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September 14, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-14

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PAGE TWO.:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTlrRI"A V 7 i ITT VM'.uA, 1 t,&P

T H E I H I3I ..I V

l M U JM .-I1A , , r T I LD 14-1967~f2~'

r

music cinema
Copland-Bernstein-PhilharmonicCinema Guild's New Cinema'

I

COMING
SEPT. 20th

NATIONAL " ., 'F-AL CORPP"A- 1-14
FOX EASTERN TESLATRES
375 FOH VILURGE
pNo. MAPLE R D. " 769-1300

Fisrt Tirne
of
Populor Pries

Score on 'Inscape'

Premiere

Le- ads Film Festival Emphasis

PROGRAM
Overlude to "Candide" ........
Leonard Bernstein
Symphony No. 8 in F major,
Op. 93 .. Ludwig van Beethoven
Inscape .:....... Aaron Copland
Symphony No. 2, C minor, Op.
17 .......... P. J. Tchaikovsky
By MICHAEL BEEBIE
SRO at Hill Auditorium last
night . . . Leonard Bernstein con-
ducting the New York Philhar-
monic in a world premiere of
Aaron Copland's "Inscape"
an excellent concert . .. .opland
was even in the audience.
Copland's excellent use of in-
strumental combinations to ex-
tract original and interesting tone
colors (e.g., the brassscoring after
the oboe solo at the beginning,
his transition from a short trum-
pet solo to an oboe solo, to a
clarinet solo, to a violin solo near
the end of the piece) was in keep-
ing with his earlier works. His
original and effective use of small
quasi-climaxes to lead up to the
main climax before the return
to the original dynamic level was
also a familiar touch.

I was a bit puzzled, however, by
the repetitious use of percussion
rhythms, especially the repeated
cymbal crashes to accent the rhy-
thm of the violin melody ... I'd
like to hear it again.
"Inscape'° is a piece which pre-
sents sounds to the listener in a
fashion that he can understand
not in a complex, almost unplay-
able fashion whose sounds occur
too rapidly and in too great a pro-
fusion to be. collated at. one hear-
ing
"Overture to Candide'," which
opened the program, was an ex-
citing piece and could hardly
fail to interest the audience with
its many contrasting sections fol-
lowing one after 'the other in a
natural almost transition-less'
manner.
i
Beethoven's "Eighth Symphony" '
was given a very musical perform-
ance : the violin section's tone
quality is such that the legato
and espressivo passages were very
effective and their tone had the
needed depth for romantic music.
The contrast between the violin
section's melody passages "and the
accompaniment passages was not
effective. In the fourth move-

ment, however, tl
were in very good
Tchaikovsky's
2" is a perfect pi(
cert because of
which dominate
especially the last
The reed section
competence in
Stanley Drucker,
inetist, should be
mended.
Senate
Seriou

he dynamic levels By CHARLES HOWELL showings is 'the "New Cinema Pro-
t control. In the past few years, gram," which is being screened
"Symphony No. ,Guild has been moving towards Cinema this weekend and next weekend.
a
ece to end a con- "New Cinema" is the name
the light nature schedule with more and more r
's the work - festivals and weekends which fea- 71ven to a series of short films
,t two movements. ture one director or one special- F (from four to thirty minutes long)
i performed with ized field of cinema. which have been assembled by the
°nterprising film distributor, Ja-
this work and This semester, half of the films nus Films. Each of the two pro-
the first clay- on the schedule are part of some grams last two hours. Program
e especially com- festival or series. Perhaps the most One will be shown this weekend
' unique of this semester's special and Program Two next weekend.
The exciting thing about these
. programs is that they give the
ifivestigation Reveals viewer chance to see, in one sit-
tang, a group of films it would, nor-
j mally take months of viewing (as
s Shortage of P ilots fore-runners to feature films) to
see.

Across ,i ti
M

Sydney Hodkinson, a young
Canadian composer who is a stu-
dent in the Music School, recently
won two second prizes in interna-
tional composition contests. His
award-winning . pieces are "Cari-
catures," ' "Five Paintings for
Symphony Orchestra," and "In-
terplay." a quartet.
Music of the 17th and 18th cen-
turies will be featured by the Uni-
versity String Orchestra at its
concert Friday, Sept. 15 at 8:30
p.m. In Rackham Lecture Hall.
The concert is free to the public..
Gilbert M a u r i c e Sauvage,
Frenc4 economist and educator,
will give 'a public lecture on
"Europe and the Common Market"

Dr. Sauvage is the Danforth
Visiting Lecturer.
T h r e e. University professors
were saluted this week by fellow
faculty members for outstanding
teaching and student counseling.
Prof. Roy C. Cowen Jr. of the
German department received the
first $1,000 Williams Award for
distinguished teaching in the hu-
manities. Prof. Alvin I. Goldman
of the philosophy department and
Prof. Robert H. Paslick of the
German 'department received the
first two $500 Ruth M. Sinclair
awards for service to honors stu-
dents and underclassmen.
The awards were presented by
Dean William Haber of the liter-
ary college at the last meeting of
the college faculty.

WASHINGTON OP) - The Air r
Force, Navy, Army and Marines o
fall have a shortage of pilots-- a
' nearly 17,000 in all-and the de- a
ficit will continue well into the t
1970s, a Senate Armed Services P
subcommittee reported last' night.
The chief cause is the unexpect-
ed airpower demands of the Viet- f
nam war, said Sen. John Stennis v
(D-Miss), chairman of the group. e
Another cause given was the lure r
of higher paying and more com- r
fortable jobs in commercial avia-
tion.' E
All cockpit requirements at the
battle front have beeen met, Sten- s
nis said, but he added this was t
accomplished by drastic actions v
which should have been unnec-
cessary. f
After Investigation o
The detailed 23-page report was s
made to the parent Armed Services t
Committee after secret testimony
and months of investigation. s
The eight-senator panel said p
statements by some defense wit- 1
neses "failed to face up to the f
facts and were better calculated to 19
obscure than to inform."
"Veiling and masking the facts
and issues has little justification,"
the report said of this testimony, j
adding that it was "directed or ,
counseled-and certainly approved
-by higher authority."
Obscured Facts'
The senators said some of the
classified testimony "obscured the
pilot shortages behind a screen of I
semantic and statistical sleight-
of-hand."
The caustic report listed these
pilot shortages for the current fis-
cal wear which began July 1: Air
Force 9,269; Navy 2,430; Army
4,318; Marine Corps 886.
Part of the shortage' was attri- '
buted to failure to call up trained
I

reserve pilots. The report said,
other causes included "absence o
an adequate wartime surge' cap-
ability, significant increases in at-
trition rates and inadequate pilot
production programs."
No Surplus'
"No one wants our aviation I
forces to come out of this conflict
with a surplus of pilots such as
existed after World War II, the
report said, but added there was
no evidence this would happen
"even if the war in Southeast
Asia should come to an early end."
Stennis said the panel does not
share apparent fear of some Pen-
tagon leaders that too many pilots
will be trained.
"There is a continuing demand

Unrecognized
The short film has an impor-
tant but virtually unrecognized
position in the development of
modern cinema. Most young direc-
tors begin their careers with short
films, and the film included in the
Janus collection are often those
} for which the directors gained
their reputations.
The devotee of Truffaut (who
has made "Jules and Jim," "Shoot
the Pial-io Player" and "400
Blows") can often see his feature
films, but until this weekend prob-
ably has never had a chance to
see "Les Mistons," his celebrated
20 minute short.
a Other short films have been con-
sidered virtually the capsule state-

acteristic of much modern film j
comedy.
The New Cinema program has
been described as a compilation
which is a "virtual textbook of
modern cinema." This is not sur-
prising when one looks at all the
)fferings. Modern developments in
France are represented by Chris --
Marker's "La Jetee" and Jean-
Luc Godard's "All The Boys Are
Called Patrick."
Eastern European cinema is
represented by the films of Roman
Polanski and Valerian Borowczyk.
Films from the United States, Eng-
land, and Canada are also offered.,
The problems to be solved in a
short film are qualitatively as well
as quantitatively different, from
those of a feature film. Somewhat
analogous to the short story vs.
the novel, the short film cannot
involve a complex narrative and
must try to establish a mood or
a simple dramatic situation. Or,
perhaps, the film is simply a ve-
aicle for sketching a new idea in
style. However, the short film must
be E. complete statement, able to
satisfy in a short span of time.
The short film challenges the
viewer to establish new standards
of successful narration, new atti-
tudes towards what makes a good
film.
From adapted-theater (Beck-
ett's "Act Without Words"), to
documentary (one at a party of
Hugh Hefner's), to-animation, the _
"New Cinema Program" reflects
all the excitement of what's hap-
pening today in the movies.
r

r ,.
THE MIRK II t'rRPORATION PREST'
JULIE ANDREWS-MAX I-ON SYDO -RICHARD HARRIS
in TI IE GLORGF; ROY HILL WALT£R MIRIKII ERODLf(T10N or"HAWAII 'PANAVISION COLOR trf NI X?

NOW
SNOWING

NArONAL. GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES
FOH VILLaGE
375 No. MAPLE RD. .769-1300

ONE OF THE OOTSTANDIN6 FILMS OF THE YEARI"
-Detroit Free Press
. k JOSEPH E. LEVIN£ p~.
k F SHIRLEY MacLAINE
ALAN ARKIN
' ROSSANO BRAZZI
MICHAEL CAINE
VITTORIO GASSMAN
r PETER SELLERS
.k ARTHUR COHN.«..,
VITTORIO De SICA's

FEATURE
TIMES:
1:30-3:25-
5:20-7:10-
9:10

Print:lY P tM An f mbiitr Afcttmt Mtau ,
M CQLQi

for pilots in the civilian- sector of ,.u u MW v v rTM^ -
I ment of a whole style. Such is
our national economy' which ,
stretches into the foreseeable fu- Richard Lester's "Running, Jump-
ture," the report said. ing, Standing Still Film," made
Navy leaders have been con- with the Peter Sellers Goon Show
sidering a program under which Troupe. Lester, the maker of both
pilots would be trained for 8 to Beatles movies and "The Knack,"
10 years naval duty and then of-
fered a chance at high-paying air- demonstrates here his hilarious
line positions. jumpout technique which is char-

TONIGHT
of 7 & 9 P.M.

DIAL
8-6416

A

Thursday at 8 p.m.
ness Administration
131.

in the Busi-
Bldg., Room

NOW SHOWING
ONE OF THE MOST GRAPHICALLY EROTIC
FILMS EVER MADE FOR PUBLIC SHOWING!
-PI boy Magazine

I
I
}
I
i

CINEMA II
Presents
SIMONE SIGNORE
YVES MONTANA.
in
The
S/eepi*ng
Car
M urder
H 965 )
"First-rate thriller!"
N.Y. Herald Tribune
FRIDAY.and
,SATURDAY
7 and 9,15 P.M.
Auditorium A
5 0c
Angell Hall

"Delightful film! hearty laughs,
chuckles. , . . Anna Magnani gives
comedy portrayal!"-N.Y. Daily News

44

moray good
a beautiful

3 d and
FINAL WEEK
°An amusing Poo gnant film! It is beautifully
excellent Performance." --- N. Y. Times
up TM
,
1

Dial
5-6294

I

Phone 434-0130
i
64tuvt a 0& CARPENTER RDAD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING,'
. _ w1 .'/1

rom .
e diffe
r

i them akers, of "DEAR JOHN;
went kind of love story.
M
M
oil
Sigma N( Rr.,,!,.sc -

{ SYLVA KOSCINA/VIRNA LISI /ANNA MAGNANII NINO MANFREOI
i ALBERTO SORDI /JEAN SOREL/ CATHERINE SPAAK
1
,Daily, Classified's Get R

SHOW TIMES:
Fri., Scat. 7, 9 &

Mona thru Thurs. 7 9 P.M.
1 1 P.M. Sun. 6, 8, & 10 P.M.

I

4

in Technicolor

1Crlln , ' ' "'
AcademyAward SADYDENNIS
Winner
..'Shows : at Feature starts
1:30 - 4:00 - 6:35 - 9:05' 15 minutes later

TECHNICOM* Shown at 8:15 Only
ALSO...
s
WI JAM
(ASM "
Shown at
10:10 Only
PLUS--
"WAY UP AND WAY OUT"
COLOR CARTOON

iPRESENTS
"1*HE
al?4

REPERTORY
COMPANY

I

CINEMA HILD
PRESENTS:
JANUS FILMS PRESENTS THE ARCTURUS COLLECTION
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK'S PHILHARMONIC HALL
a collection of brilliant short films
by the directors of the GC's (& 701s)

'I; C
Peter

; a as A Qm the buMs
gala ]--,$
Chase ik

611!'' FALL FESTIVAL
3 Exciting oNew Hifs!
Prior to Broadway!

Sjs
F
y L
. 5
A JERRY GERSHWIN-
ELLIOTT KASTNER
Production
f'n-l#sMnn h M l Ir-r r- 1 11 ! 1 1 r'+\""'' n " a n n n A "7'71 A R f11 !" t^t Pl !"' 1!

I

Sept. 19-24, 26-Oct. 1
Ghelderode's
MIQU
iIua
"Superbl
Flamboyantl
Exhuberantl"
-- L. A. Times

Oct. 10. 15, 31 " Nov. 5
The AMERICAN PREMIERE of
Eugene Ionesco's ,
wr g -A%

Oct. 17-22, 24-29
George Kelly's;
T N
SHOUTwOFF
"Absolutely Marvelous
... Helen Mayes is
Magnificent!"
-- Variety

PROGRAM NO. 1

A

Enter Hamlet Fred Mogubgub, U.S.A.
Renaissance Walerian Borowczyk, Poland
Les Mistons '67 Francois Truffaut, France
Running, Jumping, and Standing Still Film
Richard Lester, 'England
Two Castles Bruno Bozzetto, Italy
The Fat and the Lean Roman Polanski, Poland
rnvAsAta infnrriifn nanvc t n1tmh rte nwinnnf Cranrn

The
London
and Paris.
Success!

v1

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