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September 03, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-03

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PAGE. TWO -

TGIF! Mleuir- Alw n A l v

"'G TW Ui.I1[ iI fl'tXlw A . t 3iLYK

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER

AT YIH FORUM:
Joker's' Crown Jewel Theft
Relies on Overdone Stereotype

Satchmo: Sending It
BaCk to the Old Days

KEEPING OUT REFUGEES:
Hong Kong-China Border Shut
As Battles Continue in Canton

By FRED BOOKSTEIN
Much great literature inquires
piercingly into the criminal mind,
illuminating dai'k crannies of an-
tisocial: libido and spurring re-
spectable citizens to check their
sons' and. daughters' beds and
minds: "Crime and Punishment,"
"The Stranger," "In Cold Blood,"
"Itey Largo."
"The Jokers," currently at the
Vth Forum, a recent British at-
tempt at serious farce, is not of
this genre. It shines a new and-
unneccessary light into the mind
of that most exploitable, of- all
s. t e r e o.t yp e s, the Effervescent
Young Man (E. Y. M.), played by
Michael Crawford, whom the elder
among you may recall as the same
character in "The Knack."-.
Our-E. Y. M., booted out, of the
army .for cheating in war games,
,wants revenge. Well, he doesn't
want revenge, exactly. He simply
wants the world to~ accept him on,
his own terms, poor lad, So he and
his brother steal the crown: jewels,
and then the E. -Y. M: tkkes sole
possession by' hiding them by
Stonehenge and then, having
demonstrated his superiority to
Scotland Yard and to the ordinary
laws of acting, he meekly returns
them to an anonymous populace.
E. Y. M. is therefore a nice guy
after all. He is also completely un-
interesting.
The central attraction of a tale
of larceny is the larceny, of course.
In this regard, "The Jokers" is
perhaps adequate. The scenario,
though it makes up in gag lines
("Where did you get that laser?'
Rent-a-Laser?" Yuk.) and ghastly
James Bond technique (lasers In-
deed!) for- what merits it might
legitimately sport (fast cuts, in
particular, being less confusing in
this film than they usually are),
still manages. to give the viewer
a tingling antisocial thrill when
the jewels are caught and cached.
Thy sensation is vaguely- like
that promised by books titled "Sex
Without Guilt": according to the
sociological notions of conscience,
there ain't any; but there is any-

way when you're watching other
people do it.
Aside from that, the movie is
distressingly precious and unfun-
ny. It stumbles more clumsily over
characters: they. are too well-
defined., E. Y. M.'s brother, a half-
wittingaccomplice in the theft is
left, skeletal by the -scriptwriters.
We are told in one thrown-away
Lead er Notes
Riot Threat
(Continued from Page 1)
"but the committee still has a big
job to do."
In the area of education, the
NAACP is particularly concerned
about racial inbalance- in the
Mack Elementary School. It plans
to meet with the parents of the
school children and determine
their 'feelings. It also plans to
study the program at Jones School
before recommending!definite pol-
icies.
"A good many people," says Mrs.
Wheeler, "regard the NAACP as
a noderate middle class organiza-
tion." Mrs. Wheeler attributes this
to the fact that "to a large extent
the NAACP, in seeking to help all
Negroes by working through the
courts, has inadvertently opened
the doors for a few well-educated,
well-trained Negro people. "The
masses have suffered and they
look to another kind of leader-
ship."
She contended, however, that
"this has not been true in Ann
Arbor." The Ann Arbor chapter
has 300 members-a small per-
centage of the city's Negro popula-
tion-and about a third of the or-
ganization's membership is white.
But its support "comes more from
the percentage ofdNegroes that
suffers the most deprivation.
"In -seeking to improve condi-
tions, we find that we have little
or no help from the Negro middle
class. 'They are, as much of a
drawback as white bigots," , she
said.

S
C.
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r
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line (the sound track of this pic-
ture is remarkably ambiguous)
that he is an unsuccessful in-
terior decorator; thereafter we as-
sume he is in this. business for
the free publicity and forget about
his motivation.
Not so, alas, the E. Y. M. We
watch him. wanly' sarcast his par-
ents, his friends. We would read
in the script that he is a con-
summate liar, though the acting
is not too clear on this point. He
is flattened by a 'fat dossier of
EYMish behavior which rapidly
ceases to make us feel E along
with him.
The theft is pulled off, he not
unexpectedly doublecrosses his
brother.. At this point the viewer
ought to leave the theatre. What
remains is a repetition of the
prologue, but unbuoyed by ex-
pectation, unjustified by plot
(which collapses into mindless
slapstick) or humor (which weak-
ens equally; laughter is release
of tension, and after therheist
there's no more tension to speak
of). "Topkapi," one recalls, ended
just about five 'minutes after the
audience let' go its breath; "The
Jokers" drags for eighteen hun-
dred empty seconds.

(Continued from Page 1)
'love you for it. The whole min-
strel show-Eddie Cantor-vaudeville
business.was absolutely too much.
It was Louis Armstrong who must
have taught The Shadow every-j
thing he knows about clouding
people's minds. And you loved him
for it.
And you loved him for bring-
ing all these different types of
people into the Hill audience, some
undoubtedly for the first time.
You saw the milkman, the for-
eign student (both American and
foreign), the new grad student,
the custodian and a whole bunch
of wonderful people who you know
must have danced to the Glenn
Miller band when it stopped for a
one night stand in Ann Arbor.

"Misty" but I thing that they
knew it and justified it on the
grounds of being different and,
therefore, ,good. But that's where
they made their, big mistake. The
smallgroup tunes never made it.
The bass player, Buddy Catlett
(any relation to Big Sid? . . No.)
was the most modern in his solo of
"Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams
and Dream your Troubles Away."
He stays very "in" and straight
but he stretches out a little bit
more than the rest. He gets up
there and his intonation is good
and so his tone despite a seeming-
ly weak instrument and all-gut
strings.
The night's flaw-Jewel Brown,
female vocalist. God knows why
she's been travelling with Arm-

Arabs Agree t
Sen

Tyree Glenn, who plays trom- strong for six and one-half years.
bone and vibes (why the electric She tries to sing like a jazz vocal-
cord if he didn't use the vibra- ist but couldn't even substitute
to?)' is the Kingfish image of for the worst Vandella of Martha.
the group. "That's My Desire" was This whole affected business with
just that. Tyree clowned around the hands and looks and smile is
and played with his fluffy chap- ridiculous. Not only does it not
eau and stole the show (with. his mnake sense with the Armstrong
fluffy chapeau. His trombone did quartet, it justtis bad. The girl
all those Dixieland things and on shouldn't be up there.
"Volare" he whipped out his plun- She clearly h rs a chip on her
ger and waa-waad us to pieces, shoulder and it shows, honey, it
He meant it but don't forget that shows. The outfit that she switch-
Roswell Rudd means it too. The ed into for the second half was
vibes business, though, was kinda borrowed from the Groom and
silly. "TLove. Paris" was very Clean mermaid. But I'm not really
that down on you, Jewel. I just
R se hope that you sing with a little
0 R esum e O il bit more honesty and 'warmth in
the future. You have a nice little
.*" voice and 'I don't really think that
you have to use all that dopey
stuff. Maybe you do.
Louis Armstrong is the only guy
however, will be governed by in the world who is capable of'
three principles-non-recognition getting an almost packed house!
of Israel, no conciliation and no to clap accurately on two and
negotiation. four. He got some heads moving
The summit , was a victory for and feet tapping that I'm sure,
the moderates among the Arab haven't moved in a long, long
leaders and Egypt's President 'while. If a kid and his parents are
Gamal Abdel Nasser contributed having hassles about generation
much to their success. things and the kid says "you just
The $256 million Nasser is don't understand" (which is us-
promised from the new develop- ually true), but he wants the'
ment, fund will go a long way to- argument to end on a positive
ward offsetting loss of revenue side, then he should go with his!
from the waterway. parents to see Louis Armstrong.

HONG KONG G.P)-The British
began rolling out a' coiled barbed
wire fence along 10 miles of its
border with Red China yesterday
as a safeguard against the pos-
sibility of a flood of refugees from
Red China's Kwangtung province
whei'e bloody fighting has been
reported.
British colonial leaders express-
ed fear that a heavy influx of"
refugees, untrained and unskilled,
could swamp Hong Kong's econ-
omy.
Various reports from inside Red
China say a sharp struggle con-
tinues in Canton about 60 miles
northeast of Hong Kong's border,
between supporters of Communist
Party Chairman Mao Tse-tung,
and his opponents.
Rail Traffic Halted
Rail traffic from Canton to the
border was halted yesterday. This,
plus a Radio Moscow broadcast
stating that fighting continued,
cast doubt on claims by Maoists
that they had seized control of
Canton. The Moscow broadcast
quoted eyewitnesses in Kwang-
tung' province.
There washowever, no inde-
pendent confirmation of the re-
ports.
The barbed wire barracade is
going up between a few hundred
yards and.a half mile behind the
actual border fence itself. It is
designed as a secondary line of
defense.
The fence was being set up de-
spite the fact that colonial offi-
cials said they had no confirma-
tion of reports that 30,000 to
70,000 Chinese were poised in
Kwangtung for flight to Hong
Kong.
The building of the fence itself,
however, shows that the govern-
ment has not forgotten its refugee
crisis of 1962. when 200,000 Chi-
nese flooded into the colony.

THEY GOT A MURDER ON THEIR HANDS.
THEY DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITh IT.

#1

Hong Kong faced then what it
would face now if there should
be a mass exodus of Chinese into
Hong Kong. The colony is working
to house, clothe, feed and find
jobs for the nearly two million
Chinese refugees that have arrived
since the Communists took China
in 1949.
Refugees Not Stopped
Officials expressed hope that
the, mere presence of the new
fence will act as a deterrent.
In 1962, Communist Chinese
officials made no attempt to stop
the refugees.
This year, however, all signs
along the tense border indicate
that the Communists are-at least
as of this' moment - preventing
refugee escape from China.

The Radio Moscow broadcast,
monitored in Tokyo, said eyewit-
nesses in Canton reported that a
few Maoists managed to seize the
Canton radio for a brief time
'Thursday and broadcast a claim
they had seized the city.
Widespread Clashes
Moscow said the reports it had
received described the clashes
around Canton as widespread and
bloody with estimates of 1,000
persons having been killed.
Radio Moscow said trouble had
also broken out in the industrial
city of Chengchou, capital of
Honan province, about 500 miles
south of Peking. It reported fresh
clashes had started Friday and
said production there had been
hard hit b the unrest.

JAW Refuses Contract
Without Higher Pensions

DETROIT (P) 'United Auto
Workers President Walter P. Reu-
ther put the Big Three automakers
on notice yesterday that there will
be no agreement on a new con-
tract unless it includes higher pen-
sions and an escalator clause gear-
ing pension payments to the cost
of living.
Reuther said both future re-,
tirees and those already on pen-
sions must be included, and he
rejected as inadequate offers by
Ford, General Motors and Chrys-
ler to increase by $1 the basic pen-
sion rate for future retirees only.
The union chief emerged from
yesterday's negotiating session
with Ford Motor Co., which is the
union target for a contract or
strike by Wednesday midnight,
and said little progress had been
achieved. Malcolm L. Denise, Ford
vice president for labor relations,
agreed.
Contracts Expire Wednesday
They said, there likely will be
bargaining meetings today and
tomorrow-as the union drives for
a settlement at Ford that would.
be the pattern for" the industry.
Four days remain before current
contracts expire.
Talks~ gat General Motors: And
Chrysler were recessed yesterday
until Tuesday.1
Since 1948, wages have been tied
to the .government's cost, of living
index and move a penny an hour
for each .4 change in the index
each three- months. If the Index
falls, wages drop. If it shows 'an,
increase, wages rise.
Since current contracts were
negotiated three years ago, wages
have increased 18 cents per hour

because of increases in the index.
The ension escalator would go
up or down likewise, Reuther said.
"If it makes sense to protect
workers on the payroll on full pay
against erosion caused by an in-
crease in the cost of living," Reu-
ther said, "it makes a great deal
more sense to protect the retiree."
Canadian Workers
Ford has 27,000 on its pension
rolls and its pension fund stood
at $553 million last Dec. 31. Before
Reuther raised the issue of tying
pensions to the cost of living, the
union had made win-or-else de-
mands for a substantial wage in-
crease for all, something addition-
al for skilled workers, guaranteed
annual income and equal pay for
its Canadian and American work-
ers.
Denise told a news conference
that Ford does "not propose to
negotiate Canadian wages as such"
at U.S. bargaining tables, but
Reuther asserted that the union
has "a perfect legal right" to ne-
gotiate the issue in the United
States.
If Canadian' wages are less than
U.S. wages, U.S. workers' jobs are
unprotected, he said, adding:.
"That is a matter to be ;:settled
here."

KHARTOUM, Sudan (P) - The
decision of the Arab summit
meeting to resume oil shipments
to the West was made as a bid to
win western sympathy and sup-
port for the.Arab nations in their
efforts to wipe out Israel's gains]
in the Middle East war June 5-;10,
delegates reported yesterday.
The conference wound up Fri-
day.. The delegation of Kuwait-1
a major oil producer - departed
yesterday predicting that oil will
start flowing almost immediately
from Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Iraq
and Libya to the United. States,;
Britain and West Germany. The
Arabs had accused those countries
~in siding with Israel in the wvar.
In surprisingly conciliatory de-
cisions, the summit rejected pro-
posals put to a meeting of Arab;
finance, economy and petroleum
ministers in Baghdad last month
for a complete-halt to oil supplies
to the West for three months fol-
lowed by a permanent ban on sup-
plies to the United States, Britain
and West Germany.
Oil as Positive Weapon
"The summit conference real-
ized that the flow of oil could be
used as a positive weapon which'
could be directed toward the con-
solidation of the economies of the
Arab nations that suffered di-
rectly from the Israeli aggression
and help them in facing the pres-I
sures of battles," the resolution
declared..
"The summit conference has
therefore decided on the resump-
tion of the flow of oil."
The decision also enabled the
oil-rich states to contribute gen-
erously to a $392 million develop-
ment fund from which Egypt will
draw $256 million and Jordan
$122 million.
Moderation was the keynote of
the summit resolutions with mili-
tary action to regain occupied
Arab territories apparently having
been abandoned.
Eliminate Aggression
Instead the Arab leaders agreed-
on "joint political and diplomatic
action at the international, level
to eliminate the traces of aggres-
$ion." Their political maneuvers,

The year' No0. 1 best seller picks you
up and never lets you down!
east;

Phone 434-0130
w oft nCARPENTERORAD
OPEN 7:30 P.M.
NOW SHOWING
LEE MARVIN-ERNEST BORGNINE
Shown at 8:30 & 1:10
METROC O t
Also-Shown at ll:30Only
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Matinee showings are NOT continuous!
will be sold prior to show times. No one
admitted after the feotu're has started.

THE MIRLSCH '"I YPOTE
CORPORATIONPusn EY PITIER ROD STEIR
ITHE NORMAN JEWISON-WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
~IN 7 W ATU OF IENI G HT"
ci starmig Srepa yS IL
WARREN OATES tEE GRANT - SreenpaybySIL SILLIPHAN ,
PioducedbyWALER MIRISCH 'DoectedbyNORMAN JEWISON NITED
MUSIC - QUINCY JONES IN THE HEAT Of THE NIGHT sung by RAY CHARLES S
,COLOR by DeLoxe A"':.Olt",r
SUNDAY ONLY'

Tickets
will be

I

I

After each performance, the theatre WILL BE
CLEARED' Shows are at 1:00-3:00-5:10-7:15-
9:20.

Starring t r
Academy A N li DENN/
Winner

NEXT
SINATRA: "THE
NAKED RUNNER" k k

Dial
NO
2-6264

l

/

Plus-"DUCK FEVER"
COLOR CARTOON

Shows at 1:30-
4:00-6:30-9:05

__

MICHIGAN

4:15-6:55-9:20
Feature at 1 :45-

NOW SHOWING

...

THEY'RE GOING TO STEAL THE CROWN JEWELS?

_... _

rU l

k

GILD
SATURDAY-SUNDAY
Point of
'Orde ry
Brilliantly edited !
The Army=McCarthy

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER PRESENTS
sTEVE PAXTON
in
AN EVENING OF EXPERIMENTAL DANCE THEATER
of the
5th DIMENSION
'216 W. Huron
Wednes4ay,.Sept. 6-8:30
TICKETS $1.50-available at:
DISCOUNT RECORDS CENTICORE BOOKSHOP
PLASTER OF PARIS THE PRINT SHOP
and at the door
A truly adult love story!
It is a beautiful filmfiuely made!:
-Judith Crist. j ::.
Sigm~a iI. Y. Herald Trbun
presents_
WINNER
IQACADEMY. i
.. sla n . ~ i a :

YOU MUST BE JOXING!

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W 1%, wt. 2i.0. t

MICHAEL CRAWFORD-"OLIVER REED
HARRYANDREWS
in
A ACHN ICOLDRĀ°
v"1AMES DONALD
DANIEL MASS[Yt MICRA[LI HOFIERN " 6ABHIEltA LICUW 111 iiETARP

PRESENTS
THE a REPERTORY
COMPANY
"The Nation's Finest Company"
INA
6th FALL FESTIVAL
OfU
3 NEW PRODUCTIONS

hi

OCT. 2449, OCT 314JOV. S

Wp

Screenplay by DICK CLEMENTand IAN LA FRENAIS+ From an orignal story by MICHAEL WINNER
Directed by MICHAELWINNER - Produced by MAURICE FOSTER and BEN ARBEID
A GILDOR-SCIMITAR PRODUCTION - A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
Sunday 7, 9:05, 11:10 P.M.
Man.-Labor Day Only, 6, 8:05, 10:10 P.M.
Tues.-Thurs. 7, 9:05 P.M.
Ay Also
Academy Award Nominee Short

II

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