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September 02, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2, 1

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2,

FR EE
posterifor
your room!

Beban,
By The Associated Press __

Stabler

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If most pre-season publications
are right, you could hand the
Heisman Trophy to UCLA quarter-
back Gary Beban right now. He's
a powerful candidate.
But there's many a third down
crisis between now and the award-
ing of 1967 individual college foot-
ball honors. Before the All-Amer-
ica selectors come to write down
any names, keep an eye on such
starry candidates as Super Bill,
Stampede, Golden Shoes, Barri-
cade Bill, Yazoo, The Human
Hammer, Orange Juice, Calamity
and The Spoiler.
The Bruins' Beban, bounding
back from the broken right ankle
which kept him out of the South-
ern Cal finale last season, is a
smart field general who can pass
short or long from the pocket or
on the move. And he runs like a
man possessed.
Gary has 3,770 total offense
yards to show for two years. Used
only 10 minutes in the spring
game,1Beban played just long
enough to complete three passes1
he tried and carry six times. The
Tennessee-UCLA game at the Los
Angeles Coliseum Sept. 16 will
provide a fine comparison between
Beban-who some pro scouts feel
is better than 1966 Heisman Tro-
phy winner Steve Spurrier-andj
the Vols' fine Dewey Warren.
Notre Dame and Michigan State
have some mighty fine' quarter-
back talent in junior Terry Han-
ratty and senior Jimmy Raye, re-
spectively.
"Super Bill" Bradley, assuming
he can shake off the injuries
which dogged him as a yearling,
could steer Texas to great heights.
He can run, pass, receive, return
kicks and punts for a 42.5 'yard
average.
Florida's Larry "Stampede"
Smith is a 6'4", 216-pound half-
back who was a sophomore sen-
sation with promise of more to
come. Oscar "Golden Shoes" Reed
of Colorado State adorns the cov-
er of the NCAA Football Guide
as testimony of the esteem in
which he's held. Kent State's Don
"The Human Hammer" Fitzgerald
returns after being barely beat-
en out for the major college rush-
ing crown in 1966.
1

Lead Si
nelius Davis of Kansas State, Cot-
ton Bowl MVP Kent Lawrence of
Georgia, Dartmouth's darting
Gene Ryzewicz and Nebraska's
Ben Gregory are examples. Like-
wise Arizona's transfer, Ron Gar-
din.
McVey, a 9.5 sprinter, left the
track team long enough to ap-
pear in just one spring scrim-j
mage. He touched the ball nine
times, covering 236 yards includ-
ing a 97 yard kickoff runback.
It is a vintage halfback year.
Behind Apisa and crushing
Larry Csonka of Syracuse at full-,
back are Colorado's Wilmer Cooks,
Duke's Jay Calabrese, Georgia's
Ronnie Jenkins, Indiana's Mike,
Krivoshia, Purdue's Perry Wil-
liams and USC's Mike Hull who
has a gaudy 6.7 rushing average.
Other quarterbacks to note in-
elude Alabama's Kenny Stabler,
Danny Holman, San Jose State;
: Dick Vidmer, Michigan; Kim King,
Georgia Tech; John Eckman, Wi-
chita: Ed Podolak, Iowa; Gary
Pajcic, Florida State; Mark Reed,
Arizona; Steve Lindell, Army; Ron
r. & Burton, Colgate; Bobby Duhon,
rity - Tulane and Ed Hargett, Texas A
rity -& M.
he Tide Receivers - Richmond Flowers,
earlier Tennessee; Dennis Homan, Alaba-
ma; Jerry Levias, SMU; Freddie
Hyatt, Auburn; Haven Moses,
defensive San Diego State; Richard Trapp,
ansational Florida; John Wright, Illinois;
our. That Larry Gilbert, Texas Tech; Bill
ohn Per- Anders, Ohio State; Jim Beirne,
en, guard Purdue; Ron Drake, USC; Doug
back Bob Flansburg, Washington State;
tegory. Reggie Rucker, Boston U, and Mac
,an State Haik, Mississippi.
a, end Al Centers-Bob Johnson, Tennes-
Przybycki, see; Mike Murphy, Duke, and Bar-
ard Tony ry Wilson, LSU.
d George Offensive guards - Henry Da-
evel. And vis, Grambling; Ray Phillips,
Clyde Lee Michigan; Dave Tsaloff, Miami of
e ran for Ohio, and Utah's Norm Chown.
Defensive ends - Tom Hend-
ck crop is ricks, Miami; Mike Ford; Alaba-
n's War- ma; Mike McCaffrey, California;
3owl MVP George Foussekis, VPI; John Gar-
Sun Bowl lington, LSU, and Bob Stein,
Wyoming, Minnesota.
now, Gar- Defensive tackles-Jim Urbanek,
.nia, Cor- Mississippi; Dennis Byrd, North

Carolina State; Bill Stanfill, Geor-
gia; Greg Pipes, Baylor: Richard
Lee, Grambling; Doug Crusan.
Indiana; Steve Thompson, Wash-
ington; Joe Blake, Tulsa; Tom
Domres, Wisconsin; Glenn Green-
berg, Yale; Art Thomas, Syracuse;
Ted Gibbons, Buffalo; Lance Ols-
sen, Purdue, and Joe Greene,
North Texas State.
Middle guards - Granville Lig-,
gins, Oklahoma; Wayne Meylan,
Nebraska; Curly Culp, Arizona
State; Chuck Kyle, Purdue; Dan
Sartin, Mississippi; Gusty Year-
out. Auburn; Greg Keller, Pitt;
Blaine Nye, Stanford, and Holy
Cross' Glenn Grieco.
Linebackers - Adrian Young,
USC; Joel Brame, Texas; Mike

far

Shower

Reid, Penn State; George Bevan,
LSU; D. D. Lewis, Mississippi
State; Joe Rushing, Memphis
State; Randall Edmonds, Georgia
Tech; Ken Corbin, Miami; Don
Manning, UCLA, and Bill Enyart
of Oregon State.
Defensive backs - Bobby Johns,
Alabama; Frank Loria, VPI; Tom-
my Trantham, Arkansas; Bob
Amburlgey, Cincinnati; Dick An-
derson, Colorado; Tom Garretson,
Northwestern; Leroy Keyes, Pur-
due; Harry Heatwood, Oklahoma
State, and Stexe Luxford, Dart-
mouth.
Placekicker - Jerry DePoyster,
Wyoming.
Punter - Garry Houser, Oregon
State.

the kitchen eyie_

RICK STERN

KEN "SNAKE" STABLER thrills the crowd - not a ra
during an Alabama game last year. Stabler, kicked off th
due to "procedural difficulties' with coach Bear Bryant
this year, is back to try for All-America laurels.

Take your pick of six colorful front-page
blow-ups like this available now from your
New York Times campus rep. See him to-
day. And sign up for delivery of The New
York Times at special low college rates.

O. J. "Orange Juice" Simpson
is the 9.5 sprinted who comes to
Southern Cal, as a junior college
transfer, branded the best ball
carrier to emerge from the San
Francisco area since Ollie Matson.
At the University of Texas at
El Paso, formerly Texas Western,
lurks 6'5", 227-pound linebacker
Fred "Calamity" Carr, who has
the dashman speed and enthus-
iasm for the hunt. "Barricade
Bill" Dow is Navy's captain and
defensive end and Bill "The Spoil-
er" Staley is a 240-pound defen-
sive tackle at Utah State.
"Yazoo?" That's 6'3", 197-pound
Jim Smith, a guitar playing Eng-
lish major with a 9.8 clocking
who patrols the defensive backfield
at Oregon. Can't miss all-every-
thing, say the Ducks.
Like last year, when they fin-
ished 1-2 in the country, Notre
Dame and Michigan State have
great material. The Irish best -
without slighting Hanratty-may

well be 6'5", 270-pound
end Kevin Hardy and se
6'4" split end Jim Seymo
leaves only linebacker J
gine, safety Tom Schoe:
Dick Swatland and half
Bleier in the standout cat
Besides Raye, Michig
boasts fullback Bob Apis
Brenner, tackle Joe P
safety Jesse Phillips, gu
Conti and defensive en
Chatlos at the same le
then there is halfback C
who in one spring game
226 yards and five TD's.
Nationally, the halfba
especially strong. Housto
ren McVey, Bluebonnet B
Chris Gilbert of Texas,E
MVP Jim Klick fromy
Georgia Tech's Lenny Sn
rett Ford of West Virgi

Contact:

MARK FRANKEL

Box 241
Phone:

764-1817

Netters Advance at Nationals

i

ATTENTION

STUDENT WIVES:

By The Associated Press
FOREST HILLS, N.Y. - Both
men and women began first
rounds in the National Tennis
Championships yesterday, and all
top-seeded players advanced-but
not all will be around for the next
round.'
Third-seeded Tony Roche, the
Australian who just won the U.S.
doubles title with countryman
John Newcombe, defaulted to ex-
U.S. Davis Cupper Gene Scott of
St. James, N.Y., because of a sore
shoulder. Newcombe, top-ranked
in the tournament, turned up

with an ailment in his right leg,
but managed a 6-2, 6-2, 4-6, 6-3
triumph over 18-year-old Mike Es-
tep of Dallas, Tex.
Other first round action saw
two members of Michigan's ten-
nis squad gain victories, as jun-
iors Pete Fishback and Dick Dell
advanced to second round play.
Fishbach, from GreatNeck, N.Y.,
defeated John Sharpe of Austral-
ia, 5-7, 6-3,;6-4, 0-6, 16-14.
Dell, meanwhile, had an easier
time. The Bethesda, Marylander,
defeated Ecuadorian Eduardo. Zu-
lora, 5-7, 9-7, 6-1, 6-3-.

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN offers a wide
selection of excellent opportunities for full-time,
permanent employment. Choose from a variety of
interesting and rewarding positions including:
" OFFICE (Secretarial-Clerical)
* LIBRARY ASSISTANTS
" DATA PROCESSING (Tab, Key-
punching, Programming Systems)
* ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANTS
" NURSES (R.N. & L.P.N.)
* X-RAY TECHNICIAN

" MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS
(Clinical & Research)
" OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
" LABORATORY TECHNOLOGISTS
These positions are in a variety of academic, re-
search, patient care, and administrative units lo-
cated on the Central Campus, North Campus, Med-
ical Center & Willow Run.
Salaries commensurate with education and exper-
ience. Full fringe benefit program with wide oppor-
tunity for promotion.
Those interested in Full-time, permanent positions
contact Central Personnel, 1020 Admin. Bldg., Phone
764-7280 or Medical Center Personnel A6001, Univer-
sity Hospital, Phone 764-2172.
Part-time or temporary applicants apply, Part-time
Placement Office, 2200 Student Activities Bldg.

I

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2 or 3 persons
1 bedroom
Separate study
Furnished-$185
THE' COLONY
731 Packard-near State
663-8866

ECONO-CAJI
LABOR DAY
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SPECIALS

When there's a solid quartz boulder on your left, a spiny painful
tree branch hanging over the right, and a three foot miniature water-
fall straight ahead of you, it's best not to be on that particular river
in a canoe. And if you are, you'd better act fast.
I dropped my paddle, ducked my head and curled'up in the
bottom on the canoe.
Actually it realiy wasn't that way because you can't do it that
way on a rough river or you won't get out dry. It does take skill. A
least one experienced paddler per canpe and a good knowledgeof the
jay stroke, the sweeps'and the draws.
There is a spot like that on the Brule river way up in the North-
western corner of the state of Wisconsin. The Brule is an excep-
tionally rugged river because it is very, very narrow. and you have
to go through many dangerous spots that you you could bypass on
a wider river.
It is also a gorgeous river, though not nearly as much of a wil-
derness river as some of the others in the area. The banks rise steeply,
up to 30 feet on either side, and $25,000 homes with elaborate over-
hanging porches pop up every half mile or so.
President Calvin Coolidge spent the summer of 1928 at an
estate on the Brule built on an island in the middle of theriver
and connected to land only by two old wooden bridges. There are
a number of other buildings on the estate but a large wilderness
area surrounds it and I wonder if the entourage of reporters and
photographers didn't have to build fires and camp in the woods.
The Brule is over 15 per cent fast water, which makes it a fine
canoeing river. At one point you round a corner, only to find another
corner with a ten foot brick wall on either side staring you in the
face. Further on, there is another bend where the current is so power-
ful that the canoe is almost inevitably carried into a bank of thorny
bushes. The first time I took the, river, my bowman and I both
ducked to avoid the bushes-and swamped the canoe.
I became well acquainted with the Brule and other rivers such
as the Namekagon by working as a camp counselor at a camp near
Hayward for the past three summers.
The Namekagon makes a good' beginners trip, fun but not par-
ticularly dangerous. It is much wilder than the Brule. No houses for
ten or fifteen miles and fauna of one sort or another are always
popping out-deer, eagles, porcupines, muskrats, raccoons, not to
mention hoardes of insects. The Federal government is in the irocess
of designating a number of wild rivers to be preserved in their na-
tural state and the Namekagon is one of those being considered.
(Of course, against the background of Ann Arbor's textbooks and
football games, or Detroit's burned out blocks, it seems ridiculous to
talk about a bunch of rivers in northern Wisconsin. They are some-
what beautiful though, and a canoe trip beats a football game 49-0
in my humble opinion.
(Not that I'm trying to sound like Henry Thoreau. But the re-
moteness of it is interesting, especially in view of the fact that 200
years ago, that's the way everything was around here. The change
is no less than remarkable.
(I told a friend of mine that I was going to write a column about
canoe tripping. He laughed as cynically as I sometimes write, and
snorted "Are you kidding me? The only thing they want to read about
is LSD tripping." Which doesn't really matter, because the rivers
are very happy anyway, regardless of the people that do or don't want
to read about them) !
B~ULLETIlN!M
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GET YOUR OWN COPY TODAY.
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