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August 31, 1967 - Image 127

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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'THURSDAY: AI'G" UST 31, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY. AUGUST 31. 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

the kitchen cynic.------
RICK ST ERN

Squad Depleted By Graduation Losses

i;

Something Else' That
Beats Football An yway
Traditionally a Daily columnist's first fall piece deals with the
upcoming football season. But I just .got here and I can't hardly even
tell you Bump Elliot's first name without looking in my football
press guide and since I don't have time I'll have to break this dear
tradition and look for something else to say.
The best something else I can think of tonight, before I've even
had a chance to unpack such reference material as my Vest Pocket
Enoyclopedia of Baseball, should be of considerable interest to Junior
and Senior Wolverine boosters who remember a former Daily sports
editor by the name of Lloyd Graff.
For a whole year (1965-66) Lloyd pounded out once or twice
weekly what was probably the most controversial as well the
most insignificant column in Daily history, if such a paradox is
allowable.
He filled literally hundreds of Luke Cooperrider's precious inches
with ditties such as Pinky Lee's maiden name and Superman's true
parentage, not to mention the Lloyd Graff fan club which he spon-
sored himself. Surprisingly enough most of the readers loved it and
the ones that didn't hated him enough to make him a genuine figure
of note on the campus. A roommate of mine one threatened to kill
Lloyd and even came all the way over the Daily building one after-
noon with half the intention of doing so.
Anyway, my dad eats lunch with Lloyd's dad on the south side
of Chicago every so often and at one meeting early in July Mr. Graff
reported that his son was about to have a tryout with the Chicago
Cubs. I was away at the time and didn't hear about the whole thing
until maybe a month later. I still haven't seen Lloyd, though he's
returned to Ann Arbor after a year at Northwestern, law school, so
most of what is recorded here is either rumor and or legend.
Everybody dreams one in his life of being a major leaguer, earn-
ing thousands and leading great teams to stirring victories. Most,
however, will have given up the dream by the time they're 23 or 24,
especially if they've never even been on a baseball team: Not Lloyd
Graff.
When Cub lefthander Ken Holtzmann was called off the
mound to servesix months of active duty in one or another of the
military servikes, leaving the Cubs with a serious pitching gap,
Lloyd decided that this was his chance for glory. He wrote to the
Cubs and told them he could burn up the National League if
they would just give him a chance.
Actually, now that I recall, Lloyd did play one or two games of
high school baseball but only as a Senior (at University High School
on the south, side). I believe that he came about five times as a
pinch hitter and struck out each time, after which the coach sug-
gested that he direct his efforts elsewhere.
I don't know if he claimed to have been on the disabled list
ever since, or what, but the Cubs sent him a letter back and told him
to report for a tryout in Wrigly Field.
Exactly what happened at the tryout I don't know. One
friend of mine who talked to Lloyd a week or so after said that
Lloyd claimed that the coach- "was only watching when I threw
a bad one. Everytime I hummed one over, he'd be looking at some
other bird." Perhaps H I can find Lloyd in Ann Arbor I'll ask him
to verify the report and print some of his comments in a future
epistule.
At any rate, the Cubs decided that it takes more than gall and
ego to win in the big leagues so Lloyd got his walking papers very
quickly. I wouldn't be a bit surprised, however, if he asked them for
a cut of the World Series money just on general principles!

(Continued from Page 1)
When anyone mentions Michi-
gan's center position he almost in-
variably also gives its virtual syno-
nym, Joe Dayton, a starter for the
past two years and now the team
captain. Dayton, who draws El-
liott's admiration for his con-
sistency, will be backed by Paul
D'Eramo, who is also a part-time
kicker.
The Wolverines defensive unit
will feature experience up front
but 16ss and less sorry as one goes
toward the backs.

Senior Rocky Rosema, who has
acted more and more like a rock
since his sophomore year, and
junior Tom Stincic, who took over
the other end spot last year, will
almost certainly retain their start-
ing jobs. Trying to pressure their
way on to the starting team will
be Jon Heffelfinge and Phil Sey-
mour, cousin of Notre Dame's Jim.
Jon Kramer, Michigan's third
top-flight end last year, is favor-
ed to take the middle guard posi-
tion over Dennis Monthei.

At tackle, seniors Dick William-
son and former NCAA heavy-
weight wrestling champ Dave Por-
ter will fight junior Gerald Miklos
for the two jobs. And if any of
these falter Bill Mouch .6'4", 270

'M' Squads Fail To Cop
S ingle Conference Crown

pounds will be available for serv-
ice.
Linebacking is another strong
spot for the Wolverines, with Den-
nis Morgan, who was leading the
Big Ten in tackles last season un-
til he was injured, and speedy
Bob Wedge. Both should be press-
ed for their jobs, however, by pro-
sized Texan Cecil Pryor, who lit-
erally amazed Elliott during spring
practice.
The big problem spot in the
overall outlook is the defensive
backfield. Jerry Hartman, the on-
ly letterman, is best known as a
hockey player, but he was one
of the most impressive prospects
in spring practice, along with
trackman George Hoey. Hoey used
his great speed to return a punt
85 yards in the first spring prac-
tice game.
The other two spots should go
to sophomores Brian Healy and
Tom Curtis, both former high
school quarterbacks.
Senior Doug Nelson also figures
in the picture along with Al Doty,
Bob Kieta, andanother sopho-
more, Barry Pierson.
Noting his great number of
sophomores, Elliott muses "the
football team will sputter a little
at first as the sophomores get ex-
perienced, but the time the Big
Ten season gets going this team
could be right in the thick of
the race."
A mansion in Southern Califor-
nia could be the result.

Michigan athletic teams wound
up the 1966-67 schedules without
a Big Ten championship for the
first time since 1951. However, the
Wolverines finished second in the
composite Big Ten rankings, be-
hind Michigan State.
In seven of the sports on the
Big Ten calendar, Michigan fin-
ished as runner-up -- swimming,
wrestling, hockey, gymnastics,
baseball, tennis and golf. The 1966
football team tied with Illinois for
FINAL COMPOSITE
STANDINGS

third while the track squad fin-
ished fifth indoors and fourth out-
doors. Basketball was the only
sport to finish in the lower divi-
sion with tenth place. The hockey
team also finished fourth in the
Western College Hockey Associa-
tion race.
Michiganfinished with 7.36
"quality points," as compared to
Michigan State's total of 8.62.
Quality points are obtained by di-
viding the number of points ac-
cumulated on the basis of 10 for
first, nine for second, etc., in the
final standing by the number of
sports in which a conference
school entered a team.

HALFBACK ERNIE SHARPE turns the corner in one of several
appearances as a starter last season. Sharpe, halfback Ron
Johnson and fullback Warren Sipp will team up with quarter-
back Dick Vidmer in the Wolverine starting backfield this fall.

Michigan State
MICHIGAN
Wisconsin
Iowa
Minnesota
Indiana
Ohio State
Purdue
Illinois r
Northwestern

Quality Pts.
8.62
'7.36
6.37
6.08
5.77
5.27
4.90
4.33
4.29
3.25

JOE DAYTON

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