100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 30, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

if

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1967

THE MICHIG AN DAILY

PAGE THREE

Viet Group
Still To Vote
On Elections
Thieu Jails Election
Opponent; Buddhists
Hold Demiionstrations
By The Associated Press
SAIGON - Faced with Bud-
dhist protest demonstrations, the
newly-elected government of Nyu-
gen Van Thieu awaits confirma-
tion by the 17-man special com-
mittee of the Provisional Assem-
bly. The deadline for confirma-
tion is Monday at midnight.
The assembly's special election
committee met into the late hours
yesterday to consider whether to
recommend that the assembly
validate Thieu's election. The full
assembly has until midnight Mon-
day to decide.
Various sources said a majority
of the 17 committee members
favored invalidating the election
on the ground there were irregu-
larities. But late last night the
Committee had not completed its
report.
When the assembly was pass-
ing on candidates for the presi-
dential election last July, a spe-
cial election committee refused to
recommend the ticket of Thieu
and his vice presidential running
mate, Premier Nguyen Cao Ky.
But the assembly validated their
candidacy nevertheless.
Earlier this week another in-
vestigating group, the Central
Election Council, on the basis
of its study of formal complaints
of election irregularities submit-
ted by defeated candidates, voted
to recommend that the assembly
validate the election. The coun-
cil's report said it could find no
evidence to support the charges.
Militant Buddhists began their
antigovernment demonstration in
the streets of Saigon this morn-
ing in the face of a crackdown by
the military government on the
activities of Buddhists and other
dissenters.
An estimated 500 robed monks
headed from four places toward
Independence Palace where the
militant Buddhist leader Thich
Tri Quang is staging a protest
vigil.
No disorders were reported in
the new Buddhist demonstration.
-Chief of State Nguyen Van
Thieu rejected demands made on
his regime by the radical Bud-
dhist splinter group headed by
Thich Tri Quang.
Police arrested lawyer Truong
Dinh Dzu, a vociferous critic of
the military government who ran
second to Theiu in the presiden-
tial election. Then they prevented
Dzu's followers from holding a
news conference called to protest
the arrest.
The leader of the militant Bud-
dhists, Tri Quang, continued a
protest vigil. He vowed to remain
until Thieu answered his de-
mands that Thieu rescind a new
Buddhist c h a r t e r issued by
government decree last July.
The new charter angered the
militants, who have been trying
for years to exert political influ-
ence, because it recognized a
moderate sect as the official Bud-
dhist church of South Vietnam.
Tri Quang and four other monks
sat down in the park Thursday
night after they led 1,000 monks
and nuns on a protest march to
the gates of the palace.
Thieu issued a statement yes-
terday in which he spoke of the
government's "unflinching posi-
tion of never interfering in the
internal a f f a i r s of religious

groups." 1

Democrats
Fear Large
Budget Cuts
Leaders Call Caucus;
McCormick Wants
GOP Cuts Clarified
WASHINGTON ()-Democratic
House leaders moved yesterday to
unify their ranks for next week's
showdown with Republicans over
who will call the signals for bud-
get-cutting.
Speaker John W. McCormack,
(D-Mass), meanwhile, called on
GOP economy advocates to give
their recommendations to the
House Appropriations Committee
on what funds should be chopped.
"The Republicans should appear
before the Appropriations Com-
Inittee and set forth in detail where
-Associated Press the cuts should be made," McCor-
mack told reporters.
Rep. Frank T. Bow of Ohio,
senior Republican on the Appro-
flood the city priations Committee, said GOP
major routes members "have suggested hun-
dreds of places where cuts could
be made.
"In almost every instance we
have been outvoted by the Dem-
ocrat majority on the committee,
and the majority has refused to
undertake major revisions of the
budget," he added.

NEW STRATEGY.
U.S. To Increase Inventory
Of Warheads by Five Times
WASHINGTON (A)-The United no evidence the Soviets have come It means that more American
States has made a historic deci- up with multiple warheads al- warheads will be targeted against
sion to expand its force of missile- though it is assumed they are giv- cities and installations in Com-
carried offensive warheads to more ing such an effort high priority.|munist China, whose growing nu-
than 7,500 in the next five years, Some officials believe it will be clear capability was a major factor
it was learned yesterday, a few years before Russia has its' in the U.S. decision to erect a mis-
This figure is conservative. The own MIRV. sile defense.
precise planned level of warheads This is the "sheer exhaustion" The staggering increase in U.S
ventory-is tp secret. approach-firing more missiles warheads will be possible with-
The ometou "qantm jmp"than antimissiles can intercept- out raising the numbers of mis-
The momentous "quantum jump" mentioned earlier this year by Dr. u asn h ubr fms
in missilery, as Pentagon scientists John Sd Faster the Penbtagon' . siles now deployed. Instead of one
describe it, will be made possible chief scientist, i testimony be- bomb atop each rocket U.S. scien-
through the introduction of a fore Congress. tists will place several.
technological breakthrough known______-_ -
as MIRV-the multiple individual-
ly guided re-entry vehicle. oir more
simply, the multiple warhead. omney Backs Requested
The implications of the move,
which must rank with the land- 'H"
mark decision to build a $5 bil-.Department Probe
lion antimissile defense, are far-
rahing
Deployment of multiple war- LANSING (R)) - Gov. George Romney, who was in Boston
heads means that the Soviet Un- Romney said yesterday he will yesterday nearing the end of his
ion, which has largely ignored support a State Highway Com- 20-day look at the nation's trou-
U.S. urgings to agree to a curb or mission request for a grand jury bled urban areas, said he plan-
halt of the nuclear arms race, will investigation of alleged wrongdo- ned to confer early next week
be staring down the barrel of nu- ing in the State Highway Depart- with Attorney General Frank
clear shotguns by the early 1970s. ment. Kelley and Highway Commission
It means the Russia that Nikita In a statement released by the Chairman Ardale Ferguson.
' Khrushchev once boasted could executive office, Romney said he At the same time, Kelley's of
hit a fly in space would be con- is prepared to support any addi- fice said the attorney general will
fronted with not one but many tional steps which will bring about petition for a grand jury if an
warheads in event of war. a complete investigation of such investigation indicates the need
Pentagon officials say there is allegations. for one.

FLOOD WATERS

I.

Twenty-eight hours of rain caused the Allegheny River to overflow its banks and
of Salamanca, New York. The rain, nearly 5 inches, caused traffic difficulty along
in southwestern New York.
LETTER TO THANT:
Pope Asks 'New Initiative
TO End Vietnamese Conf

3
L
t
°

i ct

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (P)-
Pope Paul VI, in a letter made
public here yesterday at his sug-
gestion, offered to help UN ,Sec-
retary-General U Thant in an ef-
fort to end the Vietnam war. The
pontiff spoke hopefully of "new
initiatives" under way or planned
to establish a basis for peace.
. But a spokesman at the Vatican
said the hopeful tone of the Sept.
22 letter had been superseded by
the Soviet Union's newly an-
nounced decision to send more
arms to the Hanoi Communist
regime.

A high Vatican source said the
message was sent the day before
the Soviet Union announced it
had signed agreements to supply
North Vietnam with planes, guns,
missiles and other weapons in
1968.
The Vatican noted that in an
address the Pope made from his
window last Sunday, he had re-
ferred to recent signs of hope for
a peaceful settlement. The Pope
at that time went on to say: "In-
stead, we now have the sad pros-
pect of new armaments and new!
fighting."

The letter from the Vatican did
not elaborate on what new peace
initiatives the Pope referred to.
Diplomats and U.S. Secretary of
State Dean Rusk professed to have
heard of none.
The letter expressed hope that
the current General Assembly ses-
sion "will advance toward finding
a peaceful and honorable solution
to the conflict."
Vietnam is not on the assembly's'
agenda, but in speeches since the
assembly session opened two weeks
ago there have been numerous ap-
peals for peace in Vietnam. The
Pope's message was seen as in-
creasing pressure for the United
Nations to take an active role inI
halting the war.

Next week's immediate issue is
the second attempt by Democrats
to pass a stopgap appropriations
measure and block a Republican
move ordering President Johnson
to make at least $5 billion in cuts
without telling him where to do it.
But leaders concede that the
more basic question at stake is
whether the Democratic leader-
ship, with a 274-186 papers mar-
gin, will be able to keep control
of the House or lose it to Repub-
licans aided by dissident Southern
Democrats.
To meet the GOP challenge,
Democrats called an unusual party
caucus for Tuesday morning, the
first such meeting since January
and something virtually unheard
of in recent years except on or-
ganizational matters.
Some assistant Democratic whips
have been urging a caucus for sev-
eral weeks to pull the party to-

t
t
t
r
i

Arab Diplomat Accuses
U.S. of Backing Israel

E
si
J
b
is
ri
E
t
h
b
a

World News Roundup

UNITED NATIONS, NY. (P)-
gyptian Foreign Minister Mah-
moud Riad charged yesterday that
ince the Israeli-Arab war of last
une, the United States has gone
back on a commitment by Pres-
ient Johnson to support the ter-
itorial integrity of all Middle
astern countries.
'Special Responsibility'
He said it had "adopted a posi-
ion of alignment with Israel and
hostility toward the Arab people."
He told the UN General Assem-
ly that "the United States bears
special responsibility in this
ituation as a result of its exten-
ive assistance to Israel-political-
y. militarily and economically."
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg, speaking in reply to
Riad, rejected the foreign min-
ster's charge of undue U.S. aid to
srael.
He said it was a "plain and
imple fact" that U.S. aid to the
Arab countries "has been farl
- -

greater" than that to Israel.
He added it was "unshaken and
unshakeable American policy that
we respect the right of all nations
to live and we expect all nations
to respect the right of other na-
tions to live.
"Live and let live is the pre-
scription for peace in the Middle
East."
Condemn Israeli Aggression
Speaking in the 122-nation as-
sembly's general policy debate,
Riad said the assembly's first duty
was to adopt "appropriate resolu-
tions condemning Israeli aggres-'
sion, securing the withdrawal of
aggressive forces and providing
compensation for the crimes and
damages caused by the aggres-
sion."
Riad declared Israel was asking
for direct Israeli-Arab negotia-
tions so as "to negotiate the Arab
states into acquiescence to the re-
sults of its expansionist and ag-
gressive policy."

After Commission Vote
The response from Romney and
Kelley followed passage of a res-
olution Thursday in which the
commission asked Romney to take
steps to cause a grand jury in-
vestigation of the Highway De-
partment.
The commission also asked
Romney to support its efforts to
clarify allegations of scandal in
the department and that they oc-
curred before the present commis-
sion took office in November,
1964.
Kelley said he has asked the
commission to appear in his of-
fice Monday to report to him any
information it has which could
lead to, a petition for a grand
jury.
No Need Earlier
The attorney general's office
investigated the department ear-
lier this year and reported it
found no need for a grand jury
investigation.
Kelley will ask specifically
what has changed. the commis-
sioners' position since Aug. 8
when they said they agreed with
the report and agreed that a
grand jury probe was not neces-
sary, a spokesman for the attor-
ney general said.

By The Associated Press
OTTAWA-Canada will appeal
to North Vietnam to stop sending
arms into South Vietnam if the
United States stops bombing North
Vietnam, Foreign Secretary Paul
Martin said yesterday.
He was replying to a question
in the House of Commons. He
said the only way to test Hanoi's
willingness to open peace nego-
tiations is to stop the bombing.
He added that he was not enun-
ciating new Canadian policy when
he called in the United Nations
Wednesday for an unconditional
halt in the bombing; it was merely
the first time the policy had been
stated publicly.
TOKYO-Premier Chou En-lai
told Vietnamese Communists at a
Peking banquet yesterday that
Communist China will give them
"more effective support and aid
in their war against U.S. aggres-
sion," the New China News Agency
reported.
The Soviet Union signed an
agreement last Saturday with
North Vietnam for military and
economic aid to Hanoi in 1968,
including planes, artillery and
rockets. There were hints that the
Russian outlay would exceed that
for this year, estimated at $1 bil-
lion.

HARLINGEN, Tex. - The Rio'
Grande unexpectedly speeded its
crest toward Brownsville and Ma-
tamoros Friday. It left countless
upriver U.S. and Mexican residents
fighting disease and high water
and trying to dry their soggy
homes and furnishings.
The State Police director said
Rio Grande Valley residents who
fled inland from Hurricane Beulah
and her winds and floods could re-
turn home yesterday.

A high U.S. source told reporters gether after a series of setbacks s
privately Thursday that there had on the floor. r s
been no recent peace feeler from On Wednesday, the House re- 13
Hanoi either directly or indirectly. jected 202 to 182 a proposal to
continue spending for departments C
A spokesman for Rusk said the which have not gotten their money R
United States had no advance for this year, with 34 Democrats i
word of the Pope's communication joining 168 Republicans in the I
but that President Johnson's ad- majority. In addition, 31 Dem-
ministratiop. would study it care- ocrats were absent compared with s
fully when a copy was received. only 18 Republicans.A
He said Rusk was puzzled by the --- -- -----
reference to new peace initiatives

now going in; so far as Rusk knew,
there was none.

H I LL EL GRADUATE COMMITTEE
Presents
FALL PICNIC
Sunday, October 1
It may be cold-bring a sweater-or it may be hot)
Football, Volleyball, Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, etc.
ISLAND PARK-1 P.M.-or meet at Hillel 12:30
Hillel Affiliates 75c Others $1
ALL ARE WELCOME

-l
-- ?

9330 Maynard
TONIGHT and SUNDAY
Ticket sales at
7:30 P.M.-$1.75S
F RE E EATS
'AIM BUCKLEY
At DISCOUNT RECORDS-Today-State St., 1 P.M.; S. Univ., 2 P.M.

TONIGHT AT:

II

The ARK Coffee #uje
1421 Hill Street
8 :30 P.M.
THE P.F.'s
AVANT-GARDE JAZZ QUARTET
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments

Mi i

I,

m

WO

I

FINAL PERFORMANCES!
Tonight at 8:00 P.M.-Sunday at 2:30 & 8:00 P.M.

m

|

OPENS TUESDAY!

HOWE
NOW

0

Support Writer-in-Residence

i

I

Return by popular demand,
MACBIRD
by Barbara Garson
Read by Donald Hall Players

...... -.,- -.- -..... ...t4 r ,- : .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan