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September 17, 1967 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-17

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY", SEPTEMBER 17,1967

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICUI(AN DAILY SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17. 1967

Indian Leaders Worry That Foreign Aid PURGE OR SUICIDE?:
Develous 'Relief Mentality' Among Poor Ex-Deputy's Death Threat to Nasser

---. ,,,., ,,. ..., _...,.._.iii-- - _..,. .... .... _ . .. _.....,..,. .. . *1.., .. ,.

NEW DELHI (P) - India has
received billions of dollars worth
of foreign aid. Responsible for-
eigners and Indian leaders are
beginning to wonder if a "relief
mentality" has been created.
They fear that perhaps in some
ways things have been made too
easy for the Indian people in their
quest for industrial development,
agricultural self-sufficiency and
20th-century living.
Numerous critics in Parliament
have complained that the massive
American food aid, while helping
to keep millions of Indians alive,
has slowed India's initiative to
produce enough food to meet its
own needs.
Drought Effects
The problem has become magn-
ified this year, with a world-wide
aid effort to help India through
the aftereffects of its worst
drought.
The aid effort was centered in
Bihar State, a backward area in
eastern India along the southern
Nepalese border.
Through the years, nature
helped the Biharis to sustain
themselves without too much ef-
fort. The Granges flooded every
spring and deposited new layers
of rich silt over the flat plains.
All the Biharis had to do was

sprinkle some rice seed and wait Bihar seem agreed that such an

Associated Press News Analysis over power in Egypt in a lightning.
WASHINGTON - The reported bloodless coup.

for a new crop of food.I

attitude is prevalent, Some

But there came to be too many!
people, too many cattle, and no
improvement in agricultural meth-+
ods. A drought of two years
brought the threat of millions
of starvation deaths.7
Lazy, StupidI
Some people, even Indians, have
come to refer to the Biharis as1
lazy or stupid. Knowledgeable
authorities say malnutrition over
among thousands a few genera-,
tions has causedapermanent men-
tal retardation among thousands.
of people.
An excess of cattle led to over-
grazing, followed by soil erosion,+
which worsened the situation.
Today, on vast tracts of land
in Bihar, people are trying to
grow rice in soil hardly fit for
grazing by goats.
One highly placed Indian offi-
cial who made an extensive tour+
of Bihar said the people there are
paying the penalty 'for years of
idleness.{
"The economic cost to the na-
tion is hundreds of millions of
rupees a year," he said, with
reference to wasted resources.+
American Embassy sources refuse
officially to discuss the question1
of "relief mentality." But foreign-+
ers working on relief programs in

Corps volunteers say the3
become more demanding
day.
One relief director ona
amination tour of some ha
Bihar districts reported the
demanded food, milk orn
Some were noticeably angry
they found he had brough n
in his "big Jeep."

Peace suicide of the veteran soldier who Their joint grasp on power last-
people until two weeks ago was Egypt's ed 15 years and appeared unassail-
every No. 2 man is certain to pose new able until Nasser last May moved
threats to President Gamal Abdel troops into the Sinai Peninsula to
an ex- Nasser's tenuous hold on power in confront Israel and barred the
ard-hit the country he led to a disastrous Aqaba Gulf to Israeli shipping.
people confrontation with Israel last In the disaster that followed,
money. June

y
'',G
r
t
4 y
i C
i t

The Cairo announcement said
Amer, 47, had taken his life with
poison Thursday after several pre-
vious attempts at suicide since
the Middle East war in June. In
Beirut's first editorials on Amer's
death, censors carefully crossed
out all references that appeared to
question whether Amer's death
was actually a suicide.
Solid diplomatic sources say
Amer was indeed plotting to oust
Nasser with the intention of blam-
ing the Soviet Union for not com-
ing to Egypt's aid actively in the
June war with Israel.

!-
University Activities Center
Contemporary Discussion Committee
ANNOUNCES PETITIONING
For 1968 Symposium Chairman
Petitions are available
in the STUDENT OFFICES, MICHIGAN UNION
2:00 PM -5:00 PM. Daily
or
in HENDERSON ROOM, MICHIGAN LEAGUE
2:00 PM -4:00 PM Monday, Wednesday Friday

,iv e . . ,
y when The offical Cairo radio reported
nothing late Friday that Field Marshal
Abdel Hakim Amer, 48, former

Kuldip Nayar, general manager first vice president and deputy
of United News of India, wrote commander of Egyptian armed
after a trip to Bihar that hunger forces, had taken his life by poi-
had sapped the "vigor and van- sonytedahofNseol
ity" of its people, Only the death of Nasser could
have a greater impact on Egyptian
"Now they' are a multitude of p ublicoino.
dependents. Their response to ; iAmer opinion.
Amrhas been 'the closest con-
work is just not there," Nayar fident of Nasser since the days
said. "And no amount of appeal or when both served in the Egyptian
threat can make them lift their army under British tutelage dur-
little finger. ing World War II.
"The government wants to close In the hot desert wastes of the
down some free kitchens, or at Sudan, where ex-King Farouk's
least cut the quantum of dole. secret police exiled them for sus-
But so loud is the protest against pected activities against the state,
such a move that the policy now and later in the 1948 campaign
is to allow things to continue against Israel, Amer and Nasser
as they are." plotted the formation of a free
On a visit to Gaya, a city in one oficers movement inside the Egyp-
of the worst-affected districts, this tian army to overthrow Farouk.
reporter found that many of the The plot was brought to fruition
persons visiting a free feeding kit- in the early hours of July 23, 1952,
chen run by a Hindu organization when Nasser, Amer and a handful
were professional beggars. of other young army officers took
AL BULLETIN'

Amer was singled out as a scape-
goat by Nasser, who also claimed!
Israel's quick victory resulted from
active U.S. military aid to the Is-1
raeli air force.-
Amer wastfired and Egyptians,
accustomed to seeing him always
at Nasser's side, were puzzled. In
the tradition of Middle East fatal-
ism, however, they accepted what
seemed an accomplished fact.
Then, on Sept. 4, Amer and 50
officers were rounded up and
placed under arrest on charges
of attempting to overthrow Nas-
ser.
Amer's reported death in these
circumstances places new burdens
on the already overstrained Egyp-
tian public credibility.
His alleged suicide was an-
nounced after his burial-and co-
incidentally just in time for the
first Saturday edition of Cairo's
semi-offical newspaper Al Ahram,
published by Nasser's longtime
crony, Mohammed Heikal.
Questions are being raised about
whether Amer was in fact a sui-
cide or a victim of Nasser's merci-
less purge of suspected opponents.
The government delayed an-
nouncement of the suicide for
more than 24 hours apparently to
head off any public upheaval.
But all indications from Cairo
yesterday were that the nation
was quiet. One Beirut newspaper
reported from Cairo that there
was not even a sign of public grief,
although Amer once had been a
popular figure.
Hours after Cairo's announce-
ment Friday night rumors spread
in foreign capitals that, in a fol-
low-up to the death, Nasser had
resigned. The rumorse were quick-
ly denied by an Egyptian govern-
ment spokesman in Cairo.
Radio Cairo broadcast its usual
programs yesterday and airline
flights continued into the Egyptian
capital.,

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibiilty. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 17
Day Calendar4
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar--"Management of Managers No.
37: 146 Business Administration Bldg.,
7 to 9 p.m.
ORGAN IZAT ION
EINOES
USE OF. THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.
The University of Michigan Dames
wish to extend a cordial welcome to
all student wives to attend their first
general meeting of the year. The af-
fair will be held on the second floor
ballroom of the Michigan Union, Mon.,
Sept. 18, at 8 p.m. Refreshments will
follow the meeting. As a married stu-
dent, wife of a student or intern, you
are eligible to join Dames.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., holds worship services at
9:30 & 11 a.m., supper at 6 p.m.,
speaker at 7 p.m. on Sun., Sept. 17.
* * *
Hillel sponsors events: Sept. 17 -
Folk dancing, 2 p.m., Mincha-Ma'ariv,
5:30 p.m., Sept. 19-Hebrew classes -
elementary, 7 p.m., advanced, 8:45 p.m.
* * *
La Sociedad Hispanica plans coffee,
conversation, Hispanic music, Mon.,
Sept. 17, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Plans for the semester will be discuss-
ed. Anyone interested invited.
* * *
Communications Sciences Lecture Se-
ries invite you to hear Dr. William
Uttal, "Psychophysical Discriminabil-
ity of Nerve Action Potential Patterns,'-
Sept. 19, 4:10 p.m., Michigan Union.
Room 3A.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, holds worship services at
9:45 & 11:15 a.m., Sun., Sept. 17. Bible
class at 11:15 a.m. Fellowship supper,
6 p.m., followed by the film, "A Time
for Burning."
* * *
Guild House sponsors Monday noon
luncheon, Sept. 18, 802 Monroe.

General Notices
The Michigan Memorial Phoenix Proj-
ect: Invites requests for faculty re-
search grants to support research with-
in the scope of the term "peaceful uses
of nuclear energy." Typical areas in
which the Project is interested are:
Biological effects of radiation, radia-
tion dosimetry, new uses of isotopes,
new tracer techniques, direct conver-
sion of nuclear energy to electrical
energy, the fusion process, plasmas as
related to controlled fusion, radiation
chemistry, nuclear weapons prolifera-
tion and disarmament, psychological at-
titudes toward nuclear energy haz-
ards, evaluation of hazards to urban
populations from nuclear activities,
and economic studies of nuclear ac-
tivities including power production.
New research ideas and pilot proj-
ects are particularly encouraged. The
relationship to peaceful uses of nu-
clear energy, however, must be clear.
The routine use of isotope tracer
techniques will not by itself justify
support.
Requests for grants of $3000 or less
are most appropriate. Grants may cov-
er equipment, supplies, research as-
sistance and field trips. Applications
for these grants should be returned
to the Phoenix Project by Mon., Sept.
25, 1967. Grants will be made by Nov.
15, 1967.
Application blanks may be obtained
from the office of the Phoenix Proj-
ect at the Phoenix Memorial Labora-
tory on the North Campus or by call-
ing 764-6213.
Chemistry Lecture: Dr. N. V. Subba
Rao, professor of chemistry, Osmania
Univ., Hyderbad, India, will speak on
"Chemical Components of Mundlea Spe-
cies," Mon., Sept. 18, in Room 1300
Chemistry Bldg., 4 p.m.
Senate Assembly Meeting-Mon., Sept.
18, Room 100 Hutchins Hall, 3:30 p.m.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago,
Ili.-Mgr. International Finance. Mktg.
Res. Anal. Copywriter (international).
Auditors. Financial Trainees. Traffic
Anal./Compensation Anal. Inventory
Controller. Microbiologist. Anal. Sci. Da-
ta Syst. Medical Writer. Info. Sci. Anal,
Chem. Dev. Chem. Pharmacology.
Local Organization-Engineers, Man-
agement and Technical Personnel for
new plant in Ann Arbor area. Electron-
ic Specialists, solid state and thin
films, and instrumentation personnel.
Dept. of the Army, Army Map Serv-
ice, Corps of Engineers, Wash., D.C. -
Cartography, Math, Geodesy, Astrono-
my and Computer Sci. majors needed.
Applications and further information at
Bureau.
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
TEACHER PLACEMENT:
The following vacancies have been
recorded for the present semester:
Albion, Mich. (P.S.)-Elem., J.H. Boys
PE.

Cassopolis, Mich. (P.S.) - Spanish,
Guidance Counselor.
East Detroit, Mich. (P.S.) - Sr. Hi
Eng., J.H. Eng., J.H. Type A, Speech
Therapy, Sch. Psychologist, Sch. Social
Workers.
Port Huron, Mich. (Port Huron Area
School Dist.)-S.H. Wood Shop, S.H.
Metal Shop, S.H. Drafting, S.H. Home
Ec., J.H. Science, J.H. Remedial Read-
ing, J.H. Spanish, J.H. Music (inst. &
vocal), Elem., 1st, Elem. 4th, Teacher
of Mentally Handicapped, Teacher of
Deaf & Hard-of-Hearing, School So-
cial Worker, Diagnostician, Teacher of
Orthopedically Hand.
Greenwich, Conn. (P.S.)-School So-
cial Worker, Remedial Reading, Teach-
er Elem.
Suffield, Conn.-S.H. Earth Science
Instructor.
Alsip, Il. (Dist. 126 Elem. Schools)-
Elem. 2nd, Primary Grade Teacher, In-
termediate Grade Teacher.

Roselle, Ill. (Lake Park High School)
-S.H. Physical Science, S.H. Math, S.H.
Ind. Arts.,
Waukegan, Ill. (Waukegan Township
High School)-11-12th Ind. Arts, 10th
Driver Ed., Teacher for Educable Men-
tally Handicapped Program, Teacher
of Slow Learners.
* * *
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB, 764-
7459.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT MEET-
ING: No. 1 "Engineering Opportuni-
ties." Discussion of opportunities for
current engineering graduates, demand,
salaries, etc. First of four meetings.
Primarily for seniors and graduate stu-
dents, but open to all interested. Prof.
J. G. Young, Sept. 18, 4 and 7:30 p.m.
(Afternoon and evening meetings will
be the same.) Room 311 West Engineer-
ing Bldg.

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BARRY GOLDWATER
Oct. 8-3 P.M.
"TheImmediate
Concern"

617
TICKET SALES:
Diag-lO A.M.-3 P.M.
H ill Aud.-10 A.M.-3 P.M.
North Campus Commons

SEMINAR in PAUL TILLICH
An introduction to the thought of the late world-renowed theologian, espe-
cially as it relates to the conquest of anxiety. The five seminar sessions,
sponsored by The Office of Religious Affairs and led by Lloyd W. Putnam,
will begin with the showing of four films in which Professor TIlich dis-
cusses various aspects of philosophy, psychotherapy, and relgion. Discus-
sions following the films will deal with concerns prompted by them, but
will chiefly focus on a study of Tillich's book "The Courage To Be" (Yale
paperbound). The films and discussions are open to all students.
PLACE-CANTERBURY HOUSE, 330 MAYNARD ST., Thursday evenings
at 7:30 beginning September 21, 1967

1

MARK LANE
Sept. 27-8 P.M.
"Rush to Judgment"
TICKETS: Series

F. LEE BAILEY
Oct. 29-3 P.M.
"The Defense
Never Rests"

CONVERSATIONS WITH PAUL TILLICH (FILM SERIES) I "THE COURAGE TO BE" (BOOK DISCUSSION SERIES)

Sept. 21-j-7:30 P.M. I) Tillich discusses influences upon his
thinking, defines and discusses existentialism.
*Sept. 28-7:30 P.M. I) The place of religion in the philosophy
of life, morality vs. moralism, the latent vs. the mani-
fest 1'church.

Sept. 21-8:00 P.M.
Sept. 28-8:00 P.M.
Oct. 5-8:00 P.M.

"Being and Courage"
"Types of Anxiety"
"Pathological Anxiety and Courage"

I
II
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Student $3.00
Non-Student $5.00

I

t .. n n n n itr.l _. . _ -- - .

_n_ -- _n_. 11

III

I

BISHOP JAMES PIKE

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