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September 02, 1967 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-02

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EIGHTJ

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SArt* DAY. SEP'u'mBIsR 2. 1967

EIGHT THE MICHH~AN DAiLY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2,1967

'UBLIC AROUSED:
National Guard Withdraws Bid
For Riot Training in Lansing

State Schools Delay Opening;
Teacher Salary Talks Continue

PHOTOGRAPH ERS
TO WORK FOR THE DAILY

LANSING (M-Retreating before
a wave of public criticism, the
Michigan National Guard has
withdrawn its request to hold riot
control training in Lansing.
State Adjutant General CJar-
ence C. Schnipke said Thursday
he had asked Mayor Max Murn-
ingham to withdraw the Guard
request to use an eight-block
strip of condemned buildings to
conduct mock riots Sept. 24-25.
The Guard proposal had drawn
fire from the Lansing Human Re-
lations Committee, the State Civ-
il Rights Commission, a repre-
sentative of the Southern Chris-
tian Leadership Conference, city
councilmen and a legislator.
Troublemakers
The Human Relations Commit-
tee unanimously voted Wednes-
day to recommend the Guard re-
quest on grounds the training
could increase community tension
and attract outside troublemakers.
"We don't want to be a part
of causing a riot because we want
to carry out riot training," Schnip-
ke said; adding that an alterna-
tive training site would be found.
He described the cancellation of
the four-hour day and four-hour
night training in which Guards-
men, local police and firemen
were to take part as "an irre-
trievable loss in disaster plan-
ning."
Schnipke indicated the Lansing
situation could influence decisions
in other cities where local Guard
units are seeking permission to
conduct training compliance with
a Defense Department directive.
He said he had not heard from
any other Guard units.
Special Training
The Defense Department, on re-
quest of President Johnson, has
ordered the Guard in each state
to complete a special training pro-
gram in civil disturbance and riot
control by Sept. 30.
The mock riots had been plan-
ned to wind up the training de-
signed to produce "units capable
of functioning as a team in full
coordination with police, fire and
civil authority," Schnipke saiud.
He said the Lansing units would
train "as soon as we can think
of some place to do it," adding
that property owned by Michigan
State University and the Ingham
County fairgrounds were among
sites being considered.
Lack of an urban environment
would decrease the effectiveness
of the .training and offer little op-
portunity for coordination with

municipal police and fire depart-
ments, Schnipke said.
"What we're concerned with is
sniper control," he said. "How do
you isolate a sniper; get to the
building and get him out."
Schnipke said the exercises
could be conducted in the arm-
ory backyard, but asked:
"How do you get a realistic
Situation in the backyard? How
do you isolate a sniper on a flat
parade ground?"
Camp Grayling or Fort Custer
could be considered as training
sites as a last resort, he said.
"We're trying to correct mis-

takes made in Detroit," Schnipke
said.
The Guard drew criticism from
the Defense Department for the
conduct of its operations during
the Detroit riots in July.
The general said he felt the riot
training proposal had been mis-
understood, adding that "there
was a misapprehension that we
were going to come up town with
loaded weapons."
The proposed training site lies
a few blocks from the Capital in
an area purchased by the State
Highway Department for construc-
tion of an extension of I-496.

Black Separatism Clouds
New Politics Conference

(Continued from Page 1) -
"I've got six black children and
I'll fight to the end before I
let this country take 36 years
from them."
Adding fuel to the smoldering
black separatism fire, CORE head
Floyd McKissick told the after-
noon session that "black people
must be their own platforms, not
a plank in somebody else's.
'We must achieve certain things
ourselves. One of these is our free-
dom. A liberation struggle con-
tinues, although we urge your
support."
The black caucus, which in-
cludes most of the Negro delegates
who came to the NCNP, continu-
ed to meet separately from the
rest of the convention. It has not
yet issued any kind of formal
policy statement about its inten-
tions.
One Oregon Negro told me, how-
ever, that a final position has
been tentatively arrived at and
will be announced to the conven-
tion today or tomorrow. He said,
"We are being told to take it kind
of easy right now, 'cause we need
the whites in this thing too. But
we're not really too sure of our-
selves politically yet. We're kind
of new at all this."
The problem of whether to run
a presidential candidate has been
the second issue of major concern
so far here. Again, there seems
to be a decided young-old schism,
as the SDS line seems to be in
opposition to a national ticket,
while the older people are more
or less in favor of it. The lines
though have not become at all rig-
id.

The argument against a nation-
al campaign is that it will cost
too much mQney and will serve
only to splinter off votes from the
establishment Democrats insuring
victory for the establishment Re-
publicans, thereby accomplishing
nothing. In addition, it is said
that strong organization must be
made at the local level, contest-
ing each individual election vig-
orously.
The other side maintains that a
national ticket would make local
efforts and the entire movement
that much more visual, generating
enthusiasm for the idea and need
for new politics.
Dr. Benjamin Spock, often men-
tioned as a possible candidate for
President should the NCNP decide
to run one, said. in an interview
that he "will do anything for the
peace movement, although I'm
currently not seeking elective of-
fice."
He mentioned, as does every-
one here, his sense of being be-
trayed by Johnson, and the need
for dynamic leadership with new
approaches. He has "no enthus-
iasm" for any of the GOP candi-
dates, saying they "quibble," but
addings that he hopes by 1968
"anybody can beat Johnson,"

Three school districts Friday
postponed scheduled opening of
schools as Michigan teachers and
school districts strove to reach
agreement on contract terms.
They were the Jonesville, Mon-
tague and the Camden-Frontiex
School District, near Hillsdale.
At Montague, School Superin-
tendent Jack E. Meeder said there
was no chance schools would open
Tuesday as scheduled,.even if con-
tract agreement were reached to-
night.
"There just would not be enough
time to orientate the staff," he
said, adding, "It would not be
right for the teachers and students
to meet at the door and together
enter the building for the first
time."
At Jonesville, a special meeting
of the school board was scheduled
for tonight in an attempt to solve
the contract dispute with teachers.
At the same time, Supt. William
Tracy said school opening had
been postponed one day, to Wed-
nesday instead of the previously
scheduled opening day of Tuesday.
Tracy expressed the opinion,
however, that the problems might
not be solved in time for opening
of classes Wednesday.
The Pittsford School District
teacher group today accepted a
contract offer call for salaries
ranging from $5,800 to start for
teachers with bachelor's degrees,
with a maximum of $7,627.
The contract gives a minimum
of $6,300 for teachers starting with
a master's degree, with a maxi-
mum of $8,127. In both categories,
the maximum is reached in 10
steps over 10 years.
Meanwhile, boycotts of orien-
tation sessions were reported from
several school districts around the
state.
More than 1,000 teachers failed
to show up Thursday for orien-
tation sessions in seven school
districts where master contracts
for 1967-68 are yet to be signed.{
Each of the districts is affiliated
with the Michigan Education As-
sociation.
U

Lyle Hamilton, a field repre-
sentative for the parent National
Education Association, said the
teachers, by boycotting the orien-
tation sessions, "are indicating
they do not intend to start school
without a contract."
Kai Erickson, MEA assistant'
executive secretary, said teachers
in all 72 of the unsettled MEA dis-
tricts would boycott orientation'
sessions this week and next.
In Lansing, Lt. Gov. William
Milliken said yesterday that teach-
ers in 14 more school districts'
have reached contract settlements
with their boards of education.
The districts, with a total of
45,998 pupils, were Allen Park,
Lincoln Park, Airport (Carleton),
Blissfield, Britton-Macon, Jeffer-
son (Monroe), Huron Valley (Mil-
ford), Madison (Madison Heights),
Hopkins, Baldwin, Holton; Raven-
na, White Cloud and Gaylord.
" t
E//
6td

PAUL BUNYAN'S
COCKTAIL HOUR
4:30 to 6:30 P.M.
Reduced Prices
Zeeb Rd. at
Jackson Rd.

Milliken said agreements have
been reached in 462 districts, with
74 still unsettled.
State Board of Education presi-
dent Edwin L. Novak praised ef-
forts being made to settle teacher
contract disputes, adding that
while theoutlook is serious, it "is
not so dismal as some people
think."'
"While many districts have not
yet settled," he said, "the fact is
that many have, particularly in
recent days."
The board has urged negotiators
to bargain in good faith, Novak
said, adding that "this has been
the case in many, many instances
although attention seems to focus
on the areas where problems
exist."

Tau Systms

I

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Students!
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COLLEGIATE
For MEN-
HAIRSTYLING
And Women-
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THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

A meeting for all interested.
Bring your portfolio.

Tuesday-7:30 P.M.
420 Maynard

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
2nd floor

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-. ___________

11 '

SWEETEN
YOUR
MORNING

WoE

COFFEE

11

with

Ajjg 3tid igtau &iI

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY.

r'

Order Your Daily Now-
Phone 764-0558

I

Holwerda, Prof.
Calvin College,

11

10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship Service. Ser-
mon: "On The Boundary."
11:00 a.m.-Coffee Hour.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship Service, Ser-
mon, "Work."

CONGREGAT
State and W
Rev. Terry N
Services at 10:
Christian La
stow, preach
BETHLEHEM
CHURCH OF{
423 S. Fourt
Telephone 6
Pastors: E.
W. C. Wr
9:30 and 10:45
9:30 and 10:45
HURON HILL
Presently me
Affiliated wi
Rev. Charles
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-Co
9:45 a.m.-U.
11:00 a.m.-W
GRACE BIBLE
Corner State
663-0589
Dr. Raymond
Morning Services
9:45 a.m.-Su
Fellowship.
6:00' p.m.--Tr
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Go
Wednesday Pray
If it's Bible, you
Fundamenta

£HIPHIP.
tONAL CHURCH UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
illiam 1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
:00 a.m, - Sermon Topic:
bor." Rev. Raymond D. Bar- Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services,
ing. with sermon by the Rev. Alfred Scheips,
"Your Campus Goals."
Sunday at 11:15 a.m.-Sunday Morning Class,
UNITED "Key Doctrines of the Reformation."
CHRIST Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
h Ave. Student Organization, Supper and Program.
65-6149 Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizar, Friday at 7:00,p.m.-Chapel Choir.
ight
5 a.m.-Worship Services. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
5 a.m.-Church School. Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
LS BAPTIST CHURCH Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
eting at the YM-YWCA Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. -Horan
th the Baptist General Conf. SUNDAY
Johnson Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
ffee Presession.C c
Fellowship Bible Study.
orship Service. ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
E CHURCH 9:00 a.m.-M'orning Prayer and Holy Com-
and Huron Streets munion.
JH. Saxe, Pastor ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m-Holy Communion.
nday School and Alpha Omega 9:00 .m Holy Commurion
raining Hour-Classes for all 1 1 :00 a.m .-Holy Communion and Sermon.
7:00 p.m-Evening Prayer.
spel Services. CANTERBURY HOUSE
er Meeting at 7:30 p.m. 330 Maynard
want, come to Grace Bible-- 1 1:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Jazz Mass.
l, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

You will find our store

services-Call
CHURCH

and supplies. Our LAW section

Donald

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
1 1:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.

FIIST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister

AU -f Um

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