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September 20, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SILL

THE MICHIGAN DAIL'Y'

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

- I I IE-CHG N ALYWDNSAY EIEBE

Duke
By ROB SALTZSTEIN
"The name Blue Devil," says the
Duke University press guide for
1967, "was derived from the
French Blue Devils, a crack Alpine
corps whi6h wore a striking blue
uniform with a blue beret."
As Tobacco Road sunshine in-
vades Michigan Stadium this Sat-
urday, the Blue Devil football
team will certainly be decked out
in royal blue. But you can forget
about the beret. When Wolverine
tacklers take a shot, at bringing'
down Duke's All-America fullback
candidate, Jay Calabrese, the crack
of helmets shouldi be heard even
in the freshman seating section.
Calabrese runs hard, very hard.
In high school at St. John's of
Washington, D.C., he ran hard
enough to be voted the city's out-
standing football player. As a

Fields
sophomore at Duke two years ago
the hard charging youth barely
missed being the Atlantic Coast
Conference's rushing champ.
This year he should run right
into and through Duke's all time
leading ground gaining record. As
a high school teammate once said
of him back in Washington, "He's
big (215 pounds), he's strong, and
he runs like the wind." Michigan'
coach Don James adds that, "Cala-
brese could play with any college,
team in the country."
But Calabrese isn't the only king
size filter in the Duke package this
year. Duke comes into Ann Arbor
Saturday with that most precious
of all commodities, a carton of
experience. It includes an all senior
backfield that smokes on the pin-
point passing of quarterbacks Al
Woodall and Larry Davis plus the

Seasoned Si
running of speedster Frank Ryan. year and against the Deacons, he
(No relation to Dr. Ryan of the made some spectacular receptions,
Browns.) one good for forty yeards.

quad

BACKFIELD PUZZLE:
'M'Plays 'Na me Game

9

Woodall hit on eight of eleven
passes last week in a Blue Devil
rout of- Wake Forest, 31-13.
Against the Wolverines he will
take dead aim on exploiting a
Michigan defensive secondary in
which three of the four starters
have yet to accumulate game ex-
perience.
Davis alternates with Woodall
as the Blue Devil running quarter-'
back and like UCLA's Gary Beban,
his specialty is the end-option
sweep. Both quarterbacks will play
against the Wolverines but if Duke
falls behind early, look ' for 6' 5"
Woodall to open up the Blue Devil
attack.'
Ryan racked up a 4;4 average
from the running back slot last

- - - I

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Greene's use carefully-contrlled formulas for soil removal, give your
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Duke's defense is stacked again
also, with eight of eleven starters
returning from last year's 5-5
squad. But sophomore linebacker
Dick Biddle made the loudest Blue
Devil purge last week, three time
putting out Wake Forest fires with
two pass interceptions and a fum-
ble recovery. In the words of Duke
coach Tom Harp, "On the field
Biddle is a mean as heck."
As any tobacco baron from
North Carolina will tell you, the
Blue Devil defensive line is not
exactly hurting either. Veterans
Bob Foyle, Robbin Bodkin and
Bob Lasky return to their posts
and for the enemy that can only
mean trouble. Last week this care-
fully pruned' and well nurtured
threesome held the opposition to
69 yards, good by any standard.
Oh Golly
Perhaps a Duke freshman player
described the Blue Devid line most
accurately. Said the awed fresh-
mar., "Foyle will come after you.
Run into Bodkin and you've had it
-I mean the hospital. Gee, he's
strong and LaskCy is no weakling
either."
"But the real blight spot on our
team," said Coach Harp, "is our
defensive secondary. We have more
speed back there, more range, and
our personnel has a great deal of
game experience from last year."
This could be the most crucial
factor in Saturday's game for the
Wolverines' Dick Vidmer, one of
the nation's best sharp shooters,
the Duke secondary will be well
tested.
One thing is sure about Satur-
day's game. The Blue Devils would
like nothing better than to stir
things up in Ann Arbor and go
back to Durham with a 2-0 record'
But Michigan is not Wake Forest
and the facts of life in the Big Ten
will make the Blue Devil goal a
difficult one to obtain. Contrary to
Wake Forest, Michigan will be
dealing in hard packs only.

ROBIN BODKIN

TOP TOLEDO, 2-.

By JOEL BLOCK
"People."
To Barbara Streisand, the word
means a millon-dollar song. To
Coach Hank Fonde, it means a.
way of coaching.
"We haven't changed our of-f
fensive plays since Bob Timber-
lake played for us in '64," states
Fonde, offensive backfield coach'
for the Wolverines.
"Only the people who run them!
have changed."
And this year the changes have
been cataclysmic.
Only one man, seniot quarter-
back Divk Vidmer, returns from
last year's starting backfield. The
others {- converted end Warren
Sipp, Ron Johnson, and Ernie
Sharpe - have all had a taste of
varsity competition as subs for
injured starters.

This year, says Fonde, the plays
will be the same, but they'll be
molded to fit the personnel.
Vidmer will run the same opt-
ion pitch-out play that Timber-
lake ran three years ago. But
more-often-than-not he'll either
pitch out to a running back or
stop and throw a pass instead of
running the ball himself.
Last year, Vidmer concentrated
on one receiver, All-American end
Jack Clancy. This year, Fonde
has other ideas for his senior
signal-caller.
"We've worked hard on trying
to present a balanced attack using
both ends and both halfbacks as
frequent passing targets."
The running game will also ad-
just to fit the new backfield Vid-
mer won't be able to utilize the
thes breakway speed of a Carl

Kickers Open Rough Season

By PHIL BROWN
Michigan won a big game last
Saturday, but it won't put the
Wolverines in any national rat-
ings or get them written up in
Sports Illustrated.
The victory-a 2-1 overtime tri-
umph at the expense of Toledo-
marked the beginning of the fall
season for the Michigan soccer
club. It was especially important
because Michigan had never be-
fore beaten Toledo away from
home, and further because the
kickers are a young team and had
very little practice going into the
contest.
The soccer club rolled up a 3-2-3
record last year, losing twice to
Buffalo. Buffalo is consistently one
of the nation's soccer powerhous-
es. The Bisons, as a tribute to
the quality of Michigan soccer,
voted the Wolverines their "Best

Opponent" award and invited
them back for this year's Home-
coming game.
Buffalo has two All-Americans,
as well as a goalie that was scored
upon only twice in two years be-
fore meeting. Michigan last sea-
son (the Wolrerines tallied five
times in two games). The October
21 contest will be one of the sea-
son's best.
Michigan's wins were all big
ones-a 4-0 rout of Toledo, a 7-0
whipping of Eastern Michigan and
an 8-2 runaway over the Detroit
Ukranian Club. All of these teams
return on Michigan's 1967 sched-,
ule.
Michigan features some out-
standing individual performers,
and the Toledo win indicates that
they will combine to anchor a
strong tean.
Despite the "club" status of soc-

GRID SELECTIONS I
Here's 9 typical East Quaddie trying desperately to get his Grid
Picks entry blank in before the deadline Friday night. See him
"jockey" for position and shout himself "hoarse" in an attempt to win
two free pizzas from Cottage Inn and two free passes to the Michigan

Ward or the bulldozing techniques
of a Dave Fisher but he may have
a new type of runner behind him
this year.
Fonde refers to halfback John-
son as a "slasher." He knows he
doesn't try to. But he has the
ability to follow his blockers well
and run to daylight when he
sees the hole.",
The story behind Warren Sipp
is one of a good player trying to
find a place to play.
Fonde tells it this way. "Sipp
was an excellent fullback at Ak-
ron's North High School. When he
came to Michigan we knew he was
good enough to play for us, but
Dave Fisher had the fullbcak
position sown up.
Tight Switch
"So we decided to move him
to tight end where he'd have a
better chance to play. /It turned
out to be a smart move when
Clayt Wilhite got injured early
last season and Sipp filled in
capably for him.
"Now with Fisher gone, he's
moved back to his home position
where we think he'll do the job
for us."
Behind the starting four are
more new faces and more inex-
perience. But this doesn't seem
to worry Fonde.
"All three of the sophomore
second team runnng backs are
in the 6-2, 215 pound range.
They're big, strong runners with
good skills in blocking apd pass
catching also."
Reynolds Gone
John Gabler and Garvie Craw
go at the halfback slots and
Frank Titus is the second string
fullback. Titus replaces junior
letterman John Reynolds who, in

Series

Tickets

I

cer at Michigan, graduates are not
allowed to participate in games
with other schools. They work out
in the regular practice sessions,
however,' and make up almost half
of the total roster.,
The team practices on Wednes-
day, Thursday and Sunday from
5-8 p.m. All practices, like the
home games, are at Wines Field.
Those interested should go to the
practices; dues of $5 are charged
for membership.
The fact that soccer has not
become a varsity sport has hind-
ered its growth at Michigan. Team
members must provide their own
transportation to all out of town
games,"as well as a good part of
the expenses involved in playing a
regular schedule.
A small allotment through the
Men's Intramural program pays
for uniforms and a small part of
the equipment needed for inter-
collegiate soccer.
Poor Conditions
A further drawback has been
the lack of adequate practice and
game facilities. Wine Field, used
by the marching band for three
hours each day, is packed much
too hard to be a good' playing
field.
The athletic administration has
so far refused to permit the use
of either the stadium or Ferry
Field, although the soccer team is
still 'hopeful that one will eventu-
ally be made available.
The lack of varsity status also
makes it difficult for the kickers
to schedule games with some of
the other top teams in the area.
Only the Best
Good teams are always tough to
schedule, but co-captains Bruce
Gerding and Dave Nosha insist
on playing the bests teams avail-
able. They are presently trying to
set up games with Wayne State
and Northern Illinois Universities.
Following a summer of televised
professional soccer, interest is def-
initely climbing in amateur ac-
tion. The game is fast and very
exciting, although many claim that
there is not enough scoring.
Soccer gets its popularity from
the deft footwork and stamina de-
manded of a top performer, and it
is this that makes it a sport for
many who are too small for foot-
ball.

I

4

I

By The Associated Press
The Detroit Tigers announced
yesterday that they will begin ac-
cepting mail orders for 1967 World
Series tickets on Saturday, Sept.
23.
Tickets will be sold in sets, cov-
ering four games, with a limit of
two sets to a customer.
Prices will range from $24 per
seat for reserved pavilion seats,
upper and lower centerfield, to $48
per seat for boxes.

east side
3033 Packard
NO 3-1336

west side campus
1940 W. Stadium 1213 S. University
NO 2-2543 NO 3-3016

main plant
516 E. Liberty
NO 2-3231

Ypsilanti
40 E. Michigan
HU 2-5371

RON JOHNSON

44i}'

. _ m. _ ....

I

Theatre. You too can be "in the running" by just circling the win-
ning teams and sending this slip to 420 Maynard or picking up an
entry blank at the Daily stables. Then, keep "track" of the spore.
pages to see if you're in the "winner's circle."
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

Depends on the giant. Actually, some giants are just regular
kinds of guys. Except bigger.
And that can be an advantage.
How? Well, for one thing, you've got more going for
you. Take Ford Motor Company. A giant in an exciting
and vital business. Thinking giant thoughts. About develop-
ing Mustang. Cougar. A city car for the future.
Come to work for this giant and you'll begin to think
like one.
Because you're dealing with bigger problems, the
consequences, of course, will be greater. Your responsibilities
heavier. That means your experience must be better-more
complete. And so, you'll get the kind of opportunities only a
giant can give.
Giants just naturally seem to attract top professionals.
Men that you'll be working with and for. And some of that
talent is bound to rub off.
Because there's more to do, you'll learn more. In
more areas.

You'll develop a talent for making hard-nosed, imagina'
tive decisions. And you'll know how these decisions affect
the guts of the operation. At the grass roots. Because you'll
have been there.
If you'd like to be a giant yourself, and your better
ideas are in finance, product engineering, manufacturing,
marketing and sales, personnel administration or systems
research, see the man from Ford when he visits your campus.
Or send your resume to Ford Motor Company, College
Recruiting Department.
You and Ford can grow bigger together.;

Fonde's words, "tripped over a
few books this summer" and
won't be elgible to play.
Back-up quarterback is junior
Denny Brown who is serving his
second year in that capacity.
"Brown has improved tremen-
dously over the summer and
should be a threat on the ground
when he's' in there." say Fonde.
Fonde's statement that "the
plays are the same and only the
names have been changed" may
sound like a Dragnet epilogue,
but that's the way Michigan will
play its games this year.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DAVE WEIR

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Duke at MICHIGAN (Score)
Notre Dame at California
Penn State at Navy
Houston at Michigan State
Kentucky at Indiana
Utah at Minnesota
TCU at Iowa
Wisconsin at Washington
Northwestern at Miami (Fla)
Purdue at Texas A & M

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Illinois at Florida
Florida State at Alabama
Syracuse at Baylor,
N. Mexico at Brigham Young
Dayton at Cincinnati
Mississippi St. at Georgia
Temple at Kings Point
SMU at Missouri
Texas at Southern California
St. Lawrence at Bates

li,= - - - III

0

THE AMERICAN ROAD, DEARBORN, MICHIGAN'
AN EQUAL OFFOBTUNIY EMPLOYER.

union-league

presents

Con tro versy

What's it like
to work
for agiant

67

BARRY GOLDWATER
Oct. 8-3 P.M.
"The Immediate
Concern"

TICKET SALES:

Diag-1U0

A.M.-3 P.M.

Hill Aud.-10 A.M.-3 P.M.
North Campus Commons

i

MARK LANE
Sept. 27-8 P.M.
"Rush to Judgment"
TICKETS: Series

t

F. LEE BAILEY
Oct. 29-3 P.M.
"The Defense
Never Rests"

/

Student $3.00
Non-StudJent $5.00

UII RT iA 1WAMV IKE'Iu1 ~

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