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September 06, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-06

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PAGE TWO*,
r

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 6. 197

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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dance
Dance Impressario Steve Paxton

NCNP Conference
Closes in Harmony

ORGANIZATION NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN- period for new members to be an-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially nounced.
recognized and registered student orga- * * *
nizations only, Forms are available in Concert Dance Organization is hoid-
Rin. 1011 SAB. I ing moderp dance classes every Tues-
* * day at '7:30 p.m., and Thursday at
UniversityeLutheran Chapel plans a8:15 p.m.. in the dance studio of
get acquainted hour for new students Barbour Gym. Classes are held for men
on Wed., Sept. 6. at 9 p.m. There will on Thursdays at '7:30 p.m.
be a student-conducted devotion at 13~

Exemplifies

'Pop

Art' Theatre

By ROBERT SHEFF
It used to be when the All-
American Boy came to town, the
village band turned out and the
backyards smelled of barbeque.
However now you only hear ques-
tions like "Who is Steve Paxton?"
"I s n 't he the All - American
brother of folksinger Tom Pax-
ton?" Well, no. But Paxton is the
most exciting experimentalist to
hit Ann Arbor since the Once
Festivals of experimental theatre.
Paxton, appearing 8:30 tonight
at the Fifth Dimension, with a
company of 40, is an organizer of
the controversial Judson and Sur-
plus Dance groups in New York.
These companies have expanded
the traditional concepts of dance
to include all movement that can
be done in "open" or potential
space.
They have, welcomed the par-
ticipation of many artists and
local people. The'y have opened
theatre . to the everyday world,
and; recently, to the technological,
thanks to E.A.T., a group for Ex-
periments in Art and Technol-
ogy.
Paxton may be remembered by
Ann Arborites from his appearance
with the Judson Dance group at
"Once Again 1965" that was held
on top the Maynard Street park-
ing structure. His event "Desopit"
on that series involved the mys-
terious unraveling of hundreds of
yards of plastic from the back of
a Volkswagen to make a "cocoon"
for the even more perplexing hap-
penings inside the enclosure.
Flares lit up objects and people,
which were left deposited in the
plastic as the cocoon moved slow-
ly away.
His most recent pieces reflect
nothing like an artistic "progres-

sion" for Paxton says that once
he. feels he is becoming tied to
some particular idea or property
re immediately starts something
else.
His pieces for tonight's perform-
ance include "Excerpts from Earth
Interior," "Satisfyin' Lover," and
his recent "The Sizes." All of
these works are "messageful," and
funky in their presentation but
devastating in their effect. His
pieces are motivated by many
ideas of order, among them, game

structure, road maps and satis-
faction.
The entire space of the Dimen-
sion teen nite club will be utilized
by some 40 people, most of whom
are from Ann Arbor. Paxton pre-
fers to use people and materials
from the locale in which his
piece are being performed. He
has cited the accumulation of
hundreds of props by so-called
modern dance groups as one of
their chief problems.

some movement which can be
meaningful, Paxton has welcomed
the participation of professional
dancers, 1 a wy e r s, arcihtects,
housewives and students for to-
night's show. This group has spent
the last week rehearsing in the
woods, at an abandoned school-
house and at the Fifth Dimension.
Today's art, and Steve Paxton's
activity is a fine example, is art
with other people, not just the
solitary creation of the beautiful

(Continued from Page 1)
As Eric Mann, an organizer
from Newark, told the radical
caucus Monday, "Despite the fact
that many of us fought the blacks
tooth and nail, an alliance has
been forced between black and
white radicals. Even though we
thought the Black Caucus was
playing into the hands of racist
SANE types, we have formed an
alliance with black radicals."
Total. unity of the Black Caucus
on the convention floor masked
deep cleaveages within the body.
Carlos Russell continually re-
minded the Black Caucus that,
"W emust maintain a united black
front. Such unity among the

black militants is thought to be
a product of the recent Newark
black power conference.
The two 12 member committees
established Sunday night, replace
all otherorganizations of NCNP
The Steering Committee which
previously directed NCNP had in-
dicated its intention not to man-
age the convention and to a large
extent abided by this decision,
despite frequent criticism.
The change in the organiza-
tional structure of NCNP leaves
the status of the large convention
debt very much in doubt. There
is considerable question as to
whether the old organizational
structure or the new committees
should be held responsible for it.

'p.m. Address is 1511 Washtenaw.
U. of M. Physical Therapy Club is
having a tour of Hospital P.T. Dept.
on Sept. 6 at 7:30 p.m. Meet in the
main lobby of University Hospital.
Michifish-old members-practice per-
iod, wed., Sept. 6, at 7:30 p.m. Practice

Baha'i Student Group plans informal
discussion Fri., Sept. 8, at 8 p.m. at
520 Ashley. Call 662-3548 if you need
transportation.

vietnam Summer
Thurs., Sept. 7, ate
Hall, Aud. A.

Mass Meeting on
8 p.m. at Angeil

The year's No. 1 best seller picks you

Because anyone is capable of I object.

TON IGHT
STEVE PAXTON
AN EVENING OF EXPERIMENTAL DANCE THEATER
5th DIMENSION
216 W. Huron
8:30

The year's No. l best seller picks you
up and never lets you down!
a

0

Starii
AcadeyAardYENNIS
Winner

t ,j

I

i m ...

NOW
SHOWING

NATIONAL eENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THATE OPEN DAILY 1:00 P.M.
FOXVELLBGEFeature Times: 1:20-
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769-1300 3:10-4:55-6:40-8:30-10:20

Shows at 1 :22-
4:00-6:32-9:05

MICH IGAN

Feature at 1:45-
4:20.6:55-9:25

I

'U

From the
hilarious
success
that
cracked up
Broadway!

I

I

STEVE PAXTON'S "Nine Evenings of Art and Technology" was one of two theatrical events pre-
sented at the New York Armory earlier this year. Paxton, an innovator in the art of the dance, is
appearing at the Fifth Dimension with a compan y of 40 tonight.

cinema
Chicago's Clark Theatre Offers
Unique Experiment in Cinema

By RICHARD AYERS
"Let's go to a movie tonight."
"Right. I'll meet you at the Clark
at midnight." The, Clark. Theatre
is 250 miles away, in Chicago, I.
What does it take to draw num-
bers of Michigan students over
four hours of highway every week-
end? Certainly there are scores
of theatres throughout Michigan
which think of themselves as "art"
theatres. Certainly there are less
exhausting ways of spending an
evening than driving to Chicago.
One of the greatest attractions
of the Clark is precisely its lack
of "art" pretentions. The Clark
Theatre shows two films each
day, 730 different films each year
(732 in leap years). But the clien-
tele is far from the traditional
"art house audience." The thea-
tre's advertisements (which Clark-
ists search out in the Chicago
Tribune, sold in the Union lobby)
are the smallest for Chicago down-
town theatres.
The titles, not the advertising,
are what draws the audience. Over
a two year period, the Clark
Theatre gives definitive coverage
to all major French films, 20
or 30 American stars (usually
run together in a four to, six
day series), the silent comics, doc-
umentary classics, Russian films,
Japanese films, Indian films and
you-name-it.
Then, of course, there's the
atmosphere, the "mood," the soul
of the physical fact of the thea-
tre. It is not classy. It is not
really even comfortable. But the
attraction is the age of the seats,
the dirty rugs, the traditional
marquee a la 1945.
Because it is an inexpensive
theatre, it draws many of the
Loop hoboes, senior citizens and
transients - on - the - make. There

they are. From all walks of life.
From all parts of America. To-
gether in the auditorium. While
the whole history ofrcinema is
displayed before their eyes, from
7:30 a.m. to 4:30 a.m. (21 hours)
each day.
Vince Ferrari, the leading Ann
Arbor proselyte for the Clark The-
atre, explains a trip this way:
"We get on the road at sundown.
That's when the "movie" begins
for us. Riding I-94 or Route 12
(depending on our mood) is en-
joyable enough to make the trip
worthwhile. Then we arrive at 11
N. Clark St., just one block from
the Chicago Picasso.
"And we figure it this way: six
dollars for gas with six people in

the car plus 60 cents admission
equals a dollar 60 each for the
evening. To see two films at a
local commercial theatre costs
three dollars.
The history of the building it-
self is a capsule history of Ameri-
can movie houses. The theatre
was built in 1912 and presented
stage plays until the depression
(except during World War I, when
they turned to burlesque). In the
early thirties the theatre "went
dark" and came back in 1933 as
a movie theatre. In the late for-
ties , the Clark Theatre began its
policy of a daily change of sched-

Phone 434-0130
OPEN 7:30 P.M. NOW SHOWING
MGM pesnt
JAMES JULIE
GARNER-ANDREWS
MELVYN JAMES
DOUGLAS-COBURN
ShownO A IYS
at PICTURE
8:25 'The Ame canRE REEASE
Only o Elv)*
ALSO ...
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BESTI"
-N*YPost
Sidney
Poitier ________
Shelley
Winters 4wB II
Shown at N IN
10:30 Only N PANAVISION1
PLUS-

LAST SHOWINGS TONIGHT
"A truly adult love story!
It is a beautiful filmfinely made'"
-Judit eCst.
Si x aII N. Y. Herald tribune
fN
NNER
JO5.P'1 E LtViNE ,,,sts
.~ CHISTIE
em Vow-~ t 111 GAD

I *i

CCJUMBIt PICTURES Presents .
IN A MARTIN MtANULItS PRODUCTION I~ '
NINA WAYNE w EDDIE MAYEHOFF
KEEP FREEDOM
IN YOUR FUTURE WITH
uBONDS

.F f

Thursday
"LOVE & MARRIAGE"

INT

WAN

"FOOTBALL ROYAL"
COLOR CARTOON

'

/"

Today at
:00
'3:00
5:00
9:10
7:05

I

1:

ules.
And that's how it has been
til today.

Iw

1

un'-,

'V

PRESENTS

THE a

REPERTORY
COMPANY

v"

NOW SHOWING

THEY'RE GOING TO STEAL THE CROWN JEWELS?

YOU MUST BE JOKING!

::::
;:::
':s:
:i:c
":;:
:;::
...
":::
:::
::::
::::
:'s:'s
::::
::;:
:::

"The Nation's Finest Company"
INA
6th FALL FESTIVAL
of
3 NEW PRODUCTIONS
_______ _____U

'p.

CINEMA II
PRESENTS
JACK LEMMON
MARILYN MONROE
TONY CURTIS
in
BILLY WILDER'S
SOME
LIKE, IT,
/1 T-,

MICHAELCRAWFORD-OUVER REED
HARRYANDREWS
in
1 1
I~1ECHNICOLOR┬░
"JAMES DONALD
DANIEL MASSE MICHA[L HO OEHlN 6ADI[I.A[I|C ODi JIE JARP

SEPT. 19-24, SEPT. X,-OCT. I
The brilliant Belgian dramatial
Michel de Ghelderode's
-farce to make you ea."

OCT. 10-15, 17-22
The AMERICAN PREMIERE of
Eugene Ionesco's A

OCT. 24-29. OCT 31-NOV.
One of the classic American eomedies
of the Twenties.
by
PuitzerNzePlaywnght
George Kelly

Saceenpay by DICK CLEMENTand IAN LA FRENAIS - From an original story by MICHAEL WINNER
Directed by MICHAELWINNER - Produced by MAURICE FOSTER and BEN ARBEID
A GILDOR SCIMITAR PRODUCTION . A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
Sunday 7, 9:05, 11:10 P.M.
Mon.-Labor Day Only, 6, 8:05, 10:10 P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
A -J.n .mv Aw, nrA N oineS hort

Translated by Donald Watsao

SEPTEMBER 19- NOVEMBER 51

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