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September 19, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1967

THE I~HCHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTE1~ER 19, 1961

UN Lacks World Confidence;
Begins 22nd Session in Crisis

. ..... - -- - - ------------- - --- ---- - -------- - - -, , '' I - -- - - " , 111 - I -I

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UNITED NATIONS (A')-As the
UN General Assembly opens its
22nd session this week it faces a
new crisis of confidence as a re-
sult of inability so far to cope
with the aftermath of the Middle
East war.
Once more the question is being
raised whether it can deal effec-
tively with international problems
or whether it must be recognized
as nothing more than a glorified
debating society.

colonial questions, the Western there will be resolutions on dis-
powers usually can count on I armament, China representation.
enough support from so-called colonial problems and economic
nonaligned countries to avert such and social matters.
deadlocks. I The Middle East problem con-
As a result, the assembly is tinues to be a major issue. Viet-
expected to adopt many resolu- nam also will figure in the debate,
tions during the next three as it has in the past, without be-
months on the 95 items o:n its j ing formally on the agenda. There
agenda. Some of these will be is little prospect of any signifi-
simple housekeeping decisions, but I cart action on either problem.
--- - --- ------ ---- --- ---- --- --
Israel Welcomes Unofficial
Produce Trade with Jordan

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
Panel Discussion Following Services
What are the details of the current law? What are some
practical alternatives that undergraduates and gradu-
ates can use this year? What is the nature of conscien-
tious objections?

The answer appears
cmtxh~r in hP .CtP

to lieI

-Associated Press
FLOWERY ORATOR FROM ILLINOIS
"Rosy"-cheeked Senate minority leader Everett Dirksen takes a closer look yesterday at a replica of
a Tournament of Roses float which bears his likeness done up in flowers. Rep. H. Allen Smith (R-
Calif.) beams in the background at a ceremony in which the senior senator from Illinois was named
Grand Marshall of the 1968 Tournament of Roses. Unfortunately, the bust contains no specimens
of Dirksen's perennial nominee for national flower-the marigold.
UNEASY ARMISTICE:
Press Government Relations
Sho Strain in South Vietnam

somewnerein petween
The assembly has demonstrated
through the years that it is a de-
bating society and a glorified one
at that, since it represents all UN
countries and is attended by prime
ministers, presidents, foreign min-
isters and other world figures. It
also has demonstrated, despite
failures, that it can get results
at times.
Old UN hands recognize its
limitations. They also recognize
that the 122-nation assembly of
1967 is not the same as the 51-
nation assembly of 1946. It not
only has become more wordy and
slower-moving because of the
membership explosion; it has been
split into powerful blocs and coali-
tions that often can wield an un-
official vote.
In the early days, the assembly
was dominated by the Western
powers. Now the newly emerged
nations of Asia and Africa can
join with the Soviet bloc to pre-
vent the West from obtaining a
two-thirds majority. The West, on
the other hand, can prevent the
coalition from achieving the re-
quired two-thirds. This happened
at the summer's emergency ses-
sion on the Middle East, when no
major resolution was adopted.
Fortunately, the nations do not
always vote by blocs. Except on

WADI YUBAS, Jordan (A) -
Arab and Israeli leaders may not
face each other across a peace
table but down here in the Jordan
River valley there is a brisk busi-
ness between the enemy terri-
tories. For more than two months,
Jordanian t r u c k s have been
wheeling down sandy banks be-
tween the two hostile forces and
shooting up spray from a shallow
ford as they cross to the Israeli-
occupied west bank.
They return with ripe melons,
fruit, vegetables, soap, furniture
and whatever else the Israelis will
allow.
The setup appears beneficial to
both sides. The Israelis are avoid-
ing glutted produce markets, and
the Jordanians get not only food
from what was their prime agri-
cultural region but much-needed
foreign curreftcy by selling it to
other Arab countries.
Moreover, one source said, both
countries collect customs duties.I

The bleak area where the dry:
Wadi Yubas channel joins the
Jordan is more suited to camels
than wheeled vehicles but the
Arab drivers maneuver their big
trucks through the sand and rocks,
as though they were on solid
macadam.
Lately, watermelons have been
a big item. Seventy thousand tons
of the melons were ripening on the
west bank when the Israeli army
threw the Jordanians back across
the river in June.
Israel has more than enough of{
its own watermelons,and an in-
flux from the occupied territory
could have flooded the Israeli
markets and brought serious eco-
nomic problems.
So, winking at the cross-Jordan
trading, the Israelis have told
Arab farmers to sell their produce
where they can. The same word
has gone out to orange and ba-
nana farmers around Jericho.

REV. EDGAR EDWARDS
Oirector, Guild House
DR. ERWIN GAEDE
First Unitarian Church
ROBERT HAUERT
Office of Religious
Affairs

LARRY KATZ
Administrative Assistant
to the University
Registrar
DR. NICHOLAS
KAZARI NOFF
Professor of Math
DR. HERBERT KELMAN
Professor of Psychology

0'

JOHN SONQUIST
Study Director, Survey Research Center
C.O. Counsellor, Ann Arbor Friends Center

JOHN PLANER, Cantor
Choir Directed by STEVEN OVITSKY
JOAN SPITZER, Organist

iI

1429 Hill Street

All Are Welcome

Daily Classifieds Get Results

F,

I

SAIGON (P)-The uneasy armis-
tice between South Vietnam's
government and the nation's
newspapers is showing signs of
strain.
In the past few days both sides
have engaged in a little muscle-
flexing to test the other's inten-
tions.,
The government issued a state-
ment warning of "regrettable neg-
ligence" on the part of certain
newspapers. The papers responded
with editorials saying that the
good name of the regime would
depend in large part on its ability
to accept criticism.
Standoff
For the moment the situation
appears to be a standoff. The gov-
ernment ended political censor-
ship a month before the Sept. 3
presidential and senatorial elec-
tions and this appears sure to con-
tinue through the Oct. 22 elections
for a House of Representatives.
The new legislature then will
have the task of writing a press
law within the framework of the
constitution. In practice the gov-
ernment will retain power over the
press until a new law is adopted.
While political censorship has
been ended, the government re-
tains newsprint supply and licens-
ing controls over the papers and
ultimately the power to suspend
any of them.
Sensitive Rulers
Directly and indirectly, the mil-
itary rulers have shown extreme
sensitivity to certain subjects. The
feud between President-elect Ngu-
yen Van Thieu and Vice-Presi-
dent-elect Nguyen Cao Ky is one
of these subjects.
Stories of regional or religious
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
* NO WAITING
- 8 BARBERS
I OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

differences between Northerners
and Southerners, Roman Catho-
lics and Buddhists or among the'
various religious sects frequently
grate on some sensitive nerves.
The English - language Saigon
Daily News commented over the
weekend: "The press has never
been free in this unfortunate
country. Although press censor-
ship no longer prevails, it is no
secret that the present press regu-
lations still forcefully act as
Damocles sword above journalists'
heads."
Stop Conference
The paper pointed to the gov-
ernment's efforts last week to stop
a news conference being held by
defeated presidential and sena-
torial candidates. The losers final-
ly held an unruly meeting after a
policeman showed up to stop them
and then left after issuing a
warning.
The news conference also bore
witness to the politicians' redis-
covery of the press as a vehicle
for their own views. After a long
period of censorship the press has
openly enjoyed printing some of
the uninhibited statements now
being made. With about 30 Viet-
namese, Chinese, French and
English newspapers in Saigon, the

politicians are sure to get atten-
tion.
The minister of information
issued a statement last week prais-
ing most of the papers for their
"spirit of responsibility."

I

I

LAST CHANCE!

LAST CHANCE

'1

EXPO '67

$7900

0
0

October 13-October 15
See Expo before it closes; this is
the event of the decade.
The price includes:
ROUND TRIP AIR TRANSPORTATION
HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS
EXPO PASSPORTS
EXPO GU I DEBOOK
Limited Reservations, So HURRY!
CALL
JOHN GUNNING
761-1907
OR
STUDENT TOURS
20930 Mack, Grosse Pointe Woods
886-0844

I

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SENIOR ICT ES

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102.9 F.M.

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ROBIN BROWN
Broadcasting
"MUSIC FOR MODERNS"
Mon. thru Fri
9 P.M.-12 Midnight

CONTACT LENS WEARERS SAVE MONEY ON YOUR NEEDED SUPPLIES
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.

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Today thru Saturday

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Oct. 8-3 P.M.
"The nImmediate
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67
TICKET SALES:
Diag-10 A.M.-3 P.M.

4

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MARK LANE
Sept. 27-8 P.M.
'Rust to Judgnaent"

I

all VOX records, mono & stereo
ONLY $1.19 per record
(does not include stereo boxes)
A JAZZ-FOLK SPECIAL
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Oct. 29-3 P.M.
"The Defense
Never Rests"

TICKETS:

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Student $3.00
Non-Student $5.00

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