Can't Take It With
You": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8
p.m.
School of Music Honors Recital -
Susan Nelson, saxophone: School of
Music Recital Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General 1Notices
Physical Education - Women Stu-
dents: Women students taking requir-
ed physical education who were med-

ically defe
this term rorG
Barbour G
second half
will be hel
1 to 5 p.
Wednesday
Upperclas.
to elect phi
do so onT
ings only, (
Dept. of1
the French
aminations
that depar
Please sign
partment
phone 764-0
All Stude
tion (Und
for the W
progress. I
material m
UHS: Stud
Doctoral
Raye Gern
Measureme
fine Structi
the He(3).
619 P-A a
Sands.
Student C
of the fo
events bec
the publica
licity for t
held untilt
fective.
Approval
sponsorede
1011 of the
Mobilizat
28, 29; Oct.
bowl.
Friendso
teach-in (
10 a.m., Anf
SGC, GS
Republican
rally on Di
.Fort
The folio
reached th
Programs O
Peter Ha
New Guine
Oct. 5-7.
Farat Ab
nomics, di
Research P
Baghdad, I
Mr. andP
lin, Colomb
Pradel P
quistics, Sti
companied
ly). Oct. 10
Twelve e
Board of E
Charles
of Econom
Oct. 8-14.

DAILY OFFICIAL

...........

Placement

BU L LET IN 'PLACEMENT INTERN'1111s:' Those
wishing to interview the following em-
ployers must have forms in the Bureau
_....... by the end of this week. Employers ex-
pect to see this resume. Call 764-7460
rred for the first half of for appointments, and come to General
should report to Office 15, Division, 3200 SAB, to get forms.
4ymnasium, to sign for the M}ON. , OCT. 9-
f of the term. Registration Mobil Oil Corp,, Niles, Ill. - Male &
d from 8 a.m. to noon and female. BA Gen. Lib. Arts, all disci-
i.., Monday, Tuesday and, plines. Computing Mgmt. Trng. and
, Oct. 2-4. Sales (inside and territorial).
s women students who wish Inland Steel Co., Chicago, 111.-Male
iysical education classes may & female. Any degree, any major.
Thursday and Friday morn- Mgmt. Trng.. Sales (inside and terr-
)ct. 26 and 27. torial), Finance, Computer Systems.
Joseph T. Ryerson & Son, Chicago,?
Linguistics: Will be offering 1II.-Male & female. BA Anthro., Econ.,
1and German language ex- Engl., Gen, Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ.,
for the MA for students in Math, Philo., PolL Sci., Psych., Soc.
tment on Oct. 19 and 20. and Chem. Adc.. Computing. Mgmt.
1 up in the linguistics de- Trng., Personnel, Production, Sales (in-
office, 218 Gunn Bldg. or, side and territorial), Secretarial. Chi-
0353, as quickly as possible. cago and worldwide.
,TUES., OCT. 10--
nts in the School of Educa- Hallmark Cards, Inc., Kansas City,
ergraduate): Preclassification Mo.--Male & female. BAiMBA Econ.,
inter Term (II) 1968 is in Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts, Journ, Math,
t will end on Dec. 4. The Psych. & Organic Chem, For Trade,
ay be obtained in Room 2000 Mgmt. Trng. Res., Merchan., Personnel,
ents should register early. Prod., Stat., Territorial Sales, General
Writing, Corporate Planning and Oper-
Examination for Kenneth ations Res.
man, Physics; thesis: "A IBM World Trade Corp.--Citizens, male
nt of the Fine and Hyper- & female, only who are returning to
ures of the 2(3)P States of the following countries for career as-
" Tues., Oct. 3, in Room signment: Australia, Austria, Belgium,
t 9 a.m. Chairman, R. H. Bahamas, Denmark, Finland, France,
Germany, Iran, Italy, Jamaica, Japan,
Near East Countries, Netherlands, Por-
Government Council Approval tugal, S. Africa, Switzerland, Trinidad,
llowing student sponsored Turkey, United Kingdom, Venezuela.
omes effective 24 hours after All degree levels in Econ,, Math, Phys-
ation of this notice. All pub- ics, Gen. Chem., Bus. Ad. and Engrg.
these events must be with- For Computing, Foreign Trade and
the approval has become ef- Sales.
Burroughs Corp., Jackson, Mich.-BA
request forms for student in any field plus 1 year of acctg. ex-
events are available in Room per, or courses. Sales trng., mktg. of
SAB. complete line of data processing equip.
ion, Selling bus tickets, Sept. WED., OCT. 11-
2-7, 9-4 p.m., Diag and Fish- Rike-Kumler Co., Dayton, Ohio -
Male & female. BA Econ., Gen. Lib.
of Ann Arbor Vietnam fall Arts and Soc., for Mgmt. Trng., Mer-
Crisis in America), Oct. 4. chandising.
gell-Mason Halls. THURS., OCT. 12-
A, Young Democrats, Young Union Carbide Corp., Linde Division,
s, Ann Arbor Vietnam Fall, N.Y.C.--Male & female. BA/MA Econ.,
ag, Oct. 4, 12-1 p.m., Diag. Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist., Journ.,
Math, Poli. Sci., Phys., Chem. (all
* . . fields). Computing, Mgmt. Trng., Per-
e1g71 IS1 01-S sonnel, Production, Purchasing, Sales,
Technical Writing.
owing foreign visitors can be General Foods Corp., White Plains,
hrough the Foreign Visitor N.Y.-Male & female. All degree levels
)ffice, 764-2148. Econ., Engl., Gen. Lib. Arts, Hist.,
stings, director, Council on Journ., Law, Math, Microbiol., Philo.,
ea Affairs, Sydney, Australia, Poli. Set., Psych., Speech, Soc., Bio-
chem., Chem. (all fields) for Comput-
bdulahad, professor of eco- ing, Mgmt. Trng. Res., Personnel, Pro-
rector of Business Education duction, Purchasing, Sales, Stat., R. &
Project, Al-Hikma University, D.
raq, Oct. 9-11. Brunswick Corp., Chicago, Ill. - p.m.
Mrs. Jaime Cardenas, Medel- only. BA Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts for Per-
bia, Oct. 8-15. sonnel and Territorial Sales.
Pompilus, professor of lin- Scott Paper Co., Mktg. Div., Philadel-
ate University of Haiti. (Ac- phia-Male & female. BA Arch., An-
by .interpreter, James Khaw- thro., Astro., Econ., Educ., Engl., Fine
)-12. 1 Arts, For. Languages, Gen. Lib. Arts,
educators, Osaka Prefectural Geog. Geol., Hist., Journ., Law, Math,
ducation, Japan, Oct. 10-12. Philo., Poll. Set., Psych., Speech, Soc.
Van Herbruggen, Ministry for Consumer Representatives, Sales,
ic Affairs, Brussels, Belgium, Jacobson Stores, Inc., Jackson, Mich.
-Male & female. Any degree, any ma-

jor. for Mgmt. Trng. and Merchandis-
ing.
FR[., O1CT1. 13-
Scott Paper Co., Phila.. Pa. - Male &
female. Corporate div Male & female.
For Sales and Consumer Representa-
tives.
Northwestern University, Graduate
School of Business Administration -
Male & female, a m. only. Students
in all fields interested in MBA and
PhD program in business.
Xerox Corp., Birmingham, Mich. -
p.m. only. BA Mb'A Econ., Gen. Lib.
Arts, Hist., Journ., Poli. Sci., Psych_
Speech for Inside and Territorial Sales.
Corning Glass Worbs, Corning, N.Y.
-Male & female. Bach. and PhD in
Econ., Geol., Libr. Sci., Math, Physics.
Biochem., Chem. (all fields). Comput-
ing, Library, Mktg. Res., Personnel,
Production, Sales, Stat.

I

For further information
764-7460, General Division,
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

please call
Bureau of

V OICES:

Taylor Calls Modern
Scientists 'Amateurs'

By BRIAN FORD
Because modern scientists do
not make use of the newest tech-
niques and equipment, they are
really amateurs, said Sir Geoffrey
Taylor, internationally k n o w n
fluid physicist, yesterday, in a lec-
ture in the Rackham Amphithea-
tre/
As part of "Voices of Civiliza-
tion," Taylor, the only non-Rus-
sian member of the Russian Aca-
demy of Science, spoke on "Cre-
ative -Scientists," employing six
examples to demonstrate their
value.
He said that although amateur
scientists have been looked down
upon in the past, modern amateur
scientists are held in high esteem
because of their ability to make
use of the variety of equipment
readily available to them.
Meteorologist Edward Dynes,
whom Taylor gave as his first ex-
ample, had to rely on accidental
findings of his downed balloons in
order to recover his records.
Taylor's second scientist, meteor-
ologist Cave, chased a, loose kite
with his car so that he would not
lose his records. "This type of
steeple chase never had time to
develop into a sport," Taylor said.
George Boole and his daughter,
Alice, effectively stretched their
knowledge. After teaching himself
classical languages and mathe-
matics, Boole constructed a tele-
scope and invited the public to
"view the heavens." Alice devised
a method for understanding the
concept of a four-dimensional ob-
ject when she had knowledge only
of Euclidean geometry.
The fifth amateur scientist, the
Indian mathematician Ramadj an,
developed unusual mathematical
formulas. Ramadjan's lack of a
formal university education "might
have been to his advantage," Tay-
lor said.

As a young boy, Taylor himself
disiplayed an amateur scientist's

TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following schools have recorded
vacancies for the present semester:
Albion, Mich. (Starr Commonwealth
for Boys)-Weekend recreation workers
-minimum of 2 years of college, Elem.
6th (prefer some training in spec. ed.
or recreation), Industrial Arts (electric
& small motors), Music (inst.), Bus.
Ed.
Berkley, Mich.-HS. Math, J.H. Math,
Upper Elem.
North Dearborn Hts, Mich. (River-
side H.S.)-All fields.
South Lyon, Mich.-Elem. 1st, Spec.
Ed.-Type A.
Taylor, Mich.--Sec. PE..
* * *
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB. 764-
7459.
ENGINERING PLACEMENT SERV-
ICE: Make interview appointments at
Room 128-H,, West Engineering Bldg.
OCT. 9-
Anaconda Wire & Cable Co.
Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad & As-
sociated Railroad Cos.
Borg-Warner Corp.-Marvel-Schebler
Div.
The Carborundum Co.
Commercial Solvents Corp.
Commonwealth Associates, Inc.
Cooper Tire & Rubber Co.
Dow Corning Corp.
Foster Wheeler Corp.
Kelsey-Hayes Co.
Nuclear-Chicago Corp.
The Procter & Gamble Co.
Sperry-Rand Corp.-Sperry Rand Re-
search Center.
U.S. Govt.-U.S. Air Force Officers
Trng. School.
U.S. Govt.--Navy-Naval Ordnance
Station.
OCT. 10-
Al Johnson Construction Co.
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc.
Emerson Electric Co.
The Falk Corp.
The Firestone Tire & Rubber Co.
Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corp.
The Procter & Gamble Co.
Standard Oil (N.J.)-Esso Research
& Engrg. Co.
Esso Production Res Co,, Humble Oil
& Refining Co., & Enjay Chemical Co.
Vickers, Inc.-Div. of Sperry Rand
Corp.
CINEMA II
PRESENTS
JASON
ROBARDS JR.
in
Thusand
Cowns
SHORT: CHAPTER 3
FLASH GORDON
GOES TO MARS

4

characteristics. He built a boat in really popular piece on the pro-

his bedroom, hoisted it out of his
window, and sailed it down the
Thames.
Since he retired 16 years ago,j
Taylor has done extensive work
on wave motion in thin films. Dur-
ing the question period Taylor was
asked, "What modern materials do

gram, brought the concert to a
conclusion. Although Martinon oc-
casionally gave in to the tempta-
tion of turning on the ooze, the
performance was transparent and
detailed throughout. In its closing
bars' the music became appropri-
ately frantic. Though Martinon

I

I

you prefer for your work with was brought back to the stageI

fluids?"
Taylor replied, "Water."

four times, there was no encore.
No crowd-pleaser, that Martinon!

Physicist Fock Explains
Soviet University System

E
T
S
i

By MARTIN HIRSCHMAN
The tuition free universities of
the Soviet Union were described
by Prof. Vladimir Fock of the
'University of Leningrad yester-
day at Rackham.
Fock, a noted Soviet theoreti-
cal physicist, spoke of the Uni-
versity of Leningrad's development
as a natural science-oriented in-
stitution before students and fac-
ulty as part of the "Voices of
Civilization" program.
He said that three-quarters of
the students receive a stipend
from the government so they can
continue their education. Fock
said that admission to the Uni-
versity of Leningrad is competi-
tive-from 10,000 applicants only
2000 students are admitted an-
nually. But he added that those
excluded from the University
might still prepare for a career
in science through the "high
school."
Fock is famous for his work in
atomic structure; in space, time,
and gravitation theory; in radio
waves; and in quantum mechanics.
He is presently a professor at the
University of Leningrad, a position
he has held since 1932.
Fock plans to have informal
UNION-LEAGUE

talks and meetings with interested{
members of the academic com-
munity tomorrow. Thursday he
will hold a colloquium for stu-
dents and faculty at 2 p.m. in the
Physics and Astronomy Bldg. ,roomk
182.
That night he will attend a din-
ner for the faculty of the physics
department which will be held in
the home of Prof. George W. Ford
of the physics department.
In his discussion of the Uni-
versity of Leningrad, Fock cited
the emphasis placed on educa-
tion. Following the revolution inI
1917 said Fock, the government
"did all they could for the up-
keep of the scientists at the uni-
versity." Even in the hard times
immediately after, an optical in-
stitute and an atomic energy com-
mission were set up. The Univer-
sity of Leningrad is presently un-
dergoing expansion, in order to
improve its scientific facilities, said
Fock.
Fock no longer teaches classes
at the University of Leningrad,
concerning himself with the su-
pervision of on-going research.
Teaching "takes too much time,"
he said, and noted that at 68 he
is getting old.

UM Physical Therapy Club October
meeting, Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m., Universityi
hospital, third floor conference room,
will sponsor speaker Dr. Rae, Dept. of,
Physical Medicine.
AFS Club meeting with Cliff Baacke,
Oct. 4, 7:30 p.m., Room 3A Union.
Concert Dance Organization is hold-
ing modern dance classes every Tues-
day 7:30 p.m. and Thursday 8:15 p.m..
at the Barbour Gym Dance Studio.
Classes are held for men on Thursday
at 7:30 p.m.
UAC, Social, dance and beginning
bridge lessons, Oct. 3, 7-9 p.m., 3G-3RS
Union.
Angel Flight record sale, Oct. 3-4, 7-9
p.m, North Hall.

See it with someone you love!
Shown at 8:00 Only TECHNICOLOR IJ
A:_ . .
Shown at 10:00 Onl;
(nARRm LK PR00D i -3
PLUS-"RASSLIN RAMPAGE"
COLOR CARTOON

Phone 434-0130
E~rAt On.CARPENTER ROAD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
DICK VAN DYKE
DEBBIE REYNOLDS

I

LAST DAYS! jjjLva
"HILARIOUS!!'
SEVEN ARTS PRODUCTIONS presents
99
3PO re " t "
IN COLOR 1:10-3:10-5:10-7:15-9:20
Starts Thursday
DEAN GEORGE
EARTIN PEPPARD
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLORO

I

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING THURSDAY
"A PICTURE TO
BE ENJOYED, LIVED
AND SHARED !
WORTH ANYONE'S
PRICE OF
ADMISSION!!
-New York Post
the
family
star Mussrs
HAYLEY MULS"JOHfN MILS-HYWEL BENMNT
MARJORIE RHODES IPUAL3sUGHTON'Si
TECHNICOLORQ
---FRIDAY- --
"To Sir With Love"

THIS WEEK-
THU URSDAY & FR IDAY
Te Iron Horse
fIir. John Ford, 1924
Uncut, monumental
epic on the
"Winning of the West"
SATU RDAY & SUN DAY
MARIUS TRILOGY
PART II: FANNY
W~ ne, oen undSong
fetuig R aimu
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
-STILL ONLY 5Ocm

I I Friday, Saturday
and Sunday

Use Daily Classifieds

7 and 9:15 P.M.
Auditorium A
Angell Hall 50

TONIGHT THRU THURSDAY ONLY!

I

Sr1

STARTS THURSDAY
"EXTRAVAGANTLY
BOLD and BIZARRE"
--Sos) y Crowther, N. Y. Times
"MISS ZETTERLING
MAKES EACH SCENE
A WORK OF ART.
STUNNING EFFECTS."
-William Wolf, Cu. Magazine
"THE VOYEUR'S
DELIGHT OF THE YEAR."
-Judith Crist World Journal Tribune
Night Games
Starring INGRID THULIN
DMi'IANCE RESTRICTED TO
PEaSONS OF AGE 18 MINIMUM
Mon.-Thurs. 7, 9 P.M.
Fri., Sat. 7, 9 & 11 P.M.
Sun. 6, 8 & 10 P.M.
'th

4

"HOME IS HEAVEN AND ORGIES
ARE VILE,
BUT I LIKE AN ORGY,
ONCE IN A WHILE."
Homecoming '67
October 20-21

II

BRIDGE AND
UNION-LEAGUE DANCE LESSONS

ANN ARBOR DANCE THEATRE (LASSES
MODERN TECHNIQUE
Improvisation & Composition for
Non-Dancers
Begins Wednesday, Oct. 4-7:30-9:30 P.M.
Jones School-To register, call: 665-7345
8 week course
-r" r- ~. wFrT xMVilaI MIS ,At

BEGINNING BRIDGE

$6.00 for the 12 hours
of lessons
ROOM 3G-UNION

.l

1:

r' 1

ENDING

rc7mt;-Limv I IN 1

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