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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 19, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

?AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 19, 1967

?AGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1967

Have you been searching for a
Restaurant-Cocktail Lounge
with romantic atmosphere
as well as fine food?'
then try the
Featuring
MONDAY ONLY
LIVE GREEK MUSIC AND DANCING
GREEK FOOD
Open Seven Days 3 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Serving Dinners 3 P.M. to I A.M.

ST. LOUIS CLINCHES PENNANT:

Bosox Nudge

Tigers;

Twins

Winl 2-0

d

By HOWARD KOHN
Special To The Daily
DETROIT-It was a game of
surprises, but Boston. kept the
faith and edged Detroit, 6-5 in 10
innings last night.
The Tigers' second straight loss
created a four-way tie for first
place, pending the outcome of the
Chicago-California game on the
coast.
Strongboys Carl Yastremski and

Dalton Jones knocked the Tigers
off the top with a pair of solo'
home runs in the ninth and tenth
innings.
Yastremski's blast, his '40th of
the year, tied the game in the
ninth and Jones won it in the
tenth. Mike Marshall, the fifth
Tiger pitcher, lost his second of
three decisions.
Jones and Yastremski combined
for seven of eleven Red Sox hits'

driving in four of the six runs.
They spoiled a number of impres-
sive individual performances by
the Tigers.
Norm Cash, struggling in a
slump all season, cracked his 20th
and 21st home runs to key two
Tiger rallies while Jerry Lumpe,
given a rare chance to start, slap-
ped three line singles and drove,

a single by Al Kaline, and a sacri-
fice bunt by Willie Horton.
Fred Lasher, however, failed to
live up to his highly-publicized
image as the Tiger's top fireman
giving up Yastremski's ninth in-
ning homer.
Detroit couldn't take advantage
of a final threat in the bottom of
the ninth when McAuliffe singled

I i

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402 MAYNARD ST.
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
One block from the Michigan Union

in two runs. Y and went to second on pitch-hitter
Fred Gladding, fighting off Eddie Mathews' infield grounder.
growing signs of mediocrity after Kaline walked, but Fickel Stanley,
a brilliant first half-season, pitch- subbing for Horton for1 defensive
ed 41/3 innings of shutout ball purposes, flied out to left.
after starter Denny McLain gave Rookie Jerry Stephenson started
up four runs in less than'three'in- for the Red Sox going the first
nings seven innings Jose Santiago, 4th
Unassisted DP Sox pitcher, won it by cooling the
And Dick McAuliffe trying to Tigers in the ninth and tenth.
make up for a two-base error he
committed earlier, tagged out Rico Twins Win in 10th
Petrocelli and beat Russ Gibson to BY The Associated Press
first base for an unassisted double KANSAS CITY-Ted Uhlaend-
play in the eighth inning. The er's tie breaking single in the 10th
double play ruined a Boston scor- inping and the six-hit pitching
ing chance. of Jim Kaat led Minnesota to a
Boston scored three times in the 2-0 victory over Kansas City last
first inning. Detroit bounced back night, snapping a three-game los-
with three in the second and the ing streak for the struggling Amer.:
Sox went ahead 4-3 in the third. ican League pennant contenders.
But Cash's second home run of Kaat, who went into the game
the night tied it in the sixth, and with an 0-4 season mark against
Jim Northrup's line double put the the la ,place A's. struck out 12
Tigers ahead in the bottom of the in winning a brilliant duel with
eighth. Northrup's double followed nas City's Jim "Catfish" Hun-
________ ter and bringing his record to 14-
13.
Hunter, 11-6, gave up only
three hits until the 10th, when
Bob Allison started the Twins'
} two-out rally with a single to
e. left. After Rod, Carew walked,
Pat Kelly ran for Allison and
Uhlaender snapped the scoreless

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
Boston 85 66 .563 -
x-Chicago 85 66 .563 -
Detroit 85 66 .563 -
Minnesota 85 66 .563 -
x-California 77 71 .520 6".
Washington 70 79 .40 14
Cleveland 71 81 .467 141..
Baltimore 68 81 .456 16
New York 66 85 .437 19
Kansas City 59 90 .396 25
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 6, Detroit 5 (10 inn)
Minnesota 2, Kansas City 0 (10 inn)
Baltimorea2, New York 0
California 1, Chicago 0 (5 inn)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at California (n)
Minnesota at Kansas City (t-n)
Boston at Detroit (n)
Washington at Cleveland (n)
New York at Baltimore (n)

x-St. La
San Fra
Chlicago
Cincinm
Philade
Pittsbui;
Atlanta
Los An
HoIustoll
New Y

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
ouis 95 56 .629
ancisco 81 68 .544
a 82 70 .539
ati 81 70 .536
Iphia 77 72 .517
rgh 75 76 .497
t 74 76 .493
geles 68 82 .453
62 88 .413
rk 56 93 .376

GB
13
14
17
20
201 ;
26'
32'.
38

x-Clinched pennant.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 7, Los Angeles 2
St. Louis 5, Piltadelphia 1
Cincinnati 4, Atlanta 0
Houston 14, Pittsburgh 4
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at NewYork (n)
St. Louis at Philadelphia (n)
San Francisco at Chicago
Cincinnati at Atlanta (n)
Pittsburgh at Houston (n)

4

d

deadlock with a line single to cen-
ter, scoring Kelly, and Carew al-
so scored when Joe Nossek bobbled
the ball'for an error.
The runs broke a string of 22
scoreless innings for the Twins,
who didn't get a runner past see-
ond base against, Hunter until the
10th while Kaat scattered five
singles and fanned 10 over the
first eight innings.
*: * * .
Cards Clinch Flag
PHILADELPHIA - The St. Louis
Cards clinched their 11th Na-
tional League pennant last night
with a 5-1 victory over the Phila-
delphia Phillies behind the three-
hit pitching of Bob Gibson.
Held without a hit for five in-
nings by lefty Dick Ellsworth, the
Cardinals erupted for four runs

KLH launches an inquiry into

"Subjective

Valu

in the sixth to make Manager
Red Schoendienst a pennant win-
ner in his third year at the helm.
Shortstop Dal Maxvill started St.
Louis' winning rally with a sin-
gle to left. Gibson sacrificed him
to second and Lou Brock dou-
bled scoring Maxvill. Julian Ja-
vier singled home Brock.
Cepeda Passed
After Curt Flood struck out,
Orlando Cepeda was purposely
passed. Mike Shannon doubled
scoring Javier, and Cepeda came
in on a throwing error by Cookie
Roj as.
Meanwhile, Gibson, who earned
hid 13th victory and third
straight since recovering from a
broken leg, limited the Phillies to
one run.
Other Games
In other action, three Baltimore
pitchers combined to shut out New
York as Baltimore edged the Yan-
kees 2-0.
In the National League, Deron
Johnson and Tony Perez smashed
home runs helping the Cincinnati
Reds to a 4-0 victory over the
Atlanta Braves as relief pitcher
Ted Abernathy recorded his 25th
save of the season.
Rookie Tom Seaver scattered
eight hits and Ken Boswell drove
in two runs in his first major
league start as the New York Mets
whipped Los Angeles 7-2 ending
a seven-game losing streak.
While in the Astrodome, Doug
Rader lashed four hits and drove
in four runs, leading the streak-
ing Houston Astros to a 14-4
romp over the Pittsburgh Pirates.

4

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(s

1

E

Professional Standings

Question #1
How much would you pay to keep
your wife one more year?

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
W L T Pet. PF1
Philadelphia 1 0 0 1.000 35
Dallas 1 0 0 1.000 21
Washington 0 1 0 .000 24
New Orleans 0 1 0 .000 13
Century Division 1
Pittsburgh 1 0A 1.000 41
New York 1 0 0 1.000 37
St. Louis 0 1 0 .000 20
Cleveland' 0 1 0 .000 14
Western Conference
Coastal Division
W L T Pct. PF
Baltimore 1 0 0 1.000 38
Los Angeles 1 0 0 1.000 27
San Francisco 1 0 0 1.000 27
Atlanta 0 1 0 .000 31
Central Division
Detroit 0 0 1 .000 17
Green Bay 0) 0 1 .000 17
Minnesota 0 1 0 .000 21
Chicago 0 1 0 .000 13
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 38, Atlanta 31
Pittsburgh 41, Chicago 13
Dallas 21. Cleveland 14
Detroit 17, Green Bay 17 (tie)
Los Angeles 27, New Orleans 13
New York 37, St. Louis 20
San Francisco 27, Minnesota 21
Philadelphia 35, Washington 24
FRIDAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at Los Angeles
Only game scheduled

PA
24
14.
35
27
13
20
37
21.
PA
31
13
21
38
17
17
27
41

Miami
Houston
Buffalo
New York
Boston

1 0 0 1.000 35 21

1
1
0
0

1
1
1
3

0
0
0
0

.500 40
.500 23
.000 17
.000 42

Western Division
Oakland 2 0 0 1.000
San Diego 1 0 0 1.000
Kansas City 1 0 0 1.000
Denver 1 2 0 .333
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Oakland 35, Boston 7
Miami 35, Denver 21
Houston 20, Buffalo 3
'Onlygames scheduled
SUNDAY'S GAMES
Boston at Buffalo
Houston at San Diego
Kansas City at Miami
New York at Denver

23
27
20.
89
7{
14
20
107

'4

86
28
25
47

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L T Pct. PF PA

4

DO YOU REMEMBER the game kids used
to play in school where you were asked how
much money it would take to get you to sell
your country's secrets? (Assuming no tor-
ture.) Or your dog?
It was a way of thinking about the value
you really placed on a thing.
One of the first things you learned was that
"features" had very little to do with it. (For
example, if your country had had 20 more
rivers, or your dog's tail wagged at 86 Per-
Minute-six less than an "average" dog's-
the answer would hardly have -changed.)
When KLH began making stereo equip-
ment ten years ago, our founders (K., L., and
H.) noticed that grownup manufacturers
talked as though features had everything to
do with value. We hated that. We still do.
"Feature": Injecting 380 horsepower into
cars that have no plausible market save those
who commute back and forth over the Bonne-
ville Salt Flats.
Or Again: Advertising 300 watts of power
in a high priced stereo console unit to give it
the appearance of value. (Neglecting to men-
tion that large numbers of watts have nothing
to do with hearing the music accurately, or
even loudly, both of which depend on what
kind of equipment you've squeezed the watts
into. 35 watts in good equipment will do far
better.)
42-22-36
To define worth solely in terms of features
is like determining the "market value" of a
wife from her height, age, weight, width of
smile, tendency to suntan evenly, and the
number of pounds of food she is capable of
cooking up in an evening.
It's true enough we all like to have some-
thing explicit- to help our thinking. Even
Consumer Reports will sometimes find itself
detailing competitive features and statistics;
akin to Playboy's 42-22-36 ratings.
But studying the centerfold and accom-
panying data simply doesn't give us all the
infnrmatinn we reallv need. What does? Well.

beloved baseball players can't get together
about which is best?)
Still, the principle of determining value
through testimonials makes very good sense:
-Economists, for instance, say value can be
understood as "some measure of the sense of
loss one experiences after being deprived of
a commodity or service," or, ask the man who
owns one how much he'd dislike losing it.
(The boy contemplating his dog's worth fig-
ured it out the same way.)
Any other way of measuring value, like
establishing a ratio between features and
price, is at best only a guess, made before any-
one could possibly know.
DEPRIVED OF YOUR WIFE
What we propose, then, is a technique of mea-
suring the sense of loss as a way of thinking
about "Subjective Value"; i.e., what a com-
modity means to someone who has it.
So. Assume for a moment that you are

about to be deprived of your wife. (Substitute
husband or "good friend" where applicable.)
How much would you pay in dollars to keep
her one more year? When you're through
thinking about that one, fillin No.1 and have
a look at the rest of the questionnaire.
You see what we're up to here.
We began on this idea because we already
have evidence (based upon a comparison of
the number of hours owners sit listening to
KLH phonographs as opposed to other
brands) that our $300 stereo system is cher-
ished somewhat more than at least one $400
system we could name; and perhaps twice as
much as another $300 set.
Doubtless the same situation exists among
magazines-some are surely valuednore than
others-or sewing machines, or autos, or
toothpaste. Toothpaste? Well, we'll soon see,
and if you're interested we will be pleased to
let you know what we learn.

well, here we go again. The Michigan Daily is once again offering
for your edification, entertainment, and amusement its world re-
nowned Grid Picks contest.
In the past, such prizes as a night on the town in Hamtramack
and two free passes on the Mackinac ferry 'have been awarded. This
year the prizes will be two free pizzas from Cottage Inn PLUS two
passes to the Michigan Theatre, now featuring "Up the Down Stair-
case.' These prizes will be awarded every week, unless we can come
up with something better.
Entry blanks are available at The'Daily, 420 Maynard, or circle the
winners on this handy form and mail in your entries.
Who knows, maybe you'll get your name misspelled in The Daily
as a Grid Picks winner.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

'p

CONTACT,
WEARERSM!

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Duke at MICHIGAN (Score)
Notre Dame at California
Penn at Navy-
Houston at Michigan State
Kentucky at Indiana
Utah at Minnesota
TCU at Iowa
Wisconsin at Washington
Northwestern at Miami (Fla)
Purdue at Texas A & M

11.
12.
13.
14,
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Illinois at Florida
Florida State at Alabama
Syracuse at Baylor
N. Mexico at Brigham Young
Dayton at Cincinnati
Mississippi St. at Georgia
Temple at Kings Point
SMU at Missouri
Texas at Southern California
St. Lawrence at Bates

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____________________________

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TENORS & BASSES
MICHIGAN'S CHOIRS FOR
NON-MUSIC MAJORS-

j

- -- - -O - --

ARTS CHORALE MICHIGAN SINGERS
WANT YOU !

Tuesday and Thu rsday-3:0

00-4:30
Angell Hall

Aud. C

If one or more of these questions interests you, then
kindly fill in the blank spaces that apply and mail to
the address we have listed at lower right. For our
part, we will gladly send you a tally of the results of
this questionnaire, and others we are doing in subse-
quent ads, if you also add your name and address.
Thank you.
1 (See Headline.)
2 Are you a subscriber to this publication?-
If not, do you read every issue of it?
If your answer is yes to either of these, and you
were informed that because of financial difficul-
ties' the publication might discontinue publish-
ing, how much would you be willing to pay for
one more issue rather than be deprived of it?
One more year's subscription? -
3 Do you have telephone service at home?
If yes, assume you now pay an average of $20
monthly for this service. How much additional
would you pay, rather than be deprived of it?
4 The automobile you now own was purchased in
what year? . At what price?,

might go out of business. How much would you
be willing to pay, above its present cost, to have
one more tube, rather than be deprived of it?
7 Assume for a moment that an offer was being
made for your wife's wedding dress. How much
would you be willing to sell it for?
What does your wife say?
8. Do you own stereo equipment at home?
A. console? - A one-piece table model?
A three-piece system? Components?
Which make(s)?
How much did it cost you to buy?
How long ago? , If you were about to
be deprived of the set you now own, and knew
you could not get another of the same kind, how
much would you be willing to pay to keep it?
(If you worry that by putting your name below
you may be subjecting yourself toa barrage of
KL1H literature, or that we may send a salesman
around, or sell your name to some "list house,"
.n,* oin; Wi, iWwon' thn h ghifou nwonld like to

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