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September 15, 1967 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Mi'IDAY, $EPTEMBER 15, 1967
4,Pool
By FRED LaBOUR
Daily News Analysis
The creaky roof that has at-
tempted to shelter the University's
weakened intramural program
from the problems of neglect, lack
of planning, lack of funds and an
amazing lack of communication,
has literally begun to crumble.
On Tuesday night a section of
the IM pool ceiling collapsed and
crashed down into the pool area.
The pool was not in use at the
time and there were no casualties.
It appears, however, that it will
not reopen for what associate di-
rector of intramurals Dr. Rodney
Grambeau calls "an indefinite per-
iod of time." According to Gram-
1-beau, the collapse was apparently
caused by rain and melted snow
seeping through the decrepit roof
and weakening the beam structure.
Five Year Delay
Theoretically, the IM building
was due for a new roof five years
ago but a frustrating maze of bu-
reaucratic red tape and an admin-
istration that appears to be deaf
to the entire IM problem have
prevented any constructive work
from being accomplished.
This story of delayed action be-
cause of administrative bungling
is repeated again and again by
Grambeau as he reflects on the
current IM situation. "There is ab-
solutely no coordination between
projects or plans on campus," he
says. "We are not even in com-
munication with the people who
are supposed to be working on our
recommendations. Our hands are
tied."
Grambeau cites the Wines Field
redevelopment project to illumin-
ate his point. Wines Field was sup-
posed to be graded and replanted
over the summer. The field itself
was to be laid out so as to include
Behind
Closed
Doors
(Continued from Page 8)
another sense. It exists in a polit-
teal environment, and must res-
pond to the wishes and desires of
its constituent groups.
One final base to be touched
is student participation on the
Board. For many years, this is one
area where the students have had
a role in decision-making. I am
not sure this apparatus always
operated as well as it does now,
but as far as my experience is
concerned, I have been deeply
impressed by the attention given
to the student position. The Board
has always appeared anxious to
obtain the views of its student
members, who have an equal vote
with all other representatives.
This does not mean that I al-
ways agree with Board decisions,
being in the minority on more
than one issue in the past year.
However, I feel that the student
view is being listened to in a
constructive environment.
Pekhaps, the Athletic Board is
not a perfect forum, but I have
found it to be an honest one.
With the emperor now dethroned,
we proceed to problems.
NEXT WEEK: Conclusion -
The Big Squeeze.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE

Ceiling

Si

gnfies Collapse
Chicago Hangs On With Win

*4

ERA TERNITY

DR. RODNEY GRAMBEAU

more playing space and a $50,0001
lighting system.1
As any disgruntled student wio1
has attempted to use the field will
tell you, none of the improvements
have gotten beyond the planning
stage.
Is There a Schedule?
'We don't even know what the
schedule is for the field," declared
Grambeau. "At least If we had.
some idea we could replan our pro-
gram for this year, but we can't
even do that. We also have reason
to believe that the specific type of
lighting that we had recommend-
ed will not even be implemented.
We wanted lights on the field as
well as all around it to provide
maximum illumination, but ap-
parently the lights will be placed
on the perimeter of the field only.
This is to make room for some
kind of 'parade ground' that we
know nothing about."
Another worrisome problem for
the IM department is the critical
situation involving the hundreds of
students living in recently com-
pleted housing on North Campus.
"There is," says Grambeau, "no
plan whatsoever for organized rec-
reation on North Campus. The ad-
ministration failed to make any
allowance for recreation in the
plans for the residence halls."
Disorganized
The IM department has at-
tempted to include the North
Campus residents in Central Cam-
pus activities by combining four
of the houses and making them
into two composite units. This
move was possible because two
houses on Central Campus with-
drew from competition, as one
was converted to a girls' unit and
one to graduate housing.
Even these steps are not nearly
enough, according to Grambeau.
"The University makes them live
out there but then refuses to pro-
vide facilities and staff for an ade-
quate program of recreation. Log-
ically, the extra money for facili-
ties should have been included in
the building budgets, but obviously
it wasn't."
The house directors from North
Campus submitted a plan to the
IM department designed to give
everybody a chance at the lim-
ited facilities. They proposed a
lottery to decide which houses
would be allowed to participate in
each sport. Grambeau rejected the
proposal, saying "It would have
wrecked the system as we have it
now. If it had gone through, any
semblance of competition between
Swingline
Test yourself...
What do you see in the ink blots?
[1] A sizzling steak?
Ten dancers?
A rabbit?

houses would disappear as a team's
chances were decided by the luck
of the draw."
"What the North Campus situ-
ation boils down to is this," states
Grambeau: "We'll have two touch
football teams for 1200 men."
The only completed all-purpose
recreation unit on North Campus
has apparently gotten a heavy,
workout so far this year. The
units are designed to provide a;
maximum number of basketball,
tennis and volleyball courts with-
in the smallest possible area. A
series of these units is to be com-
pleted sometime in the fairly near
future but no one is quite sure
when.!
Grambeau was quick to point
out his lack of trust in the joint
swimming pool agreement between
the University and the city of
Ann Arbor. The Regentsappropri-
ated $212,000 out of an already
deficient IM budget to aid the
city in construction of an Olym-
pic sized pool to be placed be-
tween North Campus and Central
Campus.
Oh, Thank You
In return for the monetary co-
operation, University students will
be allowed to use the pool several
times during the week, to swim
during warm weather and skate in
the winter months. "They expect
this to solve the North Campus
problem," says Grambeau. "It's
only a drop in the bucket."
With the IM situation shifting
from the merely ludicrous to the
physically dangerous, as evidenc-
ed by the roof collapse, Grambeau
senses the need for a drastic
change in University policy.
"We're usually ranked about
fifth in the country on most
things," he says. "But on IM's
we'd be lucky if we were in the
top 500. The other schools in the
Big Ten, especially Michigan State,
Ohio State and Wisconsin, are
making tremendous progress in
these areas. Elsewhere around the
country, UCLA, a school with a
much greater problem as far as
being spread out goes, has a well
balanced and vigorous program.
Tradition?
"Michigan traditionallyhas led
the way in many areas," he con-
tinues. "Why do we have to be so
far behind everybody else in -this
one?
"What we need at this point is
a campus director of recreation.
Somebody to coordinate and over-
see everything that is going on.
Somebody who will take respon-
sibility for the mistakes. Some-
body who has lines of communi-
cation open to him so he can
plan in a more than haphazard
manner."

CHICAGO (P)-Don Buford hit
a grand-clam home run with two
out in the 10th inning last night,
lifting the Chicago White Sox to
a 4-0 victory over Cleveland be-
hind Cisco Carlos' five-hitter.
The victory, Chicago's second in

1

I

Major League Standings

-I

AMERICAN LEAGUE

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Boston .
Minnesota
Detroit
Chicago
California
Washington
Cleveland
New York
Baltimore
Kansas City

w
84
84
83
82
74
69
69
65
64
59

L
63
63
64
66
71
77
80
82
81
86

Pct.
.571
.571
.565
.554
.510
.473
.463
.442
.441
.4072

GB
1-
2Y
9
14
16
19
19
24

St. Louis
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Chicago
Philadelphia
Atlanta
Pittsburgh
Los Angeles
Houston
New York

w
91
80
80
79
75
74
73
66
59
55

L
56
66
67
70
69
72
74
79
88
91

Pct.
.619
.548
.544
.530
.521
.507
.497
.455
.401
.377

GB
10
11
13
14
162
18
24
32
35f2

extra innings from Cleveland in
two days, revived the White Sox'
pennant hopes, putting them 2%/
games behind first-place Minne-
sota and Boston in the red-hot
American League race.
Ron Hansen started the Chicago

rally in the 10th with a one-out
single. Tommie Agee ran for Han-
sen and raced to third on Duane
Josephson's single. Smoky Burgess
pinch hit for Carlos and drew an
intentional pass.
Indian reliever Orlando Pena
struck out pinch-hitter Ken Boy-
er, before Buford drove his fourth
homer of theseason into the right
field bleachers.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 4, Cleveland 0 (10 inn)
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at California (n)
Minnesota at Chicago (n)
Washington at Detroit (n)
Cleveland at New York (n)
Baltimore at Boston (n)

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta 5, New York 4
Only game scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Atlanta (n)
St. Louis at Cincinnati (n)
Los Angeles at Philadelphia (2, t-n)
San Francisco at Pittsburgh (n)
Only games scheduled

Frrar.

ri~ .11i1

I

O

reh epatkot
the inter-arts magazine
ACCEPTING CONTRIBUTIONS
Deadline, First Issue: Sept. 18
Student Publications Bldg. 420 Maynard St.

ILL

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Quid cunctaris? Obtine chartam!

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