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September 29, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-29

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1967

11 SX1EMIHGNDIY RDY ETEBR2,16

ii I

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Y 1 "H . i4"::x 2. MICHIFISH:
Billboard

4

Than Just Show

I, -'

The Michigan rugby club will
play the Chicago Lions tomor-
row at 3 p.m. on Wines Field.
The ruggers will then host the
University of Toronto A and B
teams Sunday, with the games
beginning at 1:30 and 3 p.m.
respectively.

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
There is a movement afloat on
this campus dedicated to the ad-
vancement of synchronized swim-
ming.
The name of this unique organ-
ization is Michifish, and, though
little publicized, it has become a

tradition on campus. Its most C college and high school girls. Thea
notable project is the annual first such clinic will be held Nov.
Spring Swim Show, this year 18, and features the Petersburg
scheduled for March 29-31. Ornamental Swim Club, under the
Last y e a r 's program. "On direction of Pansy Forbes.
Stage," included water adaptations The two other major activities
of "Sound of Music" and "Sweet
Charity" as well as Macbehth's on the Michifish agenda for this

T IE VANDALS
AND THE
]BOKENR E AD
*iHowardeohn
..i aie

4

0

I!

I

Don't Be Uninformed
Get. the.

three witches and a Keystone
Cops number.
That was the last Michifish
show for sponsor Patricia Dau-
gert, a position filled this year by
Miss Joyce Lindeman, whom
Michifish president Cindy Kin-
caid calls an "excellent, well-
known AAU coach." Miss Linde-
man returns to a teaching posi-
tion at the University after spend-
ing last year at Western Mich-
igan University. While in Kala-
mazoo she co-coached the West-
ern Water Sprites, the synchron-
ized swim club there.
In keeping with their policy of
better synchronized swimming, the
club each year offers clinics for

year, besides the swim show, are
the Intercollegiate Meet and the
International Academy of Aquatic
art.
a Competitionbat the Intercollegi-
ate Meet, to be held in April at
the University of Indiana, is in
two categories: stunts and rou-1
tines. Stunts are judged on ex-
cellence of performance; routines
are done in solo, duets, trios and
teams.
The International Academy of
Aquatic Arts, located in DeKalb,
Ill., was begun in 1954 by Henry
Gundling and his wife Buela to
further synchronized swimming as
an art form. Ratings are given to
participating clubs and criticism
for improvement is offered.

I

'.e .o xl xn e

M' Cage Hopefuls:
A Sneak Preview

and living in Tuscaloosa

Delivered

-.------------ --------------1
I I
1 I
INAMF _____
II
ADDRESS- __
- .-----.____ ---...-I
I Weekday -i Sunday Both [-]
I I
Send to. Box 241, Ann Arbor, Michigan
or callI
761-9859I
..--.....-.- .-----------

By DAN STEINHARDT
The guards are sharpshooters,
the forwards are quick and agile,
but for the fourth straight year
the Michigan freshman basketball
squad falls into a centerless pit.
"Led by three all-state players,
the team has fine talent, but we
will be unable to fill the void
created by the graduation of Craig
Dill and the lack of any center
material on the varsity," explain-
ed freshman coach George Pom-
mey.
Top Three
Heading this year's squad will
be Rodney Ford, Dan Fife and
Tom Lundstedt.
Ford, a highly sought forward
from Hammond, Indiana, averaged
20 points a game as a senior and
had offers from Purdue, Indiana,
and Minnesota. At 6'4" and 185
lbs. Ford is extremely agile, hooks
with either hand, and is an excel-
lent jumper.
* Fife, from Clarkston, Michigan,
is a 6'2", 180 lb. guard, who aver-
aged 32 points 14 rebounds, and
8 assists per game as a senior. Fife

Delivery ONLY to dorms and
faculty offices on weekdays.
Home delivery on Sundays.

had offers from Michigan State,
Wisconsin, and Kentucky.-
The third all-stater, Lundstedt
is from Mt. Prospect, Illinois, the
same area as George Romney. A
6'4", 190 lb. forward, Lundstedt
is one of the most accurate shoot-,
ers on the freshmen squad and
was all-state for two years,
Other Notables
Also of note for the freshman is
Mike Rafferty, a 6'3" guard-for-
ward who led his Birmingham
Groves team to a; high ranking in
Class A Michigan high school bas-
ketball last year.
Tim Nicksic, a 6'6", 210-pounder
from E. Chicago, Indiana, who
will probably play center, is a pro-
duct of the teachings of Bobby
Cantrell. Nicksic has the same
fiery playing style as his ex-coach,
who sparked Michigan to the
NCAA semi-finals during Cazzie
Russell's sophomore year.
The remaining basketball tend-
ers were given to Bob Bruns, a 6'3",
185 lb. player from Elgin, Illinois;
Mark Berg, a 6' guard from Dal-
ton, Ohio; and John Mayberry, a
superb forward from Detroit whose
tender was voided when he signed
to play baseball with the Houston
Astros.
Practice will open for these and
other freshmen hopefuls on Octo-
ber 15. On the basis of previous
experience, other good prospects
should appear to join the "tender-
ed." And with the small number
of scholarships given, many a
hopeful will be given a chance.

The noble art of losing face
May one day save the human race
And turn into eternal merit
What weaker minds would call disgrace.
-Piet Hein
Duffy Daugherty, despite his notice that Michigan State isn't
pointing toward Notre Dame and isn't going to overlook any team
on the schedule, is having trouble convincing people that he ever
saw a schedule.
George Romney, despite his "brain-washing" ploy, is having
trouble convincing people that he ever had a brain.
No one seems sacred anymore.
No one except Herr Bryant, coach of Alabama's crimson Tide.
Herr has always stood for truth, justice and the American
Way.
Herr has never settled for anything less than total victory.
He figures he shouldn't have to.
Last winter he bought a meat packinghouse in a Catholic
Alabama community. Within a week, the Pope decreed that tuna
fish casserole on Friday's was no longer the Catholic way.
Devotees keep plugging Herr for
President. But he's never settled
for secondbest.
"If you hear of me running for
office, you'll know something's
gone wrong," he says.
It will mean that divine law
is really dead.
In a meeting of Southern gov-
ernors a few years back, George
Wallace was bragging about Ala-
bama to Orval Faubus of Ar-
kansas.
Replied Faubus, "There are two
reasons why Alabama is doing so
well. First, you've got a port, Mo-
bile. And second you have an Ar-
kansas man, Paul Bryant."
Alabama is more than proud of
Herr.
When Lurleen and George
spoke at an Crimson Tide pep
rally last week, nearly 10,000
of the flower of Alabama youth
gathered. .HERR
There wasn't a beard or a hippie mop in the entire crowd.
There wasn't a Negro either.
As the band played "On Alabama," the kids stomped and
yelled. Several rolls of white toilet paper unraveled in the air.
"We're not recruiting Negro athletes. That's a policy decision for
others to make," Herr says.
Football is a tradition with Herr. An American tradition.
"It's not just a game. It's a life. It teaches discipline, sacrifice
and hard work," preaches Herr.
Marine boot camp sergeants say much the same thing.
Herr admits that football has been profitable for him.
However, he's returned kindness for kindness at Alabama. His
game supports the school's athletic program, pumps $50,000 a year
into the university, budget, is paying for an indoor swimming pool
and a new fieldhouse and had a half million left over two years ago
to donate to the engineering school.
Herr knows what it takes to stay alive in modern football.
When quarterback Kenny Stabler became involved in academic
and legal difficulties last spring and this summer, Herr judiciously
placed him on probation.
But halfway through last Saturday's game, as Herr watched his
Tide slowly being beached, he quickly reinstated Stabler.
Stabler was, though, only human and managed but a 37-37 tie
with Florida State.
It was the first time in his last 18 games that Herr hadn't won.
After the game, he put the blame right where it belonged-on the
players.
Said Herr, "This is the worst defensive team I've ever had."
Then he pointed to a sign he keeps in his office:
"Winning isn't everything, but it sure beats anything that
comes in second."
Heil!

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TONI

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Return by popular demand,
*MACBIRD
by Barbara Garson
Read by Donald Hall Players
NION BALLROOM 8:30 P.N
Saturday, September 30
Tickets $1.50

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