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September 30, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAIGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, aEPTE ERA 30, 1967

PAc~E EIGHT TINE MICHIGA1'i DAILY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1967

NYC Schools Open;
Racial Situation Quiet.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

NEW YORK (I)-The fall term,
delayed 14 days by a teachers,
strike, opened yesterday for 1.1
million New York City public
school children. The youngsters
trudged b a c k to classrooms
through rain and mist.
Some white teachers in Negro
slums had reported threats dur-.
ing the strike, and there was fear
of a widespread move for racial
revenge against them. A number
are seeking transfers.
However, the. entire 900-school
System was reported back to near
normal -- except for one Harlem
school, which has been a target
of Negro pressure for more than
a year.
At this school, Intermediate
School 201, John Marsh, 33, a
white teacher and a chapter
chairman of the striking AFL-
CIO United Federation of Teach-
ers, was barred from entering.
Refused Screening
Marsh had refused to submit to
a "screening" process as demand-
ed by the planning board for all
of the IS 201 teachers who took
part in the strike. He had been
quoted as saying that "hate
Whitey" programs had been con-
ducted at the school during the
strike.'
As he turned away, Marsh
said: "It's deplorable. The teach-
ers who have been out on strike
will not submit to, the screening
the planning board said they will
give"
Another white teacher, Allen
Tinkler, told newsmen: "I have
my transfer in my pocketFifty
of the 55 teachers originally here

last year will be gone within a
month. The teachers that remain
are going along with the tide.
They probably feel like white
missionaries-in a black land."
IS 201 has been a hotbed of
conflict for over a year, with Ne-
gro militants attempting to seize
control of its administration. At
one point during the last school
year, they demanded the replace-
ment of principal Stanley Lisser,
white, by a Negro. Lisser current-
ly is on leave of absence and the
acting principal of the school is
a Negro, Beyrl Banfield.
PTA Pressure
At Public School 21 in Brook-
lyn's Bedford-Stuyvesant section,
five white teachers reportedly
yielded to Parent-Teachers Asso-
ciation pressures and failed to re-
port for classes. They were among
nine white teachers who went on
strike at the school.
"They did not meet the satis-
faction of the PTA," said its pres-
ident, Marie Portier, a Negro.
She said the association was bent
on ridding PS 21 of all teachers
who !struck. However, 'all class-
rooms in the school were reported
manned and the 900 pupils ap-
parently were receiving normal
instructions.
Police were stationed inside all
the city's public schools for the
opening. But Asst. School Supt.
Thomas F. Nevins reported:
"There have been no difficulties
in the vast majority of our
schools. Assistant superintendents
report everything is calm and
teaching is proceeding just as if
this were a normal day."

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity- of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

N iBldg., Mon., Oct. 2, at 8 p.m. Prof. R
Day Calendar General Noces F McCain will speak on "Nursing
Center for Continuing Education of Flu Shots: There will be a "flu shot" by Assessment
WomenSeminar-Special Orientation clinic at the Health Service, Tues., Tuskegee-Michigan Student Exchange
WomenSeminr-Spcial rienttionOct. 3, from 8-11:30 a.m. and 1-4:30Prga: owUiestofMcgn
Session for Women Students Who Are n3t Program: Now University of Mkhgan
Retuningto an Educational Program p.m. The charge is $1.50) for students students may apply for the Tuskegee-
(Undregraduate and raduate):NorthIand spouse and $2 for faculty, staff Michigan student exchange for the
(amUsgautnd Gra te): North and spouses. second semester at Tuskegee, Feb. 2 to
Campu Comons, 0 a~Tetotingm June 3, 1968. Applications for the
English Language Institute, Testing program may be obtained from John
Professional Theatre Program-Michel and Certificatio nDivision, and the Chavis or Mrs. Betty Latoszewshi in
del Ghelderode's "Pantagleize": Lydia Center for Research on Language and the Tuskegee Exchange Office, 1223
Mendelssonn Theatre, 8 p.m. Language Behavior: Seminar Confer- Angell Hall, 764-9128. The form should}
s__ence on Testing English as a Second be completed and returned to this of-
Language. 9 a.m. morning sessions and fice by Nov. 1, 1967.
University Musical Society - Chicago 1:30 p.m. afternoon sessions, Sept. 28
Symphony Orchestra-Jean Martinon, to 30 in Basement Conference Room
conductor: Hill Aud., 8:30 p.m. of City Center Bldg. Placem en

HOME ECONOMIST
Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. has excel-
lent employment and career opportunities
for a recent home economics graduate.
Opening -is available in our district office
located in Ann Arbor.
Responsibilities include lectures, demonstra-
tions, kitchen planning, and home appli-
ance calls.
The company offers modern facilities and
excellent fringe benefits.
SEND RESUME TO:
Michigan Consolidated Gas Co.
Employment and Placement
One Woodward Ave.
Detroit, Michigan 48226
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

I

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
.g~ggsgigs#g#

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB,
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica plans picnic,
Sat., Sept. 30, 2 p.m., Island Park,
food furnished. All Romance Language
instructors, students of Spanish and
Portuguese, other interested persons
cordially invited. In case of rain,
picnicwill be held Sun., Oct. 1.
Student Zionist Organization, Col-
loquium of returnees from Israel, a
view of Israel before, during and after
the war, brunch served, Sunday, 11
a.m., 1903 Washtenaw.
Hillel Kosher Ko-op meals are avail-
able; Wed. night, Oct. 4, lunch and
evening on, Oct. 5 & Oct. 6, Yom Kip-
pur fast will be broken at Hillel.
Leavername and numberat Hillel if
you are planning to eat there, also
indicate which meals you wish to
have. Call 663-4129,
* * *
Hillel Deli House shows "The Last
Chapter," Sun., 5:30 p.m.; folk danc-
ing at Hillel, Sun., 2-4 p.m.; Elemen-
tary Hebrew, Tues., 7 p.m.; Advanced
Hebrew, Tues,, 8:45 p.m.
*MN

Bldg. Coffee, conversation, Hispanic
music, everyone interested invited,
* * *
Bach Club holds meeting; lecture-
recital by Jane Hettrick on "Bach's
Organ Music?" Wed., Oct. 4, 8 p.m.
at Dr. Mason's Studio, 2110 School of
Music. Meet at 7:45 p.m. at Guild
House. 802 Monroe, if you need trans-
portation.
* * *
AFS Club meeting Oct. 1, 6 p.m.,
Room 3A Union, For questions call
761-6133,
Alpha Kappa Lambda receipt of na-
tional improvement award, Oct. 1, at
the Alpha Kappa Lambda leadership
conference.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., sponsors speaker: Dr.
Franklin Norman, "The Doctor's Dilem-
ma Regarding Life and Death," Sun.,
Oct. 1, 7 p.m.
Communication Sciences Lecture Se-
ries sponsors Prof. T. Dobzhansky, fa-
incus geneticist of the Rockefeller In-
stitute, will hold an informal discus-
sion, Oct. 3, 4:10 p.m., Room 3R Un-
ion.

Directed Teaching Interviews in Sec-
ondary Education for Winter Termn,
1968, Applicants: We are now mailing
out the appointment times for the,
assignment interview, Failure to come
in for the interview at the designated
time means loss of your spot for stu-
dent teaching in winter, 1968. Please
register your change of address with
us so that we can get in touch with
you. Room 2292, Universit yHigh School,
764-8402,
TV Center Program: On Sun., Oct.
1, the following program produced by
the TV Center will have its initial
telecast in Detroit:
12 Noon, WWJ-TV, Channel 4 -
"The Canterbury Tales. The Shipman's
Tale." Chaucer's tale of a merchant,
his wife and a monk is dramatized,
then analyzed by Prof. Thomas Gar-
baty.
Members of the Women's Research
Club: First meeting of the year in
West Conference Room, Rackham

POSITION OPENINGS:
Edsel B. Ford Institute for Medical
Research, Detroit, Mich.-Div. of Nu-
clear Spectroscopy and Radiation Phys.,
Dept. of Physics needs three Physicists
or Chemists, BA/MA level degrees, new
grad or exper., prepare radioactive
sources and research in absorptiometry
and X-ray diffraction.
Avco Corp., Lycoming Div., Stratford,
Conn.-Executive, admin. and tech, per-
sonnel of varied degrees an ddisciplines
and exper. levels. Major supplier of
gas turbine engines, Manuf. Mgmt.,
Manuf. Engrg., Industrial Engrg., Ma-
terial/Production Control, Research &
Dev. Engrg., Product. Service, Quality
Control, Acctg. and Purchasing.
Naval War College, Newport, R.I. -
Two positions on library staff. Supv.
libr., Tech. Processes Branch, GS-11
and Cataloging libr., GS-9 position. File
form 57. available at Bureau, booklet
available,
* * *.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.

LAST CHANCE!

EXPO,'67

$7900

You 'mean,
because I'm a student
or teahrI get
special rates at all
Hilton Hotels In the U.S.?
I Hilton Hotels Corporation,
National Sales Office, Palmer House, I
Chicago 90, Ill.
I Please send the Faculty-Student I
Rate Brochure that tells all, .
I am a Faculty Member Q Student Q]
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Hillel Foundation, Rosh
ices; Wed., Oct. 4, 7:30

Hashono serv-I
p.m.; Oct. 5,
9:30 a.m., at

October 13-October 15
See Expo before it closes; this is
the event of the decade.
The price includes:
* ROUND TRIP AIR TRANSPORTATION

9:a m;Fri Ot.6,
Young Friends plan discussion and Rackham Lecture Hall.
dinner, Oct. 1, 5:30 p.m., Friends
1Uoti i n, oue

California Democrats Plan
Anti-Johnson Primary Slate

LONG BEACH, Calif. (P)-The
I i b e r a l California Democratic
Council, feuding with party regu-
lars, began a militantly anti-
Vietnam war meeting yesterday
aimed at forming a Democratic
National Convention peace dele-
gation opposed to President John-
son.
Gerald Hill, president of the
33,000-member volunteer group,
predicted the special convention
would approve formation of a
slate to challenge an expected
pro-Johnson slate in California's
June primary.
"I'm sure we'll choose a peace
delegation and we'll win with it
in the June primary," Hill told
reporters.
But Democratic National Com-
mitteeman E u g e n e Wyman,
speaking for the official party
commented: "A so-called peace
delegation is harmful in that it
tends to divide our party at a
time when we should be united."
Makeup of the proposed dele-
gation is undecided, but party
officials agreed on one thing: the

slate will not contain any of
California's big names, such as
former Democratic Gov. Edmund
G. Brown, Assembly Speaker Jesse
M. Unruh, Los Angeles Mayor
Samuel W. Yorty and Wyman.
All back the President.
However, the peace - minded
council members-not pledged to
any specific candidate-will pose
a major problem for Johnson in
California. The recent non-partf-
san State Poll said 39 per cent of
California Democrats would sup-
port a peace delegation, 42 per
cent would back the President and
the rest were undecided.
TV RENTALS
$10 PER MONTH
FREE service and delivery

Iutug ms
. * ;University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Unitarian Universalist Student Re- Washtenaw, holds services, Sun., Oct.
ligious Liberals, picnic on Sun., Oct. 1 1, 9:45 & 11:15 a.m., worship service
at Dexter-Huron Park. Leave from1 with Pastor Scheips speaking on
the First Unitarian Church, 1917 Wash- "Praising God through Social Justice."
tenaw, 2 p.m. Do not bring food but do ( 11:15 a m.,Bible class continues dis-
bring sports equipment. Members of all cussion on "Key Doctrines of thej
denominations welcome. Reformation" with emphasis on the
* n m. forgiveness of sins, 6 p.m. Fellowship
UM Physical Therapy Club October supper, 6:45 p.m., film about mentally
meeting, Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m., University retarded children, "Bridge to a Wider
Hospital, third floor confeernee room, World."
will sponsor speaker Dr. Rae, Dept. of
Physical Medicine , Guild House, Monday noon luncheon,
* * * speaker, Oct. 3, 12-1 p.m:, 802 Monroe.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Una reunion, Tuesday noon symposium on "Con-
Mon., Oct. 2, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze flict."

0
0
0

MOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
EXPO PASSPORTS
EXPO GU I DEBOOK
Limited Reservations, So HURRY!

CALL
JOHN GUNNING
761-1907
OR
STUDENT TOURS
20930 Mack, Grosse Pointe Woods
886-0844

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HOME ADDRESS-

nviv C ML/L

STREET

CITY STATE
COLLEGE NAME
STREET CITY STATE

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SUNDAY, October 1
at the PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER,
1 432 Washtenow

6 P.M.

-= m - -= -- - - --- - -

- - - -

"THE MISSION ON THE CHURCH
IN A SECULAR AGE"
PAUL DOTSON, Director of the Presbyterian Campus Ministry
and the Ecumenical Campus Center
a Supper-Discussion (50c)
Reservations appreciated: 662-3580 or 665-6575

WORSHIP

I'

N EJAC TV
RENTALS
662-5671

.

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f__
2

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

"LSD AND RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE"
PROFESSOR EDMUND ANDERSON, Ph.D.
Research Chemist, Univ. of Illinbis
Lecture and Discussion-7 P.M.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
(E. Huron at Fletcher)

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt,
W. C. Wright

Armin C.

Bizar,

One plus one - campus pzazz
Knit for our individual
tastes with Orionl

9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIS I
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all services-Call
NO 2-2756.
I ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.--Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
S11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Folk Mass.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William
Rev. Terry N. Smith
9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-Church Service. Ser-
mon Topic: "The Table-A Link Not a
Barrier."
9:15 and 11:00 a.m.-Church School Class-
es. Nursery through junior high.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
Dr. Morris Wee,.Guest Preacher.
7:00 p.m.-Dr. Franklin Norman, Minneap-
olis, Minn. "Ethical and Moral Problems
Facing the Modern Doctor."
TUESDAY
7:15 p.m.--History of the Lutheran Church.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-Coffee Presession.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"Maybe You CAN Take It with
You!'
7:00 p.m.-Evening Service and Communion
{ Ordinance.
8:30 p.m.-College and Careers Fellowship.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State arid Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School and Alpha Omega
Fellowship.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible, you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Donald Postema, Minister
10:00 a.m.---Worship Service. Sermon: "Who
Started All This Anyway?"
I11:00 a.m.-Coffee.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-World Wide Communion. Ser-
mon: "The Blood." Guest Minister, Rev.
Suksan Chung of Hapdong Presbyterian
Church in Korea.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt ,Paul Swets

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services,
Sermon by Pastor Scheips, "Praising God
Through Social Justice."
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper
and Program, Movie "Bridge to a- Wider
World."
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devo-
tion, Holy Communion, Pastor Arthur
Spaine r.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m., and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At -State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services.
Dr. Rupert: "Christianity Is More Than a
Death Cult."
7:00 p.m. - Fellowship Program, Wesley
Lounge. Open House with discussion on
"The Draft,"
TUESDAY
12:00 noon - Discussion Class, Pine Room.
"20th Century Christianity," Dr. Ran-
som. Lunch 25c.
5:Q0 p.m.-ChurchRelated Vocations Group,
Green Room. Dinner and program.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
7:30 a.m. - Fellowship Breakfast, Pine
Room. Out in time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon - Discussion Class, Pine Room.
"20th Century Poverty," Rev. Beavin.
Lunch 25c.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.--Young Marrieds, Pine Room,
Dinner and program, "War Game" a film.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY

I

Campus-wCut to
Campus .Fashion.
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unmistakable look of traditional fashion. Because each group of
Jaymar Slacks is color-cued to coordinate with your favorite
blazer, shirt or sweater. What's more, with every Jaymar Slack you
get features like Ban-Role, to keep your waistband from curling
So tomorrow, instead of looking at one pair of brown slacks to
match your blazer, look at a pair of brown plaids and a brown
check, as well. Try two .. . you'll be glad to buy two! And you'll
look twice as good, to boot! Slim into a pair of pairs today!

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9:30 a.m.-Collegiate Classes.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Service: "Sin and For-
giveness." Speaker, Dr. Malefty. Com-
munion Service.
5:30 p.m.-Collegiate Supper and Discussion.
7:00 p.m.-"LSD and Religious Experience."
Speaker: Prof. Edmund Anderson, Research
Chemist, Univ. of Illinois.

1TA NA V

Dacron polyester/wool-$15.95

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