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August 31, 1967 - Image 133

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST &1, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

National Guard Tries

" 1 Insurance Firms Suspend
o Polisl Image rFor Riot Area Cancellation

WASHINGTON (R) - National
Guard officers have hired a Madi-
son Avenue advertising agency in
a $50,000 effort to blot out criti-
cism of the Guard's performance
in recent big city riots.
The unusual advertising cam-
paign underscores the concern
with which many Guard officers
view the post-riot criticism.
"We're in a bind - we're on
1 the defensive," says Maj. Gen.
James F. Cantwell, president of
the 45,000-member National
Guard Association of the United
States.
Other Guard officers link the
critical comments to the Guard's
long-standing feud with the Pen-
s tagon over reorganization of the,
reserves. And some say the situa-
tion illustrates the hostility that
exists between reserve and active
forces.
Cantwell said his association is
sponsoring the advertising cam-
paign because "we believe we've
got to place before the public an
honest reminder of what the
Guard has done, and has always
done."
The group's 30-member execu-
tive committee authorized the ac-
tion two days after a presidential
panels investigating the riots in-

directly criticized the Guard oni
three points-the adequacy of its
riot control training, the number
of Negro Guardsmen and the com-
petency of Guard officers.
Then last week, Lt. Gen. John;
L. Throckmorton, commander of
federal troops during the Detroit
riot, told a'House subcommittee "I
was confronted with a group of
trigger-happy, nervous soldiers in
the National Guard."
Two days later, the first in a
series. of full-page advertisements
appeared in the New York Times
and the Washington Post, pur-
porting to give "the true facts
concerning the Guard."
Tuesday, another advertisement
devoted to the Guard's role in riot
control appeared in the Times.
"We pray our cities will not be
battlefields," the full-page ad said.
"But if it does happen, if havoc
is repeated in our streets, the Na-
tional Guard, as always, will re-
spond.
"Order will be maintained.
"The people willbe protected.
"The laws of the nation will be
upheld.
"Rest assured."
Still other ads will be publish-
ed in New York and Washington
newspapers next week, an associa-

tion spokesman said, and some He pointed to the presidential
may appear in other newspapers panel's recommendations t h a t
around the country. more Negroes be recruited for the
The association retained the firm Guard and that officer qualifica-
of Durand Sapan, Inc., 555 Madi- tions be reviewed.
son Ave., New York, to prepare "These recommendations were
and place the ads. made too quickly without being
Sources pegged the campaign delved into in depth," Cantwell
cost "in the neighborhood of $50,- said. "Both of them imply that
000"-about one-tenth the associ- something is basically wrong. In
ation's annual budget. neither case is this so.
The tax-exempt association re- Maj. Gen. Winston P. Wilson,
ceives no government funds, the chief of the National Guard Bu-
spokesman said, and is supported reau, also contended criticism of
solely by annual dues ranging the Guard "has not been justified
from $7.50 for lieutenants to $20 because it hasn't been substantiat-
for generals. The group's mem- ed. We feel we have done the
bership list is almost identical with job in every instance, although it's
the Army and Air National not a nice job."
Guard's officer rolls. Wilson was asked in an inter-

it is more competition than con-
flict, and we like competition."
But Rep. F. Edward Hebert (D-
La), chairman of the subcommit-
tee investigating the handling of
the riots, says his panel's hear-
ings have brought the conflict in-

The question of state's rights
has become entwined in the reor-
ganization controversy since Guard
units consider themselves state mi-
litia.
The reorganization furor has
caused unrest and low morale

to the open. among Guardsmen, some officers
"There's nothing better than a say. There also are equipment
good family fight," Hebert said. shortages in some units.
"It's a healthy thing. Now it's Some outfits are particularly,
out in the open instead of being short of communications gear -
pushed under the rug as it has two-way radios and the like. This
for many years." was illustrated by the testimony
The dispute began four years of Michigan's adjutant general,
ago when Secretary of Defense Maj. Gen. C. C. Schnipke, when
Robert S. McNamara proposed a he appeared before Hebert's com-
merger of the National Guard mittee.
and Army Reserve. This was When one unit commander seal-
blocked by Congress. ed off a six-block area during the
The Pentagon since has come up Detroit riot, Schnipke said, he
with other reorganization plans- Deoidreoh, gohmpke sa
each one opposed by the politically found he "had good communca-
powerful Guard and its friends on tions until he ran out of dimes
Capitol Hill. for the pay telephone."

LANSING M)-The State In- censes would depend on the e
surance Commission says it has come of current investigations.
ordered two property insurance Wickstrom said Citizens Cast
firms to cease writing policies in ty Co. has cancelled about
Michigan pending an investigation policies that would be expiring
of policy cancellations. 1968 and were allowing to ex
Chief Deputy Commissioner John some 800 policies whose terms
W. Wickstrom said the order was out in 1967.
issued against the U.S. Liability
Insurance Co. of King of Prussia, j U.S. Liability is transferring
Pa., and the Citizens Casualty Co. risks on some 1,463 policies to
of New York. Mt. Vernon Fire InsuranceI
Wickstrom said the two firms, which is not licensed in Michig
dealing primarily in fire and ex- and have cancelled outright s
tended coverage insurance, had 300 policies, Wickstrom added.
violated a 90-day moratorium on ,He said the commission c
cancellations requested by Coin- siders the two firms' action
missioner David J. Dykhouse fol- "an abuse of their licensesf
lowing the Detroit riots. detrimental to policy holderss
"We have had general compli- the insuring public of the state
ance with the moratorium with Meanwhile, a legislative coo
the exception of the two com- nating' committee has handed
panies," Wickstrom said. riot study assignments to pr
He added that any action to the areas of insurance, crimes
revoke the firms' Michigan 11- education.

3U
gty
G
)r

i

Cantwell, who also is head of
New Jersey's Guard, said there
has been "no direct criticism of
the Guard. It's all been implied or
innuendoes."

view about the apparent under-
current of hostility between the
Guard and the active Army.
"I don't think there is a con-
flict at all," he replied. "I think

UGLI Institutes Mechanized
Overnight Reserve System

By JENNY STILLER
The Underaduate Library is
Initiating a new system of com-
puterized check-out. of overnight-
and closed-reserve books.
The new procedures will in-
crease the equity and efficiency
of the reserve system; UGLI offi-
cials say.
Under the system,; made pos-
sible by the new student identifi-
cation cards, the charging and
discharging of such books, and
the computation of fines, will be
done automatically by IBM ma-
chines.
Overnight books, as well as
books and periodicals on closed
reserve, will be kept behind the
charging desk at the south end
of the main floor of the UGLI.
They will be charged out for four-
hour, or, when there is heavy
demand, two-hour periods for
building use during the day.
Availability Increased
Overnight books are being re-
moved from the stacks to increase
their availability to students, ac-
cording to Librarian Rose-Grace
Faucher:
Previously, such books were
shelved along with three- and
one-week books, and in order to be
able to take them. out overnight,
students would come into the
UGLI early in the day to hide
them, returning to pick them up
at 9 p.m., the checkout time. Be-
cause of this, other students were
unable to use the books during
the day.
Often books would be unavail--
able to students wanting them

because of delays involved in re-
shelving them after others had
used them, Miss Faucher noted.
"The aim of the whole system
is service," Miss Faucher said.
"We hope now to be able to have
these books when the students
want them."
Only Call Number
Students wishing to check out
a reserve book will need only
write the call number of the book
or article they want on an abbre-
viated version of an IBM card
from the pocket in the back of
the bogk and the student's I.D.
card will be fed into a computer,
which records all the appropriate
information.
Then a time clock is used to
record on the book card the time
the book was checked out. so the
student will know when to return
it.
When a book is returned, the
book card is run through the
computer again, which automat-
ically disclarges the book. Should
a book be returned late, the com-
puter also calculates the' fine
which is due on it.
Books are put on overnight or
closed reserve at the request of
professors and other instructors
who wish to assign them for their
courses. At the end of each se-
mester, the reserve shelves will
be cleaned out and only the books
requested for reserve for the new
semester kept behind the desk.
Desks and chairs for studying
formerly located in the area occu-
pied by the reserve charging desk
have been moved to other areas
of the UGLI.

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