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September 12, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1967

six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1967

DID YOU EVER SPEND A DIME TO TRY & STOP CRIME?
DESTRUCTION .OF OTHER PEOPLE'S PROPERTY IS ROBBERY!
Dishonest destroys-a lie caused 8 million men to die. Read how and j
why. A lecture given at Jackson Prison on "Creator's LAW REGARD-
ING POWER OF HONESTY." 35 cents a copy. Get 5 copies for $1.00
and self-addressed stamped envelope. Address CREATOR LAWS, c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104. The
one thing wrong in the lives of men and the whole WORLD in general,
is trying to do right, or profit by a wrong method, when it is the
method we use that designed the final result. WHO said "you had to
overcome evil by doing good?" Do you believe it- Read this folder and
see what you think!

Purdue:

Image-Seekers

of

Big

Ten

I

'I

ROB SALTZSTEIN
"How many people do you know
who go to Purdue and can both
walk and chew gum at the same
time?" This comment, by a na-
tional magazine two years ago,
riled up the good denizens of East
Lafayette so much that they swore
revenge, bombastically attacking
the magazine for its pungent ed-
itorial work.
The football team, which at the
time of the story had just blasted
number one ranked Notre Dame
25-21, took special heart and
would have won the Big Ten title
if Michigan State had not been
so cruel as to snuff out their Rose
Bowl hopes late in the season.
They hate Michigan State at
Purdue and even more so after
last year when State easily
squashed them in East Lansing
and made a farce out of the Big
SCOUTING
THE BIG TEN

Ten race. Still, Purdue went on
to the Rose Bowl last year, but
only because the jolly green
giants from the North were for-
bidden to go twice in a row by
a conference ruling.
Finest Receivers
This year the Boilermakers are
loaded with 32 returning veterans
and should be especially strong
at the end positions. "We have
the finest receivers at Purdue that
I've ever had," said Mollenkoph,
without even having to pause and
mull over great Purdue ends of
the past.3
And he's right, Purdue does haveI
some spactacular receivers. Jim
Beirne is back again and by the
fourth game this, year be should
a hold every receiving record in
Purdue history. Last year he was
second only to Michigan's Jack
Clancy in the number of passes

grabbed and Clancy was a con-1
sensus All America.I
According to Mollenkoph, Berne4
"Has bee noverlooked by the pro-
fessionals in their pre-season All
America pick because of his sizel
but he has already shown he has
the ability." Since Beirne is 6' 2";
and 192 pounds, one is forced to1
wonder just what is considered as
large in size.i
At the other end spot is Marron1
Griffin, a junior, who logged 2781
minutes as a sophomore las, year
and hauled in 17 passes. At a
scrimmage in Lafayette this Sat-l
urday he snared 5 passes good for1
156 yards and a score.;
Quarterback Weak
But getting the ball to Beirne
and Griffin this fall may be a
bit of a problem. Purdue', most'
vunerable spot is at quarterback'
for slick Bob Greise, last year's'
All America and All everything at'
Purdue, is a casuality of gradu-
ation and now plays in the "NFT-.
Last spring the quarterback
spot looked as though it would go,
to Mike Englebrecht, a junior, who
played all of sixteen minutes be-
hind ace Greise. But Englebrecht
turned up with a sore shoulder at
Saturday's scrimmage and the'
latest word from East Lafayette
is that Purdue will open its season
against Texas A and M with
sophomore Mike Phipps at the
helm.'
As a high schooler at Colum-
bus, Ind., Phipps made a let ofr
noise and accounted for over
3,450 yards with a 53 pe: cent
passing percentage. Last year as
a freshman he riddled Northwes-
tern and Illinois for over 274
yards as he led Purdue's irosh toI
an undefeated season.
Ground Attack
Yet despite Purdue's great re-
ceivers and the potential Phipps
obviously has, the best bet is that
Purdue will gear its attack to a
potentially awesome ground game.
Shed not a tear for Mollenkoph
and his virgin quarterback, heI
has the horses in the backfield
to make a stampede out of the Big
Ten.
Leroy Keyes, a junior, has
been switched from defensive,
halfback to flanker-back on of-
fense and the swift junior, already
a playboy All America at the ten-
der age of 20, last year ian not
only the longest play from scrim-
mage - 35 yards - but also ran
back the longest Purdue inter,
ception in history - 95 yards -
against mighty Notre Dame.
Keyes not only runs the hun-
dred in 9.9, but he passes wellI
from the running back slot and
last year was 3 for 3 in his de-
partment. An All Virginia selec-
tion as a high school quarterback
at Newport News, Keyes will play
both ways again this year against

top teams. His 8.8 yd. average as
an infrequent runner topped Pur-
due last year.
At fullback, Perry Williams re-
turns as a junior and last year
he was Purdue's leading ground
gainer as a sophomore with 689
yards. At the halfback slot Bob
Blatzell, a senior who came on
strong after his fourth game and
is a great blocker, seems ready'to
break loose. Blatzell, however, will
be pushed hard by two outstand-
ing sophomores, one of whom Den-
nis Wirgowski, could be the
largest halfback in the Big Ten
this season. Wirgowski, weighs in
at a solid 218 pounds and his 6-4
frame will be hard to bring down.
Wirgowski is from Bay City,
Mich., and last year he was Pur-
due's most valuable freshman,
catching 12 passes for 232 yards
and three touchdowns in frosh
games.
Sophomore Dan Gatch should
fill in nicely for fullback Williams
when called to do so, last year
he peppered the Wildcat and Illini
freshmen for 109 - up the mid-
dle - yards.
But finding room for Williams.
Keyes, and companyamay not be
easy. Purdue lost all of its of-
fensive line except for depend-
able Bob Sebeck, a guard. Clan-
ton King, a fine defensive lineman
last year will be switched to of-
fense to help fill the gap and
King can generate a great deal of
power. Sophomores will have to
do the rest in an offensive line
that should average 245 pounds.
All of last year's strong defen-
Intrepid Favored
In America Cup
NEWPORT, R.I. (P) - The
world's most prized yachting tro-
phy, the America's Cup, goes up
for grabs today with the United
States' Intrepid a slight favorite
to extend this country's long dom-
ination against an Australian
challenge.
Intrepid, designed by Olin Ste-
phens, specifically for this de-
fense, will be skippered by Bus
Mosbacher of White Plains, N.Y.,
a 46-year-old veteran.
The races will be sailed over a
23.4-mile course seven miles
south-southeast of Brenton Reef
Tower in Rhode Island Sound.
ssi
B illboard
There will be a meeting to-
night at. 7:30 p.m. in the Ath-
letic Administration Building,
State and Hoover, for all fresh-
men interested in track or cross-
Icountry.

sive line returns and if King is
able to play both ways this will
be a Purdue strong point.
The kicking situation at Purdue
is somewhat questionable-Greise
did most of it last year. Halfback
Blatzell will probably do most of
the extra points and field goals
but he lacks experience. A pos-
sible field goal kicker could be
Don Miniuk who walked up to
coach Mollenkoph two weeks ago
and said he would like to "try
out." In Saturday's scrimmage he
booted one over from 45 yards
out. Who will do Purdue's punting
is highly questionable. The longest
punt so far this year in practice
has been 39 yards.
Inexperienced Secondary
Outside of the quarterback po-
sition Purdue's greatest headache
is the defensive secondary which
will start two sophomores and
miss Keyes when he is not playing
in it. Last year Michigan's Dick
Vidmer pummeled it for 208 yards,
even with Keyes in it, but lucKily
for Purdue, Michigan is not on
the Boilermaker schedule this
year.
However, Purdue will still have
to contend with Notre Dame's
Hanratty and Texas A and M's
Heggart early in the season and
they should give it plenty of prac-
tice before Purdue's Big Ten
opener with Ohio State.
If the defensive secondary ',ells,
if Phipps does tolerably well at
quarterback, and if the offensive
line can clear a path, Purdue will
get its measure of revenge against
Michigan State on November 18
and that could ywell be the crucial
game of the Big Ten Year.
First in a series on Big. Ten
schools.

0

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FULLBACK PERRY WILLIAMS lead Purdue in rushing yardage
last year as a sophomore with 689 yards good for 54 points. He
was also the top rushing sophomore in the Big Ten with 500
yards gained in seven contests.

-

SPORTS SHORTS:
Eckert A

djourns KC Meeting

I

I

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By The Associated Press I
NEW YORK -Baseball Com-
sioner William D. Eckert Adjourn-
ed an unprecedented hearing into
the dispute between the Kansas
City Atheltics and owner Charles
0. Finley Monday night after
more than 10 hours of meetings
but with no announcement.
The Player's Association has
filed an unfair labor practices
charge against Finley with the
National Labor Relations Board
and yesterday's hearing was called
by Eckert in an effort to settle
the squabble so that a complete
hearing with witnesses would be
unnecessary.
* * *-
Mathews Injured
DETROIT-The Detroit Tigers
announced yesterday that third
baseman Eddie Mathews likely will
miss two games because of a fall
at his Milwaukee home.
His injuries were diagnosed as a
bruised hip, bruised forehead and
torn ligament in his right thumb.
Doctors said the slugging third
baseman probably would miss two
games with Baltimore, but would
be able to play Friday against
Washington.
Catcher Bill Freehan might miss

11

I

U

today's game with a swollen arm.
He was hit by a pitch in Chicago
during the weekend.
* * C
Cronin Announces
Playoff Drawing
BOSTON - American League
President Joe Cronin announced
Monday a drawing will be held in
New York Thursday to determine
sites and pairings for possible
playoffs in the close pennant race.
Teams to be represented are the
Minnesota Twins, the Boston Red
Sox, the Chicago White Sox and
the Detroit Tigers, currently
bunched at the top of the league.
Any playoffs will start Oct. 2
if the league title is not clinched
by one team within the regular
season.
* * *
Pros Make Cuts;
McDonald Traded
CHICAGO -It was cutgown
day in the National Football
League, but trades made the big
news as the Los Angeles Rams
dealt Tommy McDonald, one of
the all-time great pass receivers,
to Atlanta and Cleveland sent
Vinceo Costello to the New York
Giants.
McDonald, a flanker who ranks
fourth on the all-tine receiving
list with 455 receptions, was given
up for a draft pick.
Costello also went for a draft
choice of the Giants, who are
desperate for help at linebackesr
after losing three to injury in 10
days.
The Rams also traded 250-
pound defensive end Bruce Ander-
son who was injured most of his
rookie year in 1966, to the Giants
for another draft choice.

New York also picked up 6-0,
195-pound defensive safety Dave
Hathcock from Green Bay for
a draft selection and returned
veteran tackle Jim Colvin to Min-
nesota because of a bad knee.
Third-string quarterback Tom
Kennedy was placed on injured
waivers by the Giants with a
separated shoulder and broken
collar bone and the Giants waiv-
ed on defensive back Ted Holman,
linebacker Joe Siesel and defen-
sive tackle Bob Trygstad.
Green Bay reached the 40-
player limit by trading Hathcock
and cutting rookie linemen Leon
Crenshaw and Tom Cichowski.
Dallas dropped offensive guard
Curtis Marker and end Sims
Stokes, its fourth and sixth-round
drafts.
Detroit sliced veteran center
Mike Alford and rookie running
backs Jim Mankins and Pete Tat-
man; Pittsburgh axed veteran
linebacker Gene Breen, Pat Kill-
orn, Tim Powell and Benny
Christiansen; Philadelphiacut
veteran defenseman Jim Kearney
and Dick Absher, and Baltimore,
dropped Bob Baldwin, Rick Kest-
ner and Bruce McLenna.
AFL Standings

0

INTERFRATERNITY COUNCIL
invites

You save more than money
with U.S. Savings Bonds

4

ALL
UNAFFILIATED MEN

"BREAKING IN BURSLEY"
Band Concert 8 p.m.
Music School Lawn
Welcoming Ceremony following concert at Bursley
STREET DANCE,, 9:30p.m.

Buffalo
Miami
Houston
New Y
Boston

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division
W L7
r 1 04
n 0 1
sork 0 1 0
Western Division

T
0
Q

Pct.
1.000
.000
.000
.000
.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500

a

to attend the

Oakland 1 0 0
San Diego 1 0 0
Kansas City 1 0 0
Denver 1 1 0
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 25, Houston 20
San Diego 28, Boston 14
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Buffalo 20, New York 17
Oakland 51, Denver 0

II

MASS

RUSH

f fi,. f- ! r
_ S 1

I

at Bursley . . . Saturday, Sept. 16

II

H

featuring

I

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VALLY WEBER

IHA ADANCE
Sat., Sept. 16, 1 :30-4:30 P.M.
LONG ISLAND
SOUND
ENTER AT GEDDES RD.
OR MARKLEY
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UNION BALLROOA

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