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September 03, 1967 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-03

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Seventy-Sixth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS

Problems Face Ford, UA Wand Michigan

Are. Tuthnfns Are FrEE, 4
Truth Wi H Pree 420 MAYNARD ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.

NEwS PHONE: 764-0552

Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily e tpress the individual opinions of sta# writers
or the editors. This iust be noted in all retwIts.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1967

NJGHT EDITOR: DANIEL OKRENT

Residential College Offers
Quality with Personalization

THE RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE began
classes Thursday in the hope that it
will provide the University with a solu-
tion to the problem of size and the im-
personalization and lack of guidance that
accompany it. At the same time it will at-
tempt to offer students a unique educa-
tion that has potential to become second
to none.
The college's curriculum is foreign to
the academic routine of the University.
The fact that most courses taken by
freshmen are pass-fail is, in itself, a
far cry from the present educational.
system. The counseling setup by resi-
dent fellows and the orientation program
have provided possible solutions to in-
creasingly impersonal college relation-
ships.
Unfortunately, the Residential College
does not have a blank check. Adminis-
trative conflicts, faculty supply, and of.
course financing the project-some $11.85
million-are proving inhibiting factors
that could retard or destroy much of the
college's planned future. Added to these
is the growing chorus of critics who are
condemning the Residential College con-
cept.
These patrons of the status quo feel

that the expenditures for the college are
too great for the benefits that may be
reaped. Many feel that there is no need
for a ResidentialCollege because a stu-
dent could essentially receive the same
"treatment" at a smaller school.
THESE CRITICS, however, fail to real-
ize the present student dilemma. Few
high school graduates come to the Uni-
versity because they want to become lost.
The "bigness" of the University has its re-
wards. It draws both cultural and scien-
tific programs that a smaller school could
not attract. The same is true with re-
gard to professors. The student who comes
to the University over a smaller school
usually comes because he feels that any
"Identity crisis" resulting from the
school's size is less important than the
quality and opportunities of educatiorl.
To bring small school relationships in-
to the multiversity has been the dream
of educators ever since universities be-
gai taking on large numbers of students.
Students at this University and forward-
looking educators are looking now to the
Residential College as an answer to the
challenges of mass education.
-JIM HECK

By NEAL BRUSS
A LTHOUGH advertisements, all
year have proclaimed "Ford
has a better idea," it seems that
all the combined ingenuity of
Ford's vast executive force may
not save it from a long and pain-
ful strike. Ford and the UAW
have until Wednesday night to
agree on a contract. If they do
not, Ford, its 154,000 UAW em-
ployesdand thousands whose jobs
depend on full workloads may
have nothing but their ideas,
strike funds and savings for
months.
The UAW announced Friday
that Ford would be its target for
crisis bargaining sessions which
can set contract patterns for other
auto producers. UAW President
Walter P. Reuther and the union's
Ford department led by Ken
Bannon are expected to work for
production workers' salaries and
a guaranteed annual wage. In the
past, analysts expected the UAW
to pressure Ford only when it
wanted an innovation in benefits
rather than pay boosts. But
Reuther now says, "We might
start talking about wages, that's
a good place to start."
Reuther delayed naming Ford
for a day 'while the UAW pres-
sured the Chrysler Corp. to extend
its contract deadline. Chrysler's
refusal stymied the union's at-
tempt at breaking the bargaining
solidarity of the auto companies.
The union said it feared a "con-
spiracy" of auto companies which
might end in a lockout by the two
members of the Big Three not
picked as strike targets.
THE AUTO manufacturers' un-
ity seems far more likely to endure
the year than the union's. If the
UAW was once able to rouse its
full membership to the credo
"Solidarity Forever," its newly
militant skilled tradesmen this
summer became deaf to themes-
sage. The skilled tradesmen
demonstrated against the union,
which some tradesmen feel does
not adequately represent them.
Two weeks ago they picketed
Ford's administration building -
"the glass house" - while the
bargaining team was working in-
side.
Some of the skilled tradesmen
want to withdraw from the UAW
and instead be represented by the
International Society of Skilled
Tradesmen. They feel the UAW is
neglecting ther while seeking
better contracts for unskilled
workers. Skilled tradesmen are in-
furiated by Reuther's preoccupa-
tion with the guaranteed annual
income proposal because they feel
it will deteriorate incentive and
defer' their heavy wage boost de-
mands. The UAW's 200,000 skilled
tradesmen are almost fully em-
ployed throughout the year, un-

0

its small businessmen were ruined
by rioting, and those who weren't
lost days' revenue from closed
stores.
But worst of all, a strike would
close the major artery of money
into the Negro community. Be-
cause of both the availability of
Negro labor and the UAW's anti-
discrimination efforts, inner city
Negroes are heavily employed in
the auto plants. Unskilled ghetto
Negroes are among the first laid
off during slack periods, and a
strike during the usually busy fall
would pauperize them. Metropol-
itan Detroit also faces teacher
strikes which would pinch the
nerves of education, which furnish
ghetto dwellers with skills. Sim-
ultaneous a u t o and teacher
strikes could be a blow of calami-
tous proportions.
THE SHAKY positions of al-
most everyone involved or affect-
ed by the auto barga.ining has
given the talks a strange sense of
calm which almost amounts to
hopelessness. Union officials have
said Ford's defense projects are
not important enough to justify
government intervention in the
bargaining, but, federal concern
may bring in a fresh sense of
urgency.
Still, despite the pressures and
wage package demands, the crisis
sessions do not follow on the heels
of violent labor - managment
battles. As a scrawl on a television
picture tube in the Chrysler bar-
gaining penter proclaimed, the
mood is almost to "Make Love,
Not Deals."

4

The Battleground: A Ford Assembly Plant at Mahwah, N.J.

like their unskilled UAW brothers
who suffer from seasonal layoffs.
Although a Reuther "annual-
wage" victory would further alie-
nate the skilled tradesmen, it
would certainly bolster his pres-
tige among others. Good auto con-
tracts would strengthen Reuther
in his continuing struggle with
AFL - CIO President George
Meany. It would also reaffirm his
position atop his own union, for
Reuther turned 60 the Friday he
named Ford a target, and over 40
per cent of the UAW's 1.5 million
members are under 30.
THE AUTO manufacturers may
be willing to endure a strike-and
the. possible lockouts - only be-
cause their profits would be tor-
pedoed if the nearly six per cent
wage increment was adopted. In
addition to their wage costs, the
producers-face increasing mate-
rials costs and expensive manda-
tory safety modifications imposed
by the federal government.
Even without some imminent
hike in wages, Ford predicts a 40
per cent drop in profits this year
from its $621 million in 1966. Ford
officials predict sales of nine mil-
lion '68 cars, but a strike would
blow that prediction "sky high,"
according to Ford Group vice
president Lee Iacocca.
Ford could have been picked
as the bargaining target by elimi-
nation. Foundering American Mo-
tors and Chrysler could not sur-
vive a strike. The UAW - and
Michigan as well-could not af-
ford a General Motors strike. An-

alysts indicated before the bar-
gaining that one out of every
seven Michigan workers would
eventually miss time on the 'job
if a GM strike were called. And
even the $67 million in the UAW
strike fund would last only nine
weeks if GM were struck. At best
the strike fund would only help
feed UAW families; it could not
begin to compensate for the pul-
verization of the business com-

munity which A strike would
cause.
IF THE BARGAINING combat-
ants seem destined for disaster
as the deadline approaches, they
will drag in Detroit, much of
Michigan and plenty of the nation
as well. Detroit came close to
bankruptcy because of costs and
losses of revenues from its riots.
and it certainly does not need a
season of unemployment. Many of

0

Negroes Cities and Open Housing

WITH THE VIOLENT summer of Ne-
gro rioting in over 50 of the nation's
largest cities as a backdrop, Michigan's
urban centers must come to grips with
demands by their Negro citizens for the
enactment of open housing legislation.
Attorney General Frank Kelley's recent
ruling that cities may enact and enforce
local housing laws means that munici-
pal governments can no longer shirk the
responsibility of. putting themselves on
record in favor of making adequate hous-
ing available to all citizens..
Although most Negroes are rightfully
skeptical of the effectiveness of ordi-
nances which prohibit discrimination in
the sale and rental of housing, many see
the passage of such an ordinance as a
necessary moral supplement to their
cause. They are well aware that even if
city officials lend their support and pres-
tige to efforts to integrate "lilly white"
neighborhoods throughout the state, lit-
tle will be achieved. Such laws can al-
ways be circumvented. However, the de-
feat of such measures can only make
more acute an already troubled situation.
The lack of adequate housing for Ne-
groes due to discrimination in the sub-
urbs, highway construction projects, and
urban renewal within the central city
has led to high population concentra-

tions-an environment ripe for civil dis-,
orders. A strictly enforced open occupan-
cy ordinance will make housing oppor-
tunities more available, no matter how
small. More important, the passage of
housing laws and the establishment of a
vigorous apparatus for their enforcement
may serve to provide a safety valve
through which Negro frustrations could
be released.
UNFORTUNATELY INTEGRATION and
stabilization of racial mixtures , in
neighborhoods such as Northwest Detroit
or East Grand Rapids can only come
gradually, as the Negro standard of liv-
ing rises. Ann Arbor has the strictest
open occupancy law in the nation and it
is enforced where cases of discrimina-
tion are reported. But white neighbor-
hoods in Ann Arbor are priced out of the,
range of the large proportion of Negro
families living in the city.
Municipal governments are not capable
of providing the leadership and resources
for an open housing drive extending overj
many years. If for no other reasons, their
terms of office are limited. But they
must show the Negro community that lo-j
,cal government is morally responsible and
concerned.
-MARK LEVIN

The Combatants: Henry Ford II and Walter Reuther

Mammg~mmeme ..-BARR Y GOL A Tran wwmmsa
.BoRRh OLDWATERr
Fallout WI'th a, Nucle ar T-reaty

t " ! ./
~ .
\1vt

I
t
4

WE SHOULD not ratify the
proposed nuclear nonprolifer-
ation treaty. It is just another
step into a nuclear ambush.
It is not an effective treaty.
Nowhere in it is any provision
for the sort of inspection that is
absolutely essential in making
any nuclear treaty meaningful.
Already, thanks to the nuclear
test ban treaty,kthis country has
stood virtually still in the de-
velopment of the defensive sys-
tems upon which our very lives
ultimately may depend. The
treaty was signed at It time when
the Soviet Union already had
co'nducted the tests which today
permit them an admitted advant-
age in knowledge of large-scale
nuclear effects - the sort that
could be used in building sys-
tems to shield them while per-
mitting them offensive freedom
against us.
THE NEW TREATY is sup-
posed to prevent the spreaduof
nuclear weapons to other nations.
There are a few little catches to
it even in that respect. Red
China, for instance, won't touch
it. And her nuclear power is the

most significant single addition to
the world's problems.
It is in the lack of inspection
that the treaty internally falls
apart. There is no way under the
whistle on the Soviets now, to take
treaty for any nation to blow the
just one of many possible exam-
ples, shipping nuclear materials to
Cuba or to Red China-or to blow
the whistle on Red China, in
turn, for shipping nuclear mate-
rials anywhere else.
More serious, perhaps, than
these technical defects is its psy-
chological, possiblyfatal defect.
It is to be expected that Lyndon
Johnson will exploit the treaty
proposal as a giant step forward
in easing world tension. He will
milk every ounce of political
melodrama out of it. There will
be every attempt made to make
this treaty appear as a true mile-
stone toward peace.
WE CAN E:KPECT the sum
total, of this political hay-mak-
ing to be another period of bliss-
ful apathy in regard to nuclear
weaponry.
This, of course, will suit the
plans of Robert Strange McNa-
mara to a tee. As the nation's

chief advocate of one-sided dis-
armament, the so-called secretary
of defense, will be able to use the
nonproliferation treaty as a pa-
cifier with which to soothe any.
one who brings up embarrassing
questions regarding our nuclear
situation.
The truth of that situation is
worthy of the most intense na-
tional debate, the most thorough
congressional probe and the most
sincere examination of the public
conscience. _
TO THE BEST of my knowl-
edge, and on the basis of what
seems to me an overwhelming
accumulation of evidence, our
nuclear position is very bad -
compared to what it was before
McNamara began his disarnia-
ment efforts. Soviet nuclear pow-
er, on the other hand, has had
every possible opportunity to
grow to what should be alarming
levels.,
It is this increasing imbalance
in nuclear strength that now
should occupy us - not another
meaningless, worthless and mis-
leading treaty.
Copyright, 1967, Los Angeles Times

a

Plight of a Married Student

IT IS AMAZING how many different
ways the University can find to shroud
almost any campus issue in misintepre-
tation, misinformation and misadminis-
tration. The current controversy over in-
creased rents for married student hous-
ing has gotten so tangled up in all three
that nobody is really sure any more just
what anybody involved wants.
It all started on August 1 when Di-
rector of University Housing John Feld-
kamp sent letters to residents of North-
wood and University Terrace informing
them that their rent had been raised by
$10 a month. Since most of them had al-
ready signed contracts, and since they
were required to give the University 60
days warning before. terminating their
leases-such a time being much too late
to find private housing anyway-most of
the residents were understandably an-
noyed.
Over 200 of them were, upset enough
to sign a petition threatening a rent
strike unless the increase was delayed
until January 1. Graduate Assembly got
into the act by ~passing a resolution op-
posing the rent hike, supporting with-
holding the amount of money by which
The Daily is a Member of the Associated Press and
Collegiate Press Service.
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rents were increased, and calling for "an
open and democratic referendum" on
what "supplemental services and/or fa-
cilities" were to be paid for by the in-
crease in fees. The GA also urged the
housing administration and the Regents
to delay the implementation of the new
rates until January.
MEANWHILE, STUDENTS from the Stu-
dent Advisory Committee on Hous-
ing meeting with Feldkamp .could come
up with no alternatives to the increase.
Feldkamp proposed a compromise in the
form of an October 1 instead of Septem-
ber 1 starting date for the new rates,
but this was categorically refused by GA
and representative residents.
Then they consulted among themselves,
they decided the compromise was a fair
one, and brought the good news to Feld-
kamp. But the latter, while meeting with
other University housing officials, was
told that they would not accept his com-
promise. The students accused Feldkamp
of bad faith, and tempers got shorter.
NOW RESIDENTS are being asked to
withhold the rent increase for the
month of September, as their leaders
work to have the new rates begin in Oc-
tober.
In the meantime, it seems likely the
whole issue will fizzle out, because while
GA President Roy Ashmall and a few con-

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