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September 01, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-09-01

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TIE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1,1967

PAGE SIX

CAUTIOUSLY OPTIMISTIC:
American Election Observers
Limited by Information Lack

Russian Blockade
Draws U.S. Protest

GI Bill Ups Aid 5.4 Per Cent

WASHINGTON () - President tive days in uniform after Jan. 31.
Johnson signed into law yesterday 1955, and for their widows and
a bill giving a $286-million pack- dependents.
age of benefits to "cold war" The first-year cost is estimated

SAIGON (P) - "I don't know
what I'm doing here or what I
can eventually say about this
thing - but when the President
telephones and pleads with you
in the middle of the night to go
to, Vietnam and observe elections,
what would you do? Naturally,
accept."
This comment, from one of the
22 prominent Americans sent to
Vietnam as President Johnson's
special observers for Sunday's
elections, came after a full day
of intensive briefings, exhaustive
visits to remote polling sites and
pidgin English conversations with
Vietnamese election officials.
As they see their role, they must
wade through government red
tape to the Vietnamese voter and'
determine whether he has cast
an informed vote on his own in-;
itiative in a democratic election1

-- or whether he has been un-
fairly influenced and his vote
snatched illegally.
Few think they can make such
an evaluation.
The group plans no joint re-
port. They say they plan to stop
in Honolulu en route home for a
bull session, some of which likely
would be relayed to the White
House.
The official program for the
observers yesterday indicated to
all of them the great limitations
they would be working under in
the next few days.
Gov. Richard J. Hughes of New
Jersey said after a whirlwind visit
to the province of Binh Dufong
just north of Saigon: "I have
not seen enough to make a flat
judgment about the validity of
the elections. I may not see

enough even in the next several
days."
Whitney Young, president of the
Urban league, said: "We have no
illusions about what we can do."
Gov. Thomas L. McCall of Ore-
gon, who spent an afternoon
traipsing through a Mekong del-
ta village in fatigues, noted: "I
don't think we will have enough
information - ever - to fully
evaluate what's going on here."
Some of the observers, such as
Sen. George Murphy, R-Calif., felt
that they could determine in-
stinctively, i f n o t factually,
whether the election was clean or
soiled.
"I think we can tell from watch-
ing people go to the polls whether
the thing looks fair," Murphy
said. "You have to rely mostly
on instinct."
Yesterday's program proved un-
satisfactory to several of the ob-
servers and they intend to ignore
the U.S. Embassy schedule for
the remainder of the visit, and
head off alone to try and deter-
mine for themselves the pulse of
the Vietnamese voter.

WASHINGTON (P)-The United
States accused the Soviet Union
yesterday of denying two U.S. ice-
breakers passageway through an
Arctic strait off Russia and thus
blocking a valuable scientific ex-
pedition around the North Pole.
Instead of forcing the ice-
breakers Edisto and East Windf
through the Vilkitsky Straits,
Washington canceled their plan-
ned voyage and lodged a strong
diplomatic protest maintaining
the international legal rights of
the ships to innocent passage.
At issue is whether vessels may
sail freely through the channel?
connecting two portions of high
seas-as the United States claims
-or whether the Soviets controli
the passageway because it runs
through Russian territorial waters, 1
as Moscow contends.
A similar question was posed
with Egypt's announced anti-Is-
rael blockade of the Aqaba Gulf
which triggered the Middle East
crisis earlier this summer. The
United States holdsthat ships
have the right of innocent passage
through straits linking high seas
even though the connecting chan-
nel goes through national waters.
Now an issue in the icebreaker
incident is the difference between
the U.S. claim that a country's
territory extends only three miles
offshore and the Soviet claim of

11 miles.
ning bets
land and
Venlya I
across at
State I
Carl Bart
of innoce
through
national
parts of t

The Vilkitsky Strait, run-
ween the Russian main-
d the Soviet Severnaya
slands, is about 24 miles
its narrowest.
Department press officer
tch said "there is a right
ent passage of all ships
straits used for inter-
navigation between two
he high seas."

veterans and the men on the
Vietnamese battle lines.
Twenty-eight casualties of the
war there, most in hospital garb
and many in wheel chairs and
casts, looked on at the ceremonial
bill-signing in the White House
East Room,
The bill provides pension, edu-
cational and other benefits for
veterans who served 180 consecu-

Anti-LBJConvention Meets'
To Devise Strategy for '68
CHICAGO (A)-A delegation of and in Newark after they left.
left wing activists met with peace They are Communists, liars and
and civil rigths leaders yesterday thieves."
to develop strategy aimed at de- Among the convention delegates
feating President Johnson in 1968 are representatives from Students
and ending the war in Vietnam. for a Democratic Society, Student
The five-day convention is Nonviolent Coordinating Commit-
sponsored by the National Con- tee, Congress of Racial Equality,
ference for New Politics; a New Southern Christian Leadership
York-based organization formed Congress and the Committee for
last year to support liberal and a Sane Nuclear Policy.
left wing peace candidates.
The delegates included Arniold
Johnson of New York, who said he,
is public relations director and a
member of the party's national
committee; Thomas Dennis of De- L iberation'
troit; Gilbert Green of New York,
and Claude Lightfoot and James,

at $285,600,000.
Johnson told his audience, made
up largely of members of Con-
gress, federal officials, executives
of veterans organizations and the
current Miss America, that the
bill is in great part for those on
the line in Vietnam.
Johnson said that "every single
day, and every single waking
hour" he is working with every
resource .at his command to has-
ten the day when the war in
Vietnam will be resolved peace-
fully.
"The forces who launched that
war now, at this moment," Johnson
said, "are tragically using every
terroristic plan, practice or de-
vice they can conceive to try to
stop the people of Vietnam from
freely electing their own govern-
ment.
"The aggressors m u s t rea-
lize that they cannot defeat the
efforts of the South Vietnamese
people to secure and strengthen
their nation, nor can they, by
their speeches or their propagan-
ri n Predicts.
o 7V
of Negroes
dom which the Negro man always
has shown in fighting for his
county.
"He will show this same will in
fighting against his country when
he returns with his knowledge."

da, deter America's commitment
to assist them.
"Until that realization comes,
then we Americans are going to-
we Americans must-man the line
where that commitment runs."
Johnson said the new benefits
bill is a way of saying to a na-
tion's men at arms in Vietnam
and elsewhere that America does
not forget.
He said also it will help needy
veterans of past conflicts by:
-Providing funds to help re-
turning servicemen with their
education or with job training un-
derthe GI Bill of Rights signed 18
months ago. It will help those
with families more than single
men.
-Giving men now in uniform
the same veterans benefits their
predecessors in other wars re-
ceive.
-Increasing pensions of two
million veterans and widows an
average of 5.4 per cent to raise
the living standards of the older
and poorer pensioners.
Most of the act's provisions be-
come effective Oct. 1.
Johnson noted that the first
year's cost of the bill at $285
million is $115 million' more than
he proposed to Congress.
While he reaffirmed the need
for "utmost restraint in our
spending," he noted the higher
figure was approved without a
single dissenting vote in either
Senate or House.
And he said he could accept
the increase in good conscience
because of the compelling fact
that most of the extra funds will
be invested in education and job-
training which are corner-stones
of his administration's program.

B ULETI!
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This is the only Webster with the guidance you need
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Owning your own copy is much easier and avoids the
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GET YOUR OWN COPY TODAY.
WEBSTER'S SEVENTH NEW COLLEGIATE
You'll recognize it by the bright red jacket.

4

These include Gov. McCall
Eugene Patterson, editor of
Atlanta Constitution.

and
the

I

West, both of Chicago.
Start Third Party
Some observers believe the con-
vention will seek to start a third
political party but Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., who has been
mentioned as a possible presiden-
tial candidate on such a ticket,
announced" in advance he would

MIAMI, Fla. (A) - Black Power
leader H. Rap Brown predicted
yesterday in an interview on Ha-
vana Radio that when trained
Negro troops return to the United
States from Vietnam, "they will
use their skills to liberate the
Negro people."
'Active Genocide'

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
'a2 a id ms ti{::;': "r%:::t":"} #s m a'": }?.i"'i::T:":4:::tq""""XS +:::}vi:'r":"y"ist iS ":{-:^T.";:T}4.{;a:{:". ' r

othaepfotiBrown charged the U.S. is
The foundationeforyco~nventionpracticing "a c t i v e genocide"
action was laid Tuesday and Wed- against Negroes, killing them in
nesday when several committees Vinam ards, thenstre of
started discussions on the struc- Ameramandoitsrs.o
ture perspectives and possible po-
sitions the NCNP would take. "The sending of Negro soldiers
Joseph Dawson, son of U.S.in preference to whites to certain
Rep. William A. Dawson, Negro fighting fronts in Vietnam is an
congressman from Illinois' 1st Dis- active type of genocide. It is not
trict, visited conference headquar- an accidert that 30 per cent of
ters yesterday in advance of the the lossses in Vietnam are Negroes
convention, and told newsmen' and that 22 per cent of the forces
"You don't have a convention here, there are Negro," Brown declared.
you have a hell here." "Genocide is being committed
Dawson declared he was vigor- against the Negro population-
ously opposed to the convention in other words, the Negro popu-
and would take no part in it. lation is regarded as a problem
'Riot by Implication' and they are managing this pro-
"These people have come in blem through genocide."
from outside and are destroyingL
the image that we in Chicago have 'Liberethe Negro'
been working all summer to build," Brown forecast that the Negro
he said. "These people will cause soldiers returning from Vietnam
a riot by implication - by what "are going to be the most vigorous
they say-and it will filter into fighters because they have the'
the neighborhoods and arouse the skills and when they return to
Negro community to start rioting." America, this skill will be used in
"There will be rioting," Daw- liberating the Negro people with
son added. "I saw it in Detroit the same implacable will for free-
WELCOME STUDENTS and FACULTY
HOLIDAY HAIR FASHIONS
ts For that cared-for, care-free look,
visit our professional staff on campus
at the corner of State & Liberty.
CALL TODAY FOR:
~i . SPECIAL CUTS
" TINTING
* FROSTING
v * MODERN STYLING
622 East Liberty 663-2429
.;r Ct < )G'>0<"""" f<""> <"""> G<"""> G<" C">)""""><"""><""">< l

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility, Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
Day Calendar
1967 Fall Series Special Events-Ap-
ply at Hill Aud. lobby 7-9 p.m. today
or 1053 Administration Bldg., weekdays
8-5 p.m.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Bureau of Appointments and Occupa-
tional Information hours, 8:30-12 and
1:30-4:30 Monday-Friday. Information
on companies, government, general lit-
erature available, job listings current
on file. Recruiting season begins Sept.
28. If interested please register or bring
any files you have up to date, new ad-
dresses are important for mailing lists.
Min. of 12 hours required for all serv-
ices.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Chrysler Corp., Detroit - Systems
Analyst, Data Processing, various levels
in many departments. Pref. exper. or
trng. in data processing tech. & lan-
guages, good math background.
Ford Motor Co., Ypsilanti - Payroll
Analyst, man pref., some college and
exper. in acctg. or payroll operations.
Local Law Office-Woman for sec-
retary, typing, shorthand pref., perma-
nent resident.
Martin Marietta Corp., Aetna Cement
Co.,' Bay City, Mich.-Architectural Ap-
prentice, consultant to arch, in tech.
pplications in cement construction and
materials, not a sales position. BA in
arch., no previous exper., under 35.
Local Foundation-Secretary-Recep-
tionist, permanent person to type and
answer phone.
Local Office-Secretary, general sec-
retarial work and some editing and

i

layout work, some exper. in these fields
helpful.
Ford Tractor Div., Birmingham, Mich.
-Parts Programming Analyst, staff
position in manuf., production control,
function conitrol over international di-
vision, BBA/BSE in Bus. Ad. or Engi-
neering, any areas, good grades, recent
grad. or under 5 yrs. exper.
General Motors Institute, Mgmt. Trng.
Dept., Flint, Mich.-Program Leader
for intensive industrial mgmt. programs.
Bach. level required, more preferred,
bkgds. in Ed., Bus. Ad. or Behavorial
Sciences, some teaching exper. helpful.
Accredited institute, most staff in field,
programs in managerial respon., labor
relations to laboratory and sensitivity
training, and others of broad range.
Area Mgmt. Consulting and Acetg.
Firm-Writer-Editor. Woman, BA Journ.
Prepare material for clients, magazine
articles. Writer, detailed editor, bus.
background helpful.
Laidlaw Bros. Div., Doubleday N Co.
-Agent-Consultant, man BA/MA lib.
arts field, pref. 4-5 yrs. exper. in teach-
ing or school admin.
City of Oak Park, Mich.-Head Li-
brarian, MLS, with some exper.
Michigan Employment Security Com-
mission, Detroit, Mich: - Employment
Test Trainee, BA with 18 hrs. in Psych,,
testing or statistics, research position,
studies with aptitude and proficiency.
1 yr. training period.
* * *
For further information please call
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
Summer Placement Service, 212 SAB,
lower level. Hours 10-12 and 1-5 Mon-
day-Friday.
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.
Guild House plans a luncheon Sept.
1, 1-5 p.m., at 802 Monroe, the speak-
er will be George Mendenhall: "Re-
dressing the Balance before Arab-Is-
raeli Peace."
Young Friends are planning outing
to Friend's Lake, Sept. 3, 5:30 p.m., at
1420 Hill St.
Baha'i Student Group plans an infor-
mal discussion on "What is the Baha'i
Faith" on Sept. 1 at 8 .pm. at 520
Ashley. Transportation offered if you
call 662-3548.

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