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August 29, 1967 - Image 31

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 29, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDA, AUGUT 29,u_, ifj vs MICU YfAN tu.v

.r enr ririr lrn i um.rn

CLARK NORTON
low &tikin9 Out_
Multiversity Athletics:
Bureaucracy on a
Basketball Court

Track Boasts Returning Lettermen

As an out-of-state student, I'm often asked why
attend the University of Michigan.

I decided to

Usually sticking to the insane stock reply "It's a good school,"
I find it's, also helpful to acquire a puzzled expression like "You
expected Harvard, maybe?" Actually it's the only place I applied, so
what could I do.
However, being sports editor and thus especially image-con-
scious (People wonder what I think Socrates batted in 1929, or
if I think Pablo Casals plays a pretty good right end) I never
bother to add that one of Michigan's primary attractions for me
as a young, sportsminded high school graduate (Let's see, Soc-
rates ... uh, I think it was .257, but isn't Casals a halfback?) was
its national reputation as an athletic power.
You might say that I was (in effect) recruited by Cazzie Russell.
(Hmmm . . . that's a good one to tell my grandchildren.)
But in all likelihood few of this year's incoming freshmen, with
the possible exception of New York Mets' fans, found themselves
irresistably drawn to the University of Michigan by recent Wolverine
athletic accomplishments. There is good reason for this, and perhaps
I should assure those new students who may well be unaware of it
that Michigan does, indeed, have a national reputation in athletics.
But probably just as few have come to Ann Arbor expecting
to spend fall Saturday afternoons studying in the dorm alongside
that bespectacled kid down the hall who wears white socks and,
well, gets a 4.0, but obviously doesn't know what he's missing.
Naturally I'm talking about a Michigan football game.
Where else but at the Stadium can one see all his friends, even
if they are kind of one big blur.
Where else can one sense that incomparable feeling of school
spirit that spontaneously erupts when a trousered cheerleader cries
out, "Throw me an apple!"?
Where else can one thrill to ithe strains of a teeming horde of
high schoolers blaring away, except at "Band Day'?
And if the team has a good season, we all might be able to
go to California over Christmas vacation.
For those who like football itself, that's there, too. Kind of an
extra added attraction between sips.
However, it's important not to confuse the Michigan athletic
scene with that which might be found in a typical "B" movie, star-
ring of course Ronald Reagan as the "State" coach who always ldses
but sure is nice, featuring massive torchlight pep rallies with girl
cheerleaders and pom-poms of all things, and focusing ,on the hand-
some quarterback who fights off whatever forces of evil happen to
be lurking behind the soda fountain to win campus-wide admiration
and Reagan as a father-in-law. (I forgot to mention he has a beau-
tiful daughter.)
That's all very nice for a small campus, but this is the Big Time.
Most of you will never recognize Michigan's quarterback if
and when you pass him on the street. (Sorry, Dick) You may
often wonder just who those guys are out there who are playing
sports for the University of Michigan. Sometimes you'll care less.
As with everything else in the Multiversity, athletics can be
mightly impersonalized.
In high school, you probably knew most of the athletes on a
first-name basis. You may have been one yourself. In most cases
you lived next door to them, went to class with them, grew up with
them. It wasn't hard to get fired up about rooting for the kid down
the block, And if he won, you could identify with him.
At the University of Michigan, you may get to know a few
athletes. You may be one of the few who makes it himself. But if
you're not on scholarship, better think about buying a ticket.
You may find it a little tougher to root for guys who are getting
paid, be it ever so legal and honorable, to play for your school.
They've come from all over the country, most having been
recruited by college scouts who had to "sell" them on the Univer-
sity. Some of them would never have been admitted under normal
circumstances, but they've been begged to come with the expec-
tation that they will in turn "sell" the University, especially at
the ticket office.
That's all very nice for a big corporation, but whatever hap-
pened to Ronald Reagan (note the clever dual meaning) and com-
pany?
Personally, I'm not interested in torchlight pep rallies or parades
down Main Street. (Girl cheerleaders may be a different story.)
But it is unfortunate that athletics at Michigan has not been
able to satisfactorily provide the unifying spirit so needed on an
impersonalized campus.
Who wants to root for General Motors, Univac, or H. L. Hunt.
Michigan teams can't even ditch their corporate image by inept
performances on the field. All you have then is Univac with a
cough.
The big losers are the students, who are expected to pay the
highest admission prices in the Big Ten and then work themselves
into a frenzy for the old Maize and Blue. Small wonder that many
prefer to read about the game in the paper or not bother with it
at all. Other than football, which is considered a social event, no
sport at Michigan can claim an avid following, year after year.
Other losers are the athletes and the coaches, who are seldom
given the recognition they deserve by the students. It isn't their
fault that the only people who really get excited about collegiate
athletic anymore are check-waving alumni crying win-or-else
ultimatums to the Athletic Department.
Maybe even Ronald Reagan's more palatable than Bureaucracy
on a basketball court.

By MARK HALPERT only seniors on this years squad, will have all the competition he suffered a leg injury , midway
Michigan's sophomore domin- but their loss will definetly hurt. needs from soph senation Gary through the indoor season and
ated track team finished a strong Harvey won bis second consec- Knickerbocker and junior Rick never was at full strength.
third behind Iowa and Michigan utive Big Ten shot-putting title Hunt. Hoey, at full strength, is a much
State in the 1967 Big Ten outdoor with a toss of 58'41/4". He finished Knickerbocker cleared 6'93/4" needed man to supplement an
championship. With help from the in the indoor NCAA Champion- indoors at the Western Michigan otherwise weak sprint field.
strong freshmen squad prospects ships and fifth in the outdoor Relays. He cleared 6'9" in the in- The 300 meter steeplechase was
for a Big Ten title in Ann Arbor competition. door NCAA Championships, to added to the Big Ten Champ-
next year are good. Gerometta was a fine' quarter- finish sixth, and then placed fifth
The highlight of the season miler while Cooper was a good in the Big Ten outdoor meet,
came early in February In New sprinter. Junior Bob Thomas was Michi-
York's Madison Square Garden. The cindermen will get some gan's third Big Ten title winner
Running against Fordham, and much needed help in the long when he captured the discus event ,
Villanova's top ranked two mile jump and the pole vault, with a toss of 178 feet 1 inch. v k
relay units the Michigan quartet Broad Jumper Thomas, along with teammate
composed of sophomores Ron Kut- Ira Russell is a consistent 23 Steve Leuchtman, will try to re-
chinski, Tom Kearney, John Rey- foot broad jumper and could bring place Jack Harvey in the shot put.
nolds and junior Alex MacDonald Michigan fine results in both the While Harvey's shoes will be hard
won the event in 7:29.7, the best long jump and in the triple jump, to fill, these two powerhouses may
time recorded by any college team "Ira may be able to top 24 feet just be able to do it.
during the indoor season. by next season," commented as- Moved Up
In the NCAA finals the quartet sistant coach Dave Martin. Michigan was initially awarded
again beat Fordham and Villanova The pole vault has been the big fourth place in the Big Ten
but was beaten by a lightly re- crowd pleaser since John Uelses Championships until a still photo-
garded U.S.C. unit despite a bril- broke 16' seven four years ago, and graph showed Michigan's Larry
liant anchor leg of 1:49.0 from Michigan's coaches are hoping Midlam to have beaten Iowa's Jon
ailing Ron Kutchinski. Ron Shortt, the frosh sensation, Reimer for fifth place with a ter-
Enters Relays will become Michigan's first 16' rific closing drive in the 120 yard
Coach Don Canham believes vaulter. In the Michigan relays hurdles Michigan moved ahead of
Kutchinski is capable of doing a Shortt did 14'7' to better the Wisconsin into third.
4.02 mile, but prefers entering him freshmen record by two inches. He The fine showing of Midlam,. a
in the relay events. Kutchinski broke his own record by five sophomore, in addition to the con- -
finished third in the 880 yard inches only a week later when he sistent performances turned in by
dash, McDonald, fourth in the vaulted 15' in the Western Michi- junior Nelson Graham could give
660, and Kearney fourth in the gan Relays. the Wolverines some additional "
mile. Together this threesome Clarence Martin did not clear help in both the high and low hur-
along with Reynolds may be un- 6'4" until the outdoor season be- dles.
beatable in their second full year gan, but when he did they just George Hoey, who will be coun-
of varsity competition. could not stop him. He climaxed halfback during the football sea-
Talmo Leps, Ken Coffin, and a great outdoor season by jumping ted on to do well as a defensive
Elmo Morales round out an out- 6' 9" to capture the Big Ten Title son, could rise to the top of the
standing collection of returning as a sophomore. . Big Ten sprinters. As highly tout-
middle distance lettermen. With his vast improvement he ed sophomore, Hoey turned in sev- LARRY MIDLAM
Captain Jack Harvey, Bob Ger- may be able to clear the golden seral 06:2 clockings in the sixty
ometta and Dave Cooper were the seven foot barrier soon. Martin yard dash early in the season, but ionships last year, and should be
a good point getter for the cinder-
7 5 _.men next year.
Steve Bishop, a former high
. ..{. "'. ..... ....., ,,*. :"*..... ..:*. . . . school miler, turned his attention
to the two mile and 3000 meter
tsteeplechase events, and was rap-
idly improving all season. He cap-
.# r ~..;tured third in the steeplechase
fy, while teammated Jamie Dennie
z3 captured fourth.
C Outstanding.
.".iJim Dolan, who captured third
n the three mile race in the Big
.....uTen Championships, rounds out
an outstanding long distance trio.
hStates fine long distance runner,
graduating after capturing second
* {}. - :in both the three mile and 3000
S;>meter steeplechase the Wolverine
;.:?.position will be enhanced.
.:>"<}With two outdoor champions
heading the squad, Michigan's
track team should be in the thick
of both the indoor champion and
,,,:, " . ?f 5 :>' . >-outdoor championships.
.". . '..: . . . . . ... .... _;:,:.?:tr, " " i..
Athletes returning for the 1968
squad scored 36 of the 41 points
amassed in fishing third in the
}; h.1967 outdoor championships. The
addition of several frosh stars will
elevate the track team into ser-
iouscontention is not only Big
THE 1967 TWO-MILE RELAY TEAM poses with track coach Don Canham, right. From left to right Ten competition, but also in na-
are Tom Kearney; John Reynolds, Alex McDon ald, Ron Kutchinski, tional events.

EFOOTBALL TICKETS
This year a student wanting football tickets will be required
to purchase a Student Athletic Coupon. This will provide a
season football ticket. The cost will be $14. These will be sold in
the west end of Waterman Gymnasium during registration and
tickets will be distributed as follows:
1. The seating preferences for students are determined by
the NUMBER OF YEARS IN ATTENDANCE AT THE UNIVER-
SITY. The proper priority groups will be punched at the Gym-
nasium after purchase.
2. DISTRIBUTION:
(a) Tickets will be distributed as follows:
Number of years in attendance Priority
Less than 1N....................No.1
1 or more.....................No. 2
' or more ........................ No. 3
3 or more ........................No. 4
(b) Priority No. 4 tickets begin at the 50-yard line.
Priority No. 3 tickets will begin at the end of
Priority No. 4; etc.
(c) Student football tickets to Athletic Coupon pur-
chasers will be distributed as follows:
ONLY No. 4-Thurs., Aug. 31, 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
ONLY No. 3-Friday, Sept. 1, Same Hours.
ONLY No. 2-Tues., Sept. 5, Same Hours.
ONLY No. 1-Wed., Sept. 6, Same Hours.
Student football ticket distribution will be in the
Sports Building as above and prioriyt will end
each day at 4:30 p.m.
THE FOLLOWING RULES WILL BE STRICTLY ADHERED
TO:
1. Students in all four priorities should pick up their
tickets on the day of their priority distribution. If not, they
will be issued tickets in the area being distributed on the
day of pick-up. After Sept. 7, tickets will be distributed at
the Football Ticket Office, corner of Hoover and South
State, through noon of Sept. 16. No student tickets will be
handed out after this date. Hours will be 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m.
2. A student may present his athletic coupon with ID
card and one other coupon with ID card to receive tickets at
the regular distribution windows. No more than TWO
tickets' may be picked up at the regular distribution win-
dows.
3. Grouping for more than two will be permitted. A
student may bring as many Athletic Cards and ID cards as
he wishes. He should take them to a special Group Window
and the seats will be assigned in the estimated lower end of
their priority area. The priority assigned to a group will
be determined by the lowest priority of the group. All stu-
dents should pick up on their regular day of priority dis-
tribution to obtain proper seating. The Athletic Depart-
ment will not be responsible for lost coupons or tickets.

a;

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Student Headquarters
for
MICHIGAN CAMPUS WEAR
SWEAT SHIRTS
(including special orders for fraternities,
sororities, dorms and clubs)
JACKETS

v A

M
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FOR SMALL FRY-Sweat shirts, Suits', Sweaters

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ALL GOLF and TENNIS SUPPLIES FIELD HOCKEY SHOES

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by

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SHORTS, REVERSIBLE T-SHIRTS, WARM-UP SUITS
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HAND BALL GLOVES, SQUASH RACKETS, TEAM UNIFORMS
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