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September 14, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-14

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TEMRrSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1967

PAGE SIX' THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 1967

TONIGHT
Friends of
Citizens for New Politics
NOMINATION FOR CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATE
Second Ward Student Campaign
Kickoff for getting on ballot
THURSDAY - 8 P.M.
Conference Room 4 of League

AMERICAN LEAGUE RAT RACE:

Tigers Win To Keep Pace with Leaders

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MIDDLEWEIGHT CLASSICS
RUGGED . .

By The Associated Press
DETROIT - Al Kaline smash-
ed three hits including his 24th
home run and scored three runs
and left-handed Mickey Lolich
won his sixth straight game on
a five-hitter as the Detroit Tigers
beat the Baltimore Orioles 6-1
last night.
The victory kept the third-place
Tigers one game out of the Amer-
ican League lead.
Lolich, 11-12, who lost 10 in a
row before beginning his winning
streak, struck out eight .and had
a two-hit shutout going until the
Orioles scored on Dave John-
son's double and Sam Bowens'
single in the seventh.
Horton Delivers
Willie Horton drove in the first
two Detroit runs with a triple in
the first inning. Utility man Dick
Tracewski hit his first homer of
the year off loser Pete Richert,
9-15, leading off the third and
Kaline, followed with his shot.
Detroit scored another run in
the fifth on Kaline'shdouble, a
wild pitch and Don Wert's'sacri-
fice fly.
Kaline, who singled and went to
third on Horton's double in the
seventh, scored the sixth Detroit
run when Baltimore relief pitcher
Bill Dillman committed a balk.
The Tigers finished the season
with a 15-3 edge on the defending

afternoon game from Kansas City play. Harrelson drew an inten-
4-2. tional walk, filling the bases.
Kaat had shut the Senators out Petrocelli then singled to left,
on six hits through the first eight scoring Adair with the game's
innings, but singles by Frank first run. Reggie Smith followed
Howard and Paul Casanova and with a fly to Mike Hershberger:
a double by Fred Valentine in in right field and Scott was de-
the ninth cut the Twins' lead to clared out on an appeal play for
3-1 with none out. catch was made. The play went
Oliva Hurt from Hershberger to catcher Dave
Tony Oliva left the game after Duncan to third baseman Sal,
crashing into the wall in right Bando.
attempting to catch Valentine's Two errors by first baseman
double. Scott enabled Kansas City to tie
Chance then came in from the the score in the fifth. Jim Gosger
bullpen for his second relief job reached first when Scott bobbled
of the season and, after giving his ground ball and Cater's
up a sacrifice fly to Frank Cog- single to left put runners on first
gins, struck out Mike Epstein and and second. After Bando popped
Cap Peterson ending the game. out, Scott made a diving stop of
Harmon Killebrew's 39th homer, Duncan's grounder, but threw wild
tying him for the league lead with to first on the single and Gosger
Boston's Carl Yastrzemski, gave raced home.
Minnesota a two-run lead in the * *
first inning and the Twins scored
their other run in the fourth on Other Ganles
a single by Oliva and a triple by In other American League ac-
Bob Allison. tion, three walks and three sin-
Kaat, winning his fourth straight -
and squaring his record at 13-13,
struck out nine and pitched outI
of a bases-loaded jam in the JM Jaflcu n Ii
eighth, getting Ken McMullen to
ground into a force play, ending
the frame. By The Associated Press

gles helped the New York Yan-
kees to a four-run sixth inning
and a 6-4 victory over the Califor-
nia Angels last night.
Cleveland and the Chicago White
Sox were tied 0-0 after 11 in-,
nings.
In the National League, Larry
Jackson, who had lost seven
straight games to St. Louis. pitch-
ed a brilliant two-hitter last night
leading Philadelphia to a 3-0 vic-
tory over the Cardinals.
Jackson, an ex-Cardinal, is 12-
13 for the season. He gave up a
single to Lou Brock in the fourth
and he was promptly erased on a
double play. Curt Flood doubled
in the ninth.
Another former Cardinal, Bill
White, touched off the Phillies
three-run fifth with a home run
off starter Dick Hughes, 14-6.
Singles by Clay Dalrymple and
Cookie Rojas, a sacrifice and Tony
Taylor's double accounted for two
more runs in the fifth.

Roberto Clemente got four hits
and drove in four runs and Pitts-
burgh took advantage of two Cin-
cinnati errors to score five times
in the seventh inning as the Pi-
rates crushed the Reds 11-3 last
night.
Tommie Sisk evened his record
at 12-12 going the distance. The
Pirates walloped four Cincinnati
pitchers for a total of 18 hits in
ending the Reds' winning streak
at four games.
Jerry Grote's two-out single
scored Ed Kranepool from second
base with the winning run in the
ninth inning as the New York
Mets shaded Atlanta 2-1 last
night.
Tom Seaver, a rookie right-
hander, went the distance for
New York and set a Met record
by winning his 14th game. He al-
lowed just four hits.
Los Angeles led San Francisco
4-1 after three innings.

A

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AL KALINE

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American League champion Or-
ioles.
Twins Win, 3-2
WASHINGTON - Dean Chance
came out of the bullpen in the
ninth inning last night and saved
a victory for the faltering Jim
Kaat as Minnesota beat Washing-
ton 3-2 and remained tied for the
American League lead.
The Twins are tied for first
place with Boston, which won an

reads Soph Parade

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Major League Standings

AMERICAN LEAGUE

Boston
Minnesota
Detroit
x-Chicago
California
x-Cleveland
New York
Baltimore
Kansas City

w
84
84
83
80
74
69
65
64
59

L
63
63
64
66
71
78
82
81
86

Pct. GB
.571 -
.571 -
.565 1
.548 3%4
.511 9
.469 15
.441 19
.441 19
.407 24

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
St. Louis 91 56 .619 -
x-San Francisco 80 65 .552 10
Cincinnati 80 67 .544 11
Chicago 79 70 .530 13
Philadelphia 75 69 .521 14,
Atlanta 73 72 .503 17
Pittsburgh 73 74 .497 18
x-Los Angeles 65 79 .451 24%
Houston 59 88 .401 32
New York 55 90 .379 35
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 2, Atlanta 1
Pittsburgh 11, Cincinnati 3
Philadelphia 3, St. Louis 0
San Francisco at Los Angeles (inc)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Atlanta (n)
Only game scheduled

Bosox Keep Pace
BOSTON - Rico Petrocelli's
two-run double highlighted a
three-run eighth inning yesterday
that carried the Boston Red Sox
to a 4-2 victory over Kansas City.
Petrocelli's two-out double broke
a 1-1 tie. The drive scored pinch-
runner Joe Foy and Ken Harrel-
son, who received an intentional
walk with two out. Reggie Smith's
single scored Petroedlli with the
third run.
The Red Sox took a 1-0 lead
in the fourth, but missed an op-
portunity to add to their total
when George Scott left third base
too soon after an outfield fly with
Ione out.
Jerry Adair opened the inning
with a single. After Carl Yas-
gled to center. Adair raced to
trzemski fouled out, Scott sin-
third and Scott to second on the

x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 4, Kansas City 2
Cleveland at Chicago (ine)
Detroit 6, Baltimore 1
Minnesota 3, Washington 2
New York 6, California 4
TODAY'S GAMES
Cleveland at Chicago (n)
Only game scheduled

Boldly styled.. masculine in every detail.
Yet inside, they're lined with silk-soft glove
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J

Michigan tight end Jim Man-
dich leads a group of college foot-
ball's newcomers who are about
to burst onto the varsity scene.
At 6'3" and 220 pounds, Man-
dich has been praised by Michi-
gan Coach Bump Elliott as "a
Ron Kramer type." Offensive line
coach Tony Mason even feels that
the sophomore will be the best
in the Big Ten at the tight end
slot.
Notre Dame and Michigan State
didn't rank 1-2 nationally last
season without some fancy re-
cruiting. To prove there's no let-
up, the Irish offer a trio of year-
lings-Jay Ziznewski, 6'7", 250
pounds; Mike McCoy, 6'7", 270
pounds, and Bob Jockisch, 6'3",
260 pounds-to go with veteran
Kevin Hardy on the defensive
front this season.
The Spartans counter with ace
defenders Rich Saul, an end, and
Steve Garvey, a halfback-not to
mention 6'5", 280 pound Lawrence
"Toddy" Smith, who is Baltimore
Bubba's little brother.
Speaking of relatives, sopho-
more running back Ted Koy-27
carries, 109 yards, three TD's in
spring games-reaches the Texas
varsity where his father and
older brother starred. On the same
squad is placekicker Rob Layne,
Bobby's boy.
Phipps Flips
At Purdue, the Boilermakers
are singing the praises of quarter-
back Mike Phipps and halfback
Don Webster while Wisconsin wel-
comes split end Mel Reddick and
back Stuart Voigt.
Minnesota turned loose an eye
opening battery of quarterback
Phil Hagen to flanker Mike Cur-
tis in the spring game. Result:
Hagen completed 8 of 12 passes
for 129 yards, Curtis caught four
for 150 yards.
On the national scene the scat-
backs may enjoy the limelight.
But the names for armchair
fans to remember start with Or-
ange Juice Simpson and Viice
Opalsky.

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JIM MANDICH

VAN BOVEN SHOES
17 Nickels Arcade

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clocking and notable track relay
credentials to go with his 6'1%",
203 pound measurements.
Tried at setback, flanker and
end, Simpson carried 24 times for
135 yards and caught two passes
for 49 more in a spring scrim-
mage, prompting a beaming Coach
John McKay to offer:
"He's a tough kid-and has to
be one of the fastest big guys of
all time."
A True Friend
Opalsky is a sophomore friend
indeed to the University of Miami
and although he has hurtled his
62", 206 pounds for 100 yards
in only 9.8, Charlie Tate isn't even
whimpering. Vince, from Turtle
Creek, Pa., holds the Miami fresh-
man rushing record and in the
spring windup ran and caught for
17 yards.
In the Rockies, there is no bet-
ter earlin y rosne t than Utah

The latter is the same school
where dimunitive Dan McKissic,
standing 5' and weighing 155
pounds, is now sewing up the
placekicking assignment.
While Tulsa's Crittendon may
be the biggest of the crop, 6'3',
306 pounds, he is not alone in
the size market. Some of the oth-
er top drawer defensive tackles
include Grambling's Clifford Gas-
per, Jr., 285; Indiana's Ed Harri-
son, 260, and New Mexico State's
Rick Hackley, 261, not to mention
offensive tackles Dennis Dulac,
275, of Memphis State and Carl
Ashman, 250, of Nebraska.
And there is good heft at mid-
dle guard in Baylor's Earl Max-
field, 258; Oregon State's Bill Nel-
son, 6'7", 245; Southern Mississip-
pi's Rex Barnes, 260, and Wash-
ington's Rick Sharp, 240. Mean-
while, at a mere 6'2"1, 220 pounds,
Nick Zuj of Niagara Falls,. Ont.,
has taken over the starter's role
at Kent State.
'Call Him Rich'
In the jawbreaker department,
try Army halfback Hank Andrze-
jjczak, 7.0 spring game rushing
average, and Syracuse quarter-
back Rich Panczyszyn, leader of
last year's unbeaten frosh ex-
pected to give the Orange even
more of a running attack.
Other top quarterbacks include
Colorado sensation Bob Anderson,
Indiana's Harry Gopso and a fel-
low who can really look over the
defenses, 6'7", 206 pound Frank
Patrick of Nebraska.
Other names to keep in mind
include UCLA split end George
Farmer, who averaged nearly 33
yards a reception as a freshman;
Texas Tech tight end Charlie
Evans, guards Dan Ryan of Cali-
fornia and Don Jordan of North
Carolina State and fullbacks Ed-
lie Ray of LSU, Don Abbey of
Penn State and Frank Cranley of
Wyoming.
While Illinois' Bruce Erb and
Texas Western's Dennis Bramlett
are leading centers, one of the
unusual stories in these times of
scholarships and minute scouting
was the walkon bit performed by
previously unlisted candidate Dean
Schuessler, who won the No. 1
pivot berth at Iowa.
Alabama has two offensive line
aces in tackle Alvin Samples and
guard George Bone.
Billboard
The varsity wrestlers have
held their first meeting and are
holding practice three times a
week in the Intramural Build-
ing l hoeitr Sia-_

I

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4 y gl1r p upiui4141U44
Both are extremely impressive State's 6'4", 236 pound tackle Phil
halfbacks destined for major Olsen, brother of the Rams' Mer-
headlines. lin. Michigan end candidate Phil
Southern California's O. J. Simp- Seymour is a cousin of Notre
son, actually a junior college Dame's Jim while Northern Illi-
transfer in disguise with a 9.3 nois halfback Bruce Bray's dad,
yard average from San Francisco Eddie, starred with Buddy Young
City College, has a 9.5 spring at Illinois.

I

STUDYING GETTINJG YOU DOWN?

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. ..Relax To Your Favorite Music !

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(7
2 s-
1'0
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NEG. U.SPAT OFF. & CAMAOA " MAOE WAU. IA
SHOE --
of,

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ticipating in the sport should
contact coach Cliff Keen at the
Athletic Building, State and
Hoover.
There will be a mass meeting
of the LaCrosse Club tonight at
8 p.m. in the Bus. Ad. Building.
For more information call Hush
Riddleberger at 761-6281.

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KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
0 NO WAITING
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U-M JUDO
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announces
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(Record Racks, Record Covers, Needles)
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