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September 27, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-27

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2'7, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 27, 1967 TIlE MICItI%~AN 1JAIIAI PAGE

.... ..a ..L

Tentative Accord
Reached in N.Y.
Teachers, Board To Vote on Hike;
Students May Go Back Tomorrow

PUBLISH TESTIMONY:
Wheeler Calls For Air Strikes
On Forbidden Haiphong Port

NEW YORK (IP) - The mas-
sive New York teachers' strike
0 was settled on a tentative basis
for the second time in a week
yesterday and 1.1 million public
school chlidren were alerted for
a return to regular classess pos-
sibly by tomorrow.
"It's a fantastically good .pack-
age," said strike leader Albert
Shanker of an accord involving
an added $135 million in teach-
UAW Asks
AU T
H.Ford To
Attend T1alks
DETROIT (1P)-Walter P. Reu-
ther suggested yesterday that Hen-
ry Ford II should join contract
negotiations between Reuther's
United Auto Workers Union and
Ford's strike-bound automobile-
building empire.
Malcolm L. Denise Ford vice
president for labor relations, said
there was no reason he could see
for Ford joining negotiations and
told newsmen "I'd be very sur-
prised if he did."
The UAW struck Ford in an at-
tempt to win a new contract it
hopes to use for pattern for settle-
ments later at Chrysler and Gen-
eral Motors.
21 Days
The strike began Sept. 7 and
enters its 21st day today.
Reuther and Denise differed on
whether a visit by Ford was sug-
gested in a two-hour bargaining
session yesterday.
Denise told a news conference
that "the invitation was not ex-
tended in the bargaining room,"
but added he understood "one was
extended out here" in an earlier
news conference by Reuther.
No Progress
The strike erupted over econ-
kk omic issues and both Denise and
Reuther agreed no progress was
made on them in yesterday's bar-
gaining. Reuther said he would
be back at the head of the UAW
team tomorrow. He said prior com-
mitments preclude his attendance
today.
While Reuther went to Ford,
UAW and company teams met at
the national bargaining table at
Chrysler yesterday for the first
time since Ford was struck. There
was no report of progress from
that meeting either.
General Motors and the UAW
currently are in the second week
of attempts to speed local-level
bargaining in which at-the-plant
working agreements are written to
supplement the national contract.

ers' wages over a 26-month
period.
The walkout of Shanker's 49,-
000-member United Federation of
Teachers, AFL-CIO, has all but
paralyzed normal operations in
the city's 900 public schools for
12 class days - since the sched-
uled Sept. 11 opening of the new
fall, term.
Once again, Mayor John V.
Lindsay, his patience reportedly
near an end, played a key role
in bringing the UFT and the
Board of Education together. He
had announced a tentative set-
tlement Sept. 20 and the schools
were 'scheduled to reopen Mon-
day.
Agreement Fails
However, the accord fell apart
in a bitter argument over the
reduction of its terms to writing,
leading Lindsay to sharply ac-
cuse the union and the board of
"haggling."
In the face of the mayor's ob-
viously displeasure, negotiators
were summoned to City Hall
Monday evening and held in ses-
sion for eight hours. After a res-
pite, the talks resumed yesterday
morning.
At 3:36 p.m., Lindsay strode
into a packed City Hall chamber
to announce once more a seem-
ing end to the longest, costliest
strike in the history of the na-
tion's largest school system.
Summit to Board
In a joint announcement,
school Supt. Bernard Donovan
and Shanker said the formal
agreement wouldbe submitted as
quickly as possible to the Board
of Education and the union.
The statement added: "It is
hoped that this can be accom-
plished so that the teachers can
return to the - schools as early
as possible tomorrow, following
the ratification meeting."
The tentative agreement on
wages replaced a former teach-
ers' scale of $5,400 to $11,950 a
year, with a new salary range of
$6,750 to $13,750.
Few Classes
At the outset of the strike, as
many as 600,000 pupils reported
for classes that seldom were held.
Most of them were sent back
home. With more than 40,000
teachers away from their class-
rooms, few children received any
formal instruction.
By Monday, attendance had
dropped to about 130,000 stu-
dents - only 12 per cent of the
total enrollment. It reportedly
rose to about 147,000 yesterday.
Shanker and his top UFT aides
ignored a no-strike order from
the State Supreme Court in lead-
ing the teachers out. Later, they
brushed off a subsequent back-
to-work mandate from the court.

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-Associated Press
UNITED AUTO WORKERS PRESIDENT Walter P. Reuther suggested yesterday that Henry Ford II
join personally the contract negotiations between Ford Motor Company and the striking UAW.
Ford's chief-negotiator Malcolm Denise said he "doubted" that Ford would involve himself. The
strike, which began Sept. 7, is now in its 21st day. (See story on page.)
POSSIBLE THREAT:

WASHINGTON (A'-Gen. Earle and then you are going to have
G. Wheeler described the one to go back," he said.
North Vietnamese port raided by Dealing with other aspects,
American warplanes as a "peanuts" Wheeler said the Vietnam war
target and called for action would end in a relatively short
against the now-forbidden harbor time if the Communists could be
of Haiphong. denied support from the Soviet
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint Union, estimated this year at
Chiefs of Staff, reported a dif- about $670 million in military aid.
ference in judgment within the He said the same thing is true,
administration on this and said:
"I am on the side that we could
undertake actions against the port
of Haiphong!' Foding of1(
His suggestions on the nature
of those actions were deleted by T
Pentagon censors. In raurrisa e
Dangers
Wheeler's Aug. 16 testimony be- HARLINGEN, Tex. (IP3-Sand-
[ore the Senate preparedness sub- bagging work crews struggled
committee, made public yesterday, block-by-block against swirling
acknowledged that raids on the Rio Grande floodwaters Tuesday
haarbor could hit Communist bloc in a desperate effort to save the
shipping and pose the danger of center of this south Texas city of
a wider Vietnam war. 41,000 from inundation.
"On two occasions," he noted, National Guard helicopters and
"our air strikes on target areas trucks evacuated a state tuber-
near the harbor areas have ac- culosis hospital as waters advanced
cidentally damaged Soviet ship- inexorably.
ping." City officals said 800 homes
But he said that militarily ac- had been flooded.
tion against Haiphong is one of AR io Grande levee burst on the
the most important steps the U.S. Merican side of the river at Rey-
could take. nosa, putting one-third of the
city under water.
Haiphong Important The surging Rio Grande has
"The other two ports, Cam Pha been swollen greatly beyond capa-
and Hon Gai, are peanuts," city by 20- and 30-inch rains that
Wheeler testified. "They are noth- accompanied Hurricane Beulah's
ng of any great importance. Hai- track inland last week.
phong is the important port." Some 20,000 persons in the
On Sept. 11, nearly a month af- 40,000meqrmileeo Texs
ter Wheeler's Senate appearance, battered by Beulah are still in Red
U.S. navy bombers struck Cam Cross and Salvation Army shelters.
Pha, a port used primarily for the Various Texas rivers are still as
Wheeler testified that one air much as 15 feet above flow stage.
raid is not going to be sufficient The state highway department
to choke off the flow of war sup- said 15 major roads remain block-
plies through Haiphong. ed by high water.
"In order to really destroy the Meanwhile, Sen. Ralph Yarbor-
capability to move stuff through ough (D-Tex. charged yesterday
the port of Haiphong, you would that Gov. John Connally was
have to apply a sizeable effort "playing politics with disaster" by
over a considerable period of time, not having applied by now for
FILM: CONVERSATIONS WITH
PAUL TILLICH
Prof. Tillich discusses the place of religion in the philosophy of life,
morality vs. moralism, the latent vs. the manifest church,
and other topics.
TODAY: 12:30to1 P.M.,
Multipurpose Room, UGLI
(Also will be shown Thurs., Sept. 28, 7:30 P.M., Canterbury House)
Sponsored by: The Office of Religious Affairs, 2282 SAB

to a lesser degree, of Communist
Chinese support, estimated at
about 25 per cent of North Viet-
nam's supplies.
Wheeler reported the Joint
Chiefs of Staff believed that 70
targets which had not been ap-
proved by the administration on
Aug. 16 should be authorized for
strikes.
Mxas Continues
leulab's Wake
federal designation of south Texas
as a major disaster area.
Connally and his aides say they
are waiting until proper paper and
damage assessments can properly
be drawn up.
State and federal officials had
estimated the damage to Texas
from Beulah at $500 million last
week before the torrential rains
hit.
Estimates now exceed $1 billion.
The death toll from the giant
storm, one of the most powerful
hurricanes in history, remained
at 44. Eleven died in Texas, the
rest in Mexico and the Caribbean.

Students, udistsPang
9 T
Protests of VietnmEecin
TO tn I am IlRS
SAIGON (;P)-South Vietnamese tary government in the spring of termeasures the Buddhist drive
government police are steeled for 1966. subsided.
possible student and Buddhist This morning militant Buddhists Since then they have fragment-r
demonstrations reported to be at the An Quang pagoda in Saigon, ed and the power Tri Quang's mil-;
planned for today, tomorrow and headquarters of Thich Venerable itant sect is thought to have di-
Friday. Tri Quang, plan a mass meeting, minished.
If the students and Buddhists possibly followed by a march into Students and Buddhists marched'
take to the streets, they would the street, the informants said. in Saigon, Hue and Da Nang Sun-t
Tri. Quang was the leader of the day to protest that the Sept. 3f
pose the most serious threat to the antigovernment "struggle move- presidential and senate electionse
government since the militant ment" in the spring of last year, were rigged. The Buddhists want
Buddhists tried to topple the mili- but after strong government coun- Chief of State Nguyen Van Thieu,
- __ ___- - the president-elect, to rescind a
new national Buddhist charter he
AgkXT" signed inJuly,
British Seek Parley The charter recognizes as the
official Buddhist Church of South
T f Vietnam, a nonmilitant sect with
Si n swhich the militants are at odds.
H an oi For signing the charter, the mil-
itants called Roman Catholic
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. (P) - Vietnam yesterday rejected as an Thieu a traitor.
British Foreign Secretary George "American-style trick" U.S. Am- The government clamped downj
Brown called yesterday for imme- bassador Arthur Goldberg's plea yesterday on another form of polit-
diate peace talks on Vietnam, but for United Nations members to ical opposition, closing the Saigon
charged that Communist Hanoi help bring about a political solu- newspaper Thoi Dai Epoch for
has "declined to grasp the many tion to the Vietnam war. printing a story that said the Na-
opportunities to negotiate that (The official Hanoi newspaper tional Assembly was going to in-
have been offered." Nhan Dan wrote a scatching com- validate the election of Thieu
In a wide ranging policy speech mentary which was broadcast over and his vice president-elect, Pre-
before the 122-nation General As- Radio Hanoi on Goldberg's speech mier Nguyen Cao Ky, because of
sembly, Brown appealed anew for before the United Nations last irregularities.
a settlement of the war on the week. Three other papers have been
basis of the Geneva conference on (Goldberg asked for assurances closed this month and a total of
Indochina. that there would be negotiations six Saigon newspapers are now
(Meanwhile Communist North if the United States stopped bomb- suspended, leaving 23.
ing North Vietnam.) Saigon students have scheduledI
As co-chairmen of the Geneva a meeting tonight and some leaders
conference, the Soviet Union and talk of a street demonstration
Britain have the authority to bring after the meeting.
d Vietnam before that body. But
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A. On Friday, police sources say,
soGromyko remained adamant 'students and Buddhists are plan- I
A source close to Romney said gainst temiea w Bron ning demonstrations in South
the governor will declareformally sounded him out over the weekend. Vietnam's major cities, among
his candidacy when he returns them Saigon, Da Nang, Can Tho,
from a tour of urban ceners yea abortive" efforts totachieve Nha Trang, Hue and Dalat.
the nation this weekend, possibly a Vietnam settlement had been Friday is the day when the Na-
soon after. overshadowed by death and de- tional Assembly is scheduled to
struction. begin debate on whether or not
BOSTON-A steady stream of "There has been no progress in to validate the Sept. 3 elections.
voters indicated a substantial vote the fighting," Brown said. "There It must consider the 15 official
yesterday in the city's non-par- has been no program toward a complaints filed against the elec-
tisan primary to choose among 10 solution." tions.

8 P.M. FRIDAY, SEPT. 29
TICKETS: i. L HUDSON COMPANY

MEMORIAL BLDG. 342.1029
$4.50, $3.50, $2.50. $1.50

ON YOUR CAMPUS you may
buy tickets at U of M
Box Office

- --- ------ - - --- ----------

"FASCINATING !"
-Det. Free Press
"WICKEDLY POTENT!"
-Flint Journal
"TREMENDOUS SCENES !"
-A.A. News

f'VIRTUOSITY !"

-Det. News

"PROVOCATIVE !"
-Toledo Blade
"SCH IZOPHREN IC"
-Daily

World News Rou

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-Alexander N. Shele-
pin, long regarded as a future top
man in the Soviet Union, lost his
key post as secretary of-the Rus-
sian Communist party Friday.
The demotion by party officials,
who apparently feared the 49-
year-old former secret police chief,
was announced by the party.
The announcement, after a party
Central Committee meeting, said
Shelepin was released because of
his appointment last July to head
the Soviet trade unions. The trade
unions job is traditionally a sec-
ondary one here.
MIAMI, Fla.-Tropical Storm
Edith, fifth of the slow-starting
but busy hurricane season, form-
ed yesterday 675 miles east of the
Leeward Islands which spawned
the killer storm Beulah.
The Weather Bureau said Edith
probably would become a hurri-
cane today.
Tomorrow & Friday
THE BURMESE
HARP
dir. Kon Ichikawa, 1956
Japanese, subtitles
a tale of pacifism in
a WWII prison camp.
Japanese prisoner
must decide-?
Japan or Peace?

CAMIRI, Bolivia-Regis Debray,
27-year-old French chronicler of
Castro-style revolution, went be-
fore a military court yesterday on
charges of aiding Communist guer-
rillas in the Bolivian jungle. The
prosecution asked the maximum
sentence-30 years in prison.
The military prosecutor, Col.
Remberto Iriarte, declared Debray
"entered Bolivia clandestinely and
took up arms."
Iriarte presented as evidence De-
bray's book, "Revolution in the
Revolution" which sets forth the
Cuban revolution as a tactical
example for leftist movements
around the world.
DETROIT-Gov. George Rom-
ney will visit Europe in November
and plans to announce his candi-
dacy for the 1968 Republican pres-
idential nomination before leaving,
reports indicate.
CINEMA II
ROMAN
POLANSKI'S
Presents
Repulsion
(1966)
A provocative attempt
to out-Hitchcock
Hitchcock

aspirants for mayor, including
Louise Day Hicks, outspoken op-
ponent of efforts to achieve racial
balance in public schools.
The two top vote-getters will
run off for the mayoralty in the
Nov. 7 final election.

The gloomy picture he painted
reflected conclusions Brown and
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
reached after private talks Mon-
day that prospects for Vietnam
agreement at this stage were "none
too bright."

TRAVEL-
INTERNATIONAL
COMMITTEE UNION-LEAGUE
Presents
A Holiday in NASSAU
Via United Air Lines
DECEMBER 26th-JANUARY 2nd
DETROIT-NASSAU-DETROIT
MASS MEETING for Those Interested-
Room 3R and 3S Thursday, 7:30 P.M.
Union September 28th
- THIS WEEK AT:
1421 Hill Street

STARTS THURSDAY
"EXTRAVAGANTLY
BOLD and BIZARRE"
-Bosley Crowther, N.Y. Times
"MISS ZETTERLING
MAKES EACH SCENE
A WORK OF ART.
STUNNING EFFECTS.
-WilEiam Wolf, cue Magazine
"THE VOYEUR'S
DELIGHT OF THE YEAR.'
-Jud;#h Cris, World Journal Tribune
StarringINGRID THULIN
ADMITTANCE RESTRICTED TO
PERSONS OF AGE 18 MINIMUM
Mon.-Thurs. 7, 9 P.M.
Fri., Sat. 7, 9 & 11 .M.
Sun. 6, 8 & 1 0 P.M.

in de Ghelderode's

NOW
to
Oct. 1

IT
a

Evenings at
8:00 P.M.
Matinee Sun.
at 2:30 P.M.

SHORT:
.l A C..

Chaipter 2
rune f%^

Returning! PRIOR To EXPO 67
4b at- AEWhA LJ&1f

Coming ! Oct. 10-15
(also Oct. 31-Nov. 5)

l Ii ~.. .

lAev ^111kir -C-11,

I

I

I

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