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September 20, 1967 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-20

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER; 20,1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 1967 FilE MICHIGAN DAiLY

i A WIW 11 r4"4

Pessimism Marks
First UN Session
Thant, Outgoing President Deplore
Worldwide 'Psychology of Force'

SLIP OR ASSET?
iRockefeller, Griffin Defend
s~ Romney's 'Brainwash' Charge
- h

New York Governor Nelson
Rockfeller and Sen. Robert Grif-
fin (R-Mich). have both come to

UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. WP) -
The 22nd session of the UN Gen-
eral Assembly convened yesterday
with gloomy assessments from the
secretary-general and its outgoing
president that a "psychology of
force" increasingly grips the
world.
The tense Middle East and the
war in Vietnam stood out as the
crucial issues of. the three-month
session, although the Vietnam sit-
uation does .not appear formally
on the agenda.
,The opening of the session was
marked by a sharp but brief dis-
pute over Cuban charges_ that
United States immigration au-
thorities had detained the Cuban
UN ambassador and nine other
members of the Cuban delegation
in Nassu Bahamas.
The seven members of the Cu-
ban delegation here for the open-
Appeal For
U.S-Soviet
Arms Curb
WASHINGTON, {,4) - A State
Department spokesman issued a
new appeal yesterday for United
States-Soviet talks on curtailing
the nuclear missile arms race. He
suggested the new United States
decision to build a limited missile
defense system might "stimulate
the Russians" to hold talks.
The spokesman also said that
United States government experts
believe Communist China "could
have an initial Intercontinental
Ballistic Missile operational capa-
bility as early as the early 1970s."
But he said the initial Chinese
system "will be crude and highly
vulnerable", and will not be able
to penetrate even the limited de-
:fense system the United States is
contemplating.'
The spokesman was press bffi-
cer Robert J. McCloskey.
He was questioned at length at
a news conference about an ap-
parent shift in Johnson adminis-
tration policy on defensive missile
deployment, but declined to be
drawn into discussion and said
there were some questions he
could not answer.
For the past year Secretary of
Defense Robert S. McNamara and
Secretary of State Dean Rusk
have called for a United States-
Russian agreement to avoid a race
in the deployment of antiballistic
missile systems..
But McNamara's announcement
Monday. that the United States
will build a $5 billion missile de-
fense system based the decision to
do so mainly on the need for de-
fense against the possibility of an
"insane and suicidal" attack by
Red China in the 1970s.
Up to last night officials had
appeared to believe that the pros-
pective decision would be based on
United States-Soviet failure even
to get talks started on the issue.
Yesterday McCloskey reverted
to the Soviet theme, saying that
the, administration thought the
United States - Soviet talks were
still highly desirable.
"We're hopeful the new empha-
sis on the ABM problem will stim-
ulates the Russians," he said.

ing walked out of the session after#
protesting that customs personnel
,had tried to search their luggage
in violation of diplomatic im-
munity.
The matter was referred to Sec-
retary-General U Thant for in-
vestigation, and United States
Ambassador Arthur J. Goldberg
said the United States would
abide by his findings.
The assembly elected Corneliu
Manescu, Rpmania's foreign min-
ister, its new president. He is the
first Communist to hold the of-
fice.
In' the introduction to his an-
nual report, Thant expressed fears
of a new Middle East war unless
progress is made toward eliminat-
ing the conditions which led to
the June conflict between Israel
and the Arabs.
The assembly president, Abdul
Rahman Pazhwak of Afghanis-
tan, deplored what he called the
rising trend toward external in-
tervention and warned that guer-
rilla - movements were already
forming in many parts of the
world which "might well become
the Vietnams of tomorrow."
"We can only ponder," he said,
"how a world so badlyshaken by
one Vietnam could bear the shock
of a number of conflicts."d r
Pazhwak attributed the deterio-
rating world situation to a behind
the scenes power struggle which
is turning more and more to the
use of force and is employing both
resistance movements and mer-
cenary forces to promote 'purely
selfish, national interests."
Thant suggested that he be
authorized to name a special rep-
resentative to the Middle East "as
a much needed channel of com-
munications,. as a reporter and
interpreter of events and views
for the secretary-general and as
both a sifter and harmonizer of
ideas in the area."
"I am bound to express fear,"
he said, "that, if again no effort
is exerted and no progress is
made toward removing the root
causes of conflict, within a few
years at the most there will be
ineluctably a new eruption of
war."

the defense of Governor George
Romney's use of the term "brain-
washing" concerning treatment he
had received on a trip to Vietnam.
Griffin said Monday at a news
conferecne in Lansing that Rom-
ney made a "slip," but that "the
slip may -prove to be one of his

I
r
.
i1
j

-Associated Press
THE CUBAN DELEGATION walked out of the UN General Assembly's opening session yesterday in
protest of an incident at U.S. customs. The Cubans claimed that U.S. customs and immigration of-
ficials in Nassau had violated their diplomatic immunity by trying to search their luggage. U.S.
Ambassador Arthur Goldberg said the United States had "fully complied" with the U.S.-UN customs
agreement.
NIKE-X:.
Pentagon Claims Superiority
OfNewAntiMislstem

1
7
I

greatest assets."
"In the long run what counts
is that Gov. Romnsy was saying
what was on his mind," Griffin
said. "He was being honest and in
the long run he'll come out on
top."
'Slips and Goofs'
"Another fellow named Eisen-
hower wasn't a polished politi-
cian," Griffin added. "He made a
few slips and goofs."
Rockefeller spoke yesterday at
a news conference held in the
wake of a Harris poll that listed
him as the leading potential for
the Republican presidential nom-
ination while Romney had dropped
to fourthdplace.
He said Romney, in using the
word "brainwashing," had been
trying to dramatize his view that
President Johnson's administration
was presenting a one-sided pictureI
of the Vietnam problem.
Romney, Rockefeller said, "has,
brought into sharp focus a very,
real issue, which is the public's
right to know."
'Best He Can.'
Asked to assess Johnson's con-
duct of the war, Rockefeller re-
plied in the vein he has used be-,
fore: "I think he's doing the best
he can."
Griffin was asked to comment
on rumors that Romney may de-
clare his candidacy within the next
few weeks. The senator said he.
thought this would be a "good
idea", adding that '"I hope he
does."
"I personaly think Gov. Romney
should become a candidate," he
said. "I believe he's carried on the
-ourtship loing enough to decide
whether he should become a can-
didate."
Romney ,when asked if he will
seek. the nomination, has frequent-
ly replied that he is carrying on a
"courtship" with the idea.

BROWNSVIILE, Tex. 0P)-Hur-
rican Beulah's front-running gales
and torrential rains slammed into
the Texas coast yesterday as
thousands of Texans streamed
inland to escape her full fury.
The storm's main, 135-mile-an-
hour blow was expected to hit
the coastline by midnight near
Brownsville, scene of two deadly
hurricanes in the past century.
Beulah took a slight curve to
the west yesterday-afternoon and
then resumed her slow north-
westerly march toward the .mouth
of the Rio Grande, the border
between the United States and
IMexico.
At 2 p.m. CDT the storm lay
almost stationary 170 miles south-
east of Brownsville. The Weather
Bureau said her track-dictated
by upper wind currents-probably
would hew to the Texas coastline
after the initial landfall near
Brownsville.
Beulah had already killed 24
persons. The storm took 23 lives
while careening through the Ca-
ribbean and across Mexico's Yu-
catan Peninsula in an 11-day
sweep in from the Atlantic. A 15-
year-old girl was swept from her
surfboard at Freeport, just south
of Houston, by a wave rolling up
the Gulf of Mexico from the
storm.

age was reported heavy on the
Yucatan Peninsula. Luis Torres
Mesias, governor of Yucatan, said
at least 30,000 persons were af-
fected by the storm. It wrecked
fishing boats, unroofed homes,
and destroyed crops of .peanuts
and sisal, a fiber used to make
cord and twine.
Heavy damage also was'report-
ed to the resort island of Cozu-
mel, with 34 of 72 rooms destroyed
in one beach-front hotel, and
other coastal areas.
President Gustavo Diaz, Ordaz
established an "air bridge" of
military craft and men to supply
the stricken area.
Brownsville is a city of more
than 50,000, and Matamoros,
Mexico, has an equal population.
The rich citrus-growing Lower
Rio Grande Valley also lay in the
path of the storm.
CINEMAJI

Griffin said he' thought a decla- country's urban problems.
ration by Romney would "crystal- Democrats have criticized the
lize his candidacy" and would trip, saying Romney should be at
bring support from many person' home to deal with teachers' con-
Who have been hesitant about tract disputes. which have delayed
making a commitment, waiting to some school openings, and the
see which way Romney will move. United Auto Workers strike against
Many Senate Republicans are Ford Motor Co.
holding back in expressing support: "I believe Gov. Romney is per-
for any candidate, Griffin said. forming an ipportant function by
Griffin defended Romney's cur- getting a look at how other states
are handling the problems," he
rent 20-day cross-country touradhading the rlms, ld
said, adding that the trip could
which the governor has said is de- have a bearing on what can be
signed to give him a look at the' done in Michigan.
Hurricane Beulah Lashes
Texas with Gale.WindsRain

WASHINGTON (P) - Pentagon
cientists regard the planned
United -States Nike-X defense sys-
tem as far superior to the Soviet
antiballistic missile system de-
loyed around Moscow.
At this point scientists say they
detect nothing in the Russian sys-
;em which might match this coun-
;ry's short-range, superfast Sprint
missile designed for close-in in-
;ercepts of nuclear warheads.
Nor do the Soviets appear to
have come up with the electronic-
ally switched radars which give
the Nike-X long-range eyes and
split-second scanning capabilities.
In general, intelligence assess-
mnents are that Russia's ABM is at

best comparable to the old Nike- The Russian system apparently
Zeus antimissile system. Secretary .ncludes missile interceptors known
)f Defense Robert S. McNamara as Griffon and Galosh.
refused to deploy it the past five In addition to what officials re-
years on grounds it was highly Bard as'a limited ABM deployment
ineffective, around Moscow, the Pentagon says
McNamara announced Monday a line of missile type complexes
;hat the time is ripe for the Unit- has been emplaced in the Tallin
|d States to begin building an an- area of Russia and must be credit-
timissile shield-but not as a coun- d with some missile-intercept
termove to the Soviets. The main lapability.
?urpose is to be able to ward off There is more recent evidence
a possible low-scale nuclear attack ;hat installations are being built
by Communist China in the 1970s. by the Russians in the Ural moun-
McNamara made a point of ap- ;ains facing Communist China.
pealing to Moscow to negotiate an Scientists say there is no sub-
agreement to limit the nuclear ' tantial evidence these are anti-
arms race, and the State- Depart- :missile batteries.
ment restated that view yesterday. The United States is far fron
McNamara further made clear aaving a missile defense. It may
he would resist. pressures to ex- be five years, or around 1972,
oand the $5-billion "thin" defense efore the Nike-X system is fully
nto a full blown, $40-billion shield' perational.
Igainst a heavy Soviet nuclear as- This is about the time Commu-
nist China is expected to be pro-
He doubts that any known anti- ducing intercontinental ballistic
missile umbrella could success- missiles in quantity,
fully stave off the intensive decoy-

I,

PRESENTS

HAROLD PINTER'S

THE
GUEST

An estimated
were left homelessi

5,000 persons
and crop darn-

I5,

World News Roundup
By The Associated Press nored the order and walk
SAN FRANCISCO-The Califor- their jobs six hours ahead of
nia Supreme Court has ruled that night strike deadline.
San Francisco voters should have The union claimed Pan A
the chance to express their opin- not want to start negotiatio
ion-on the ballot-on America's a new contract despite an
involvement in Vietnam. from the National Med
The court, in a 6 to 2 decision Board. The old contract e
Monday, ordered the San Francis- March 16.
co registrar of voters to take steps * *
to put on the Nov. 7 city ballot SAIGON - The directo
a measure urging an immediate three senior staff membersc
cease-fire and U.S. withdrawal ternational Voluntary S e r
from Vietnam. (IVS) today announced the
Citizens for a Vote on Viet- signations in protest against.
nam said it had collected 22,000 ican policies in Vietnam.
signatures on, a petition to place The four made public an'
a declaration of policy on the Viet- letter" to President Johnson
nam war on the November' muni- was signed by 49 of the 15
cipal ballot. It said 12,000 signa- workers in South Vietnam.
tures were needed. The letter called for de-e
* * * tion of the war, a halt i
NEW YORK-A federal judge bombing of North Vietnam
yesterday barred a strike against ognition of the National Li
Pan American World Airways, but tion Front and the turning
ground employes in Honolulu ig- of the Vietnam questiont

ed off
f mid-
m did
ns on
order
diation
xpired
r and
of In-
'vice
eir re-
Amer-
"open
which
2 IVS
escala-
n the
, rec-
,ibera-
g over
to an
ion.

TODAY
at GUILD HOUSE

I

I ALAN BATES
ROBERT SHAW

(British title:
The Caretaker)

1

DONALD
PLEASENCE

filled barrage of warheads that a
technologically advanced enemy
-ould hurl against it.
Two long-range missiles appar-
ently make up the Soviet ABM.
By contrast the United States
system will have one 400-mile}
range interceptor, the Spartan,I
plus the smaller, high-acceleration
Sprint which will leap up 25 miles
high to catch warheads eludingI
Spartan.
Current plans call for the de-
ployment of about 12 Spartan bat-
;eries interspersed throughout the
United States-at least one in
every region.
Spartan will knock down in-
::oming missiles outside the at-
nosphere, providing the area de-
fense of Nike-X. Sprint provides
;he point, or individual target,
protection.

802 Monroe
Mme. LE TH I ANH
Vietnamese Poetess and Author

"A fascinating, funny,
-eerie film."-KAUFFMAN
-THE NEW REPUBLIC
"BRILLIANT!"--4-N.Y. POST
"BRILLIANT!"-N.Y. TIMES

Will Discuss

"THE NATIVE STRANGER
IN VIETNAM"

FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
7 and 9:15 P.M.

I

Luncheon 25c
12 Noon

SPONSORED BY VIETNAM FALL

Auditorium A
Angell Hall 50c

i ' '

r

so

international peace commissi

CORRECTION
NO VOICE-SDS
MEETING TONIGHT-

- -t

THIS WEEK AT:
Te ARKGe
1421 Hill Street
featuring folk, classical, Blues, and Bluegrass music by
local artists. Bring your instrument and sing along or
just come to listen. 50c cover includes entertainment
and light refreshments'
Friday-8:30 P.M.-THE LAURALEI
(Laura Stevenson & Laura Halferd) singing English
and Scottish Ballads.
Saturday-8:30-BOB WHITE
(from San Diego, California) singing Traditional and
Contemporary Folk Music playing Guitar and Autoharp.

CINEMBULD
PRESENTS
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the 60's (& 70's)
Nw CinA

IE
li
a"
EEi
(l
j

1.

PROGRAM NO. 2

AMERICAN OPINION FORUM OF ANN ARBOR

Concerttof M. Kabal
Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
All Boys Are Named Patrick
Jean-Luc Godard, France
Ai! Yoji KurI, Japan
Act Without Words Guido Bettiol, France
ActuaTilt Jean Herman,_France

presents

IN CONCERT

Mr_ Cnrv Allan

I

m 11

III

i

I

E

at.t U - - r. ® s

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