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September 23, 1967 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-23

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGlE THEE

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1967 'IliE MICHIGAN DAILY PAnE THREE

a rave auava u

a,,

orth
WASHINGTON (A')-Adm. U.S.
Grant Sharp has provided the
first official, undisputed confir-
mation that North Vietnamese
troops attack American forces
from sanctuaries in Cambodia.
In May 1966 the Pentagon pub-
licly contradicted a high Army
officer who made a similar state-
ment.,
The United States had avoided
making an issue with Cambodia
over Communist infiltration of its
borders. Cambodia professes neu-
trality in the Vietnam war.
Senate Testimony
Sharp, commander-in-chief, Pa-
cific, told the Senate preparedness
investigating subcommittee:
"We have known for quite a
long time that there are various
regiments that operate back and
forth in South Vietnam and back
into Cambodia when the heat is
on them. They use Cambodia as
a sanctuary."
Sharp's estimate of how many
North Vietnamese troops are in-
volved was deleted by Pentagon
censors before his testimony, of
Aug. 9-10, was released Wednes-
day.
There was nothing in his re-
marks, however, to indicate he
disagreed with an estimate given
by Army Maj. Gen. Stanley R.
Larson in a Pentagon news con-
ference May 27, 1966.
10,000 Men
Larson, commander of U.S.
forces in central South Vietnam
at the time, said then that an
estimated four to six regiments
involving perhaps 10,000 men were
massed just inside Cambodia's
border with South Vietnam.
The same day Larson offered
his estimate, which he said was
based on prisoner interrogations
and reports from other sources,
the Pentagon issued a statement
knocking it down. The Pentagon
said there was "no evidence strong
enough" to confirm the presence
of any North Vietnamese regiment
in Cambodia.
'Lies'
Cambodia, in turn, described
Larson's comments as "lies."
Under questioning by the Sen-
ate subcommittee, Adm. Sharp
said "the evidence continues that
these outfits are there. We carry
it as deleted and they go back and
forth, a regiment at a time . . ."
The Pentagon, asked about the
C a m b o d i a situation yesterday
would say only that "North Viet-
namese troops are believed to
cross the ill-defined border be-
tween South Vietnam and Cam-
bodia fairly frequently."
It is understood the U.S. govern-
ment does not wish to publicly
accuse Prince Norodom Sihanouk,
Cambodia's chief of state, of in-
ability or unwillingness to patrol
his country's boundaries against
Communist infiltration.

Vietnamese

Army
Base

E"
I'
I

Teachers To OAS CONFERENCE CONVENES:
Delay Strike Bolivia Charges 'Cue' Guevara
End in N.Y. Joins Insurrectionists in Jungle

Cambodia

As

*

*

*

*

*

*

Gromyko Warns of Whar Spread'

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. ()-
Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei A.
Gromyko denounced as a "soap1
bubble" yesterday U.S. efforts tol
make peace in Vietnam and warn-1
ed that the fighting could "over-'
run new areas and draw newi
states into its orbit."
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.
Goldberg, in an immediate reply
to Gromyko's major address in the
U.N. General Assembly, called on:
the Soviet Union to "put my gov-4
ernment's profession to the test"
and begin a dialogue leading to ai
political solution.1
He decried what he said were+
Gromyko's "ritualistic name call-
ing" and "very stale and totallyi
false charges."
National Ne,
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO - Danny Escobedo,
freed in 1964 of a murder convic-
tion by a landmark U.S. Supreme+
Court decision, was held under
$100,000 bond Friday after he and
three other men were seized by
federal agents as members of a+
narcotics ring.
Escobedo, 29, was charged spe-
cifically with the sale of 11.32
grams of heroin to a federal nar-
cotics agent on Aug. 3.
WASHINGTON - The nations
first system designed to intercept
missile-carried nuclear bombs will
consists of 15 to 20 antimissile
complexes throughout the United
States.
Announcing a few details about
the antiballistic missile ABM de-
fense, the Pentagon said Friday
each antimissile missile will cost
roughly $1 million. The number of
missiles planned for the system
was not announced.
CHICAGO - James R. Hoffa,
Teamster Union president, was
sentenced yesterday for the sec-
ond time to five years in prison
and fined $10,000 on a 1964 con-
viction of fraud and conspiracy
involving the multimillion-dollar
union pension fund.
The sentencing judge said the
five-year term is to run consecu-
tively with the eight-year term
which Hoffa presently is serving
in the federal prison in Lewisburg,
Pa., for jury tampering in Chat-
tanooga, Tenn.
* * *
WASHINGTON-A U.S. spokes-
man said Friday that "unneces-
sarily severe police measures" ap-

Gromyko accused the United
States of "trying to delude people
by making all kinds of tranquil-
lizing statements." Each new U.S.
peace initiative, he contended,
"turns out to be a soap bubble
intended either for domestic or
external consumption."
Goldberg's speech to the As-
sembly Thursday, which U.S.
sources designed to be con-
ciliatory, contained nothing new,
Gromyko said.
"Those whose armed forces have
invaded Vietnam have no inten-
tion of getting out," he said, and
even a halt in the bombing of
North Vietnam is "contingent upon
ultimative demands."
He said that "peace may be

brought about in Vietnam solely
as a result of the withdrawal of
the aggressors."
In his reply, Goldberg told the
assembly that the main purpose
in his speech Thursday was "to
open the way for a dialogue lead-
ing toward peace."
The United States, he said,
hoped to encourage all parties to
the conflict in Vietnam to assume
their responsibilities, and "we
made clear that the United States
would not shirk its own responsi-
bilities."
Goldberg noted that, with Brit-
ain, the Soviet Union is co-chair-
man of the Geneva Conference on
Indochina and that it can be
convened only with Soviet con-

sent. He added that Britain has
long been willing to reconvene and
Roundup conference.
"Our government's motives have
been impugned by Mr. Gromyko,"
parently were used by Vietnam Goldberg said, "and I should like
partiyereagause Viento say that there is an excellent
authorities against a prominent way to put my government's pro-
political figure in Saigon Thurs- fessions to the test.
day.
The comment amounted to a "Begin the dialogue which we
restrained rebuke for South Viet- propose leading to a political solu-
namese authorities in the handling tion and reconvene the Geneva
of the case of former Finance Conference." Gromyko made no
Minister Au Truong Thanh. direct reference to Goldberg's ap-
* * * peal Thursday for authoritative
WASHINGTON - President word from Hanoi that "meaning-
Johnson, taking note anew of ful negotiations" would take place
critics of the Vietnam war, said if the U.S. bombing of the North
t 4-~t1rdA the hi tmi wetir o ipe.

NEW YORK ()-A threat to
extend the two-week teachers' WASHINGTON OP)-The hemi-
strike into the middle of next sphere foreign ministers meetingI
week came late yesterday when opened yesterday with charges ofi
union president Albert Shanker Castro aggression and surprise1
said teachers would not be able j evidence that Cuba's arch-revo-f
to vote Sunday on a new contract' lutionary, Ernesto "Che" Guevara,t
proposal, has joined guerrillas in the jun-1
The reason, Shanker said, was gles of Bolivia.
that the Board of Education had The three-day OAS conference#
refused to pay printers to stand was called by guerrilla-plagued
by over the weekend and provide Venezuela following continued Ha-
the printed contracts necessary vana-supported terrorism in that
for the vote, country. Venezuela has a U.S.-
The board, however, then re- backed nine-point proposal aimedI
versed itself and said it would Iat tightening the GAS contain-1
hold printers to rush the proposal ment programs against Castro.
into print in time for a vote Sun-
day. 'Interventionist Acts'
Rally Sunday "Interventionist and aggressivet
Shanker, head of the AFL-CIO acts are carried out against my i
United Federation of Teachers, country by the present Communist
had said the union would rally as regime," declared Venezuelan For-
scheduled at 5 p.m. Sunday but eign Minister Ignacio Iribarren
"the question of ratification will Borges.
not be taken up at that time." He favored condemning Ha-
Shanker and the board sparred vana's export of insurrection and
all day over efforts to put at beefing up programs for curbingr
$3135.4 million verbal agreement free world trade with Cuba andf
on paper, for inter-American cooperation in
The verbal agreement reached anti-subversion policing. But none
Wednesday between the board and of the foreign ministers speaking
the United Federation of Teach- during the day favored any use of
ers, AFL-CIO, after day and night military force against Castro.
bargaining had been expected, B
subject to ratification by the' Bolivia's foreign minister, Wal-
teachers, to end the strike. ter Guevara Arze, brought photo-
graphic and other evidence which
Accusations he said proves "Che" Guevara
Yesterday, however, each side joined insurrectionists in moun-
was accusing the other of trying tainous Bolivia.
to change the agreed terms. 'He Is Alive'
Shanker c h a r g e d during a W hn hth saiei
luncheon recess of his trial on "We think that he is alive In
contempt charges, that the board Bolivia now," the foreign minister
was "slicing away" at parts of the said,
verbal pact. The photos and other docu-
Schools Supt. Bernard E. Dono- ments were captured during the
van replied that the union leaders Bolivian a r m e d forces drive
were "debating every comma and against what the foreign minister
insisting on their own versions estimated is a band now number-
which are contrary to the agree- ing around 100 to 150 insurrec-
ment." - tionists.
HAWIIAN LUAUv
Food and Entertainment
of the Islands
SUNDAY, Sept. 24
6:30 P.M.-Only $1.25
NEWMAN-331 Thompson
6

The Argentine-born "Che" Gue-
vara, a leading apostle of militant
revolutions in Latin America, was
last seen in Cuba as a top Castro
aide about 2/2 years ago. Since
then there have been reports of
his appearance in several other
countries and also speculation
that he was dead.
The Bolivian foreign minister
said his government will handle
its guerrilla problem and does not
want OAS military intervention,
but it does favor Venezuela's pro-
posals.
Johnson
President Johnson, addressing
the 21-nation gathering of Organ-
ization of American States min-
isters, compared the "virulent
form of subversion directed from
Havana" with North Vietnam's
drive against South Vietnam.
Governments "must meet ter-
rorism and sabotage with resolute
force where necessary," Johnson

""

SECOND FILM IN THE
INGMAR BERGMAN SERIES
"Smiles of a Summer Night"
Saturday, Sept. 23-8:00 P.M.-50c
NEWMAN CENTER-331 Thompson

told the Latin American leaders
at a White House luncheon. "Mu-
tual support by neighboring coun-
tries strengthens their ability to
deal with indirect aggression."
The President said, however,
that the best long-term guarantee
against subversive threat from
Premier Fidel Castro's Communist
regime lies in the Alliance for
Progress program of hemisphere
economic and social development.
With that, Johnson signed a
Congress-passed authorization for
$900 million more for the Inter-
American Bank for the next three
years, a $150-million-a-year in-
crease.
Equador's Julio Plado Vallejo
complained of trade disadvant.
ages which he said the less-de-
veloped countries face. He called
for better trade and aid terms as
the best way to wipe out poverty-
stricken breeding grounds for Cas-
tro communism.

yeserd a e pg question is
whether the war is worth the
price. "I say it is," he declared.
Johnson's remarks were pre-
pared for an audience of the
heads of some 300 national fra-
ternal organizations.

The Soviet official also did not
reply to Goldberg's question as to
what Hanoi's allies would do to
promote a peaceful solution in
Vietnam if the bombings were
stopped.

U-Aw~f

/1/el

Supper Discussion
The Christian Role in Conflict
Speaker: Paul Dotson
Director Ecumenical Campus Center
Sunday, Sept. 24.0. 6 P.M.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
1 432 Washtenaw
? BUARDIREYROUS B
VANGUARD RECORD'S

Graduate Mixer
SUNDAY, SEPT. 24
8 P.M.

1429 Hill St.
REFRESHMENTS

663-4129
DANCING

i
,
.
Ar'

MEMBERS FREE
NON-MEMBERS 50c
You must be 21

UNION-LEAGUE

CONTROVERSY

67

presents

TONIGHT at
t HP ARK
1421 Hill Street
8:30 P.M.
WILL GEER & BOB WHITE
doing
"BOUND FOR GLORY"{
aI
WOODY GUTHRIE FOLK-IN
presents
DIRECT FROM VIENNA! EARANsAND WIEN
PRESENT FRANZ LEHAR's
WORLD FAMOUS OPERETTA
THE a::q(
IN THE ORIGINAL VIENNESE PRODUCTION STARRING
GIUSEPPE DISTEFANObTh y
with DAGMAR KILLER# Valorie Goodall " Kart Weber " Theo Bayle .

JUDY RODERICK
Singing, Playing the BLUES
This FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY,
Sept. 22, 23, 24 at 8 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

12ns
.'to
4-r

MARK LANE
Sept. 27-8 P.M.

BARRY
GOLDWATER
Oct. 8-3 P.M.

BISHOP
JAMES PIKE

F. LEE BAILEY

Oct. 29-3

$1.50 with goodies gratio

330 MAYNARD

Tickets: Series
Student-$3.00
Nan-Student-$5.00
Single Admission:
Student-$1 .00
Nan-Student-$1 .50

Oct. 11-8 P.M.
Ticket Sales:
Diag-1 0 A.M.-3 P.M.
Hill Aud.--10 AAMA- P.M.

P.M.
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9.
K,

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MRryr. <?.ow 5:£ .t ,+:";i:+';;
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North Campus Commons-11:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M.
Law Club-11:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M.

INVITATIONS TO RECEPTIONS AVAILABLE AT UAC OFFICES

L

UNION-LEAGUE

0
Z

te 4awe &umeck
(quarte t
Wednesday, Sept. 27
R P.M 450 400 350

ATTENTION FRESHMEN*
STUDENT SESQUICENTENNIAL ESCORT SERVICE
MASS MEETING
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25
7:30 P.M.-UNION BALLROOM

f_,

11

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