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August 31, 1967 - Image 125

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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Y

Sir igau

7Datly

Seventy-Seven Years of Editorial Freedom
VOL. LXXVIIJ, No. 1 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1967 SECTION THREE
....:.: ...........ng...Mn....vna CA'ad

TEN PAGES

Behind Closed Doors

M,

Gridiron

Chances:

Elliott

Faces

BOB McFARLAND

The Big Ten:
Scandals and Schedules
Revenge is sweet, saith the sportswriter . . especially when
you're out to smash the reputation of the once invulnerable Big
Ten.
Whether his favorite team is drubbing a tarnished Western
Conference foe in a -non-conference contest, or he remember's that
it's for another "Remember Illinois column, makes little difference
to many of the nation's scribes, steadfastly determined to destroy
the myth of Big Ten domination. Either subject is more thai adequate
for his sharpened typewriter keys.
'They wouldn't be so bitter if the Big Ten had been satisfied only
with winning. But the Western Conference accomplished what it did
with its hands tied, voluntarily yet. The Big Ten set minimal ad-
mission standards for athletes, limited their squads' traveling roster,
placed restrictions on recruiting, and generally played the part of
the good guy.
Last year, the Big Ten limped through a non-conference
football schedule to a dismal 11-17-1 mark. The "fourth estate"
'gleefully charged to their desks, and had the most fun they ever
'had with the proud Big Ten. Soon after the curtain fell on the
grid season, the slush fund scandal at Illinois broke. Suspicions
confirmed, case closed. What everyone "knew" to be the case
anyway had been proven. The Western Conference was no holier
than thou,,or anybody else.
The sister institutions of the Fighting Illini found what "guilt
by association" meant. Illinois was sentenced, and the conference was
condemned. No mercy for the victors turned losers, the heroes turned
villains.
So I sat and wondered just what all the bleak tidings meant for
the Wolverines and the Big Ten. Was the conference on its way down?
Would high standards be sacrificed before the altar of gridiron glory
in the wake of Illinois?
The crystal ball wasn't working just right, however. It never does
when storm clouds fog up the glass. Athletic Director H. O. (Fritz)
Crisler seemed to have the best chance of clearing the matter- up
for me.
A familiar figure around the Big Ten since he took over the
Michigan football held in 1938 (Criser moved into the athletic dir-
ectorship in 1941), he held some definite opinions on the current
state of the Big Ten.
"I don't think the quality of Big Ten fpotball has slipped
recently," Crisler said Monday. 'The quality is high, but it's just
being put to a sterner test."
Three factors have resulted in the improvement of Big Ten
opposition, according to Crisler. In the first place, everyone is try-
ing harder. Major colleges solicit funds nationwide for their aid
programs. It only makes sense that the more and bigger scholarships
lead to more and bigger players. Michigan remains the only school
in the Western Conference that does not solicit funds for its aid
program, relying chiefly on football receipts instead. *
In addition to this development, the "breathers" on Big Ten
football schedules have all expired. The conference has not only been1
required to expand the size of the schedule, but also its quality. Col-
legiate athletics are a big business today with football revenues pay-
ing the way. A better opponent means a bigger gate.
. A quick check - of the Big Ten's non-conference schedule'
verifies this trend. Three contests are with members of the Big
Eight, two with the Southeast Conference, four with the South-
west Conference, one with the Atlantic Coast Conference, six with
the Pacific Eight, and four with the Western Conference. The list
of independents includes only Pittsburgh, Miami (Fla.), Navy,
and Houston, in addition to Notre Dame, who will knock heads
with the Big Ten on four separate occassions.
Finally, Criser cites the redshirt rule and 1.6 gradepoint required
by the NCAA for an athlete to receive financial aid. The Western
Conference has a 1.7 gradepoint standard and an athlete must com-
plete his eligibility in four years, unless he is allowed an extra year
because of injury, as is the case with Wolverine quarterback Dick
Vidmer.
Is the Conference planning to liberalize some of its more strin-
gent rules in the aftermath of the Illinais crisis? Cisler replied that
the conference has several study committees in session at the present
time. They are attempting to sound out Big Ten feeling on issues
raised by the Illinois scandal anl propose changes if necessary.
One committee is concerning itself with the penalty mechanisms
within the Conference. Another is attempting to discern whether the
Big Ten should recodify its regulations after every session of the
conference faculty representatives. On the request of some members
who feel disadvantaged in recruiting because Big Ten rules are stiffer
than corresponding NCAA codes, a third body is making recommen-
dations in this area. Another group is working with the aid question,
and studying whether the Big Ten should adopt the widespread
practice of giving each athlete $15 a month for laundry money.
Take heart, sportswriters. The Big Ten may be preparing to
loosen its belta little anyway. You can move the Western Conference
pedestal down a notch, but don't count on the 11-17-1 record becom-
ing a trend.
VOLK, CLANCY START:
Eight Grid Grads,111

Major

Rebuilding

Job

for

C ontention

By MARK HALPERT

switched to fullback to make room

When head football coach Bump for sophomore Jim Mandich, who
Elliott talks about rebuilding, he had a brilliant spring. "And Sipp
isn't simply looking for a home has proved to be a real find at his
improvement loan. More like a new position," Elliott explained.
new house altogether. "He was a star fullback in high
Graduated from the team that school, and has the necessary
GrdutedIn fro thr ta tht speed and drive to make it." Frank
tied with Illinois for third in the Itsaoheimrsvesp-
Big Ten last year were eight of-,Totasrres sesond
fensive starters and six starters mtr fuhackwrestinthemsetd
fro th deensve nit inludngstring fullback position from let-
from the defensive unit, including terman John Reynolds.
the entire secondary.
"We have to 'rebuild our entire Sharpe Sharp
offense and replace the starting R e t u r n i n g lettermen Er-
backfield on defense," Elliott gulp- nie Sharpe and Ron Johnson
ed before spring practice last year. Will complete the offensive back-
He is making progress. But it's too 'field at the left and right half-
early to tell whether the roof will back positions. Both men saw lim-
fall n. ited action last year. but were im-
Elliott has lost 22 lettermen, in- pressive in their brief trials. How-
cluding 14 starters. Missing are eve. Sharpe and Johnson have
five individual leaders in last recently been pressed by a pair
year's conference statistics - All- of rugged sophomores, John Gab-
Americaend JTask C, T na inn a ler and Garvie Craw.

operation that incapacitated him be Elliott's top candidate for the
for the year. other guard spot.
Sophomores who are rated a Joe Kunsa and Bob Baum-
chance at an offensive end posi- gartner also capable guard pros-
tion are Bill Harris and Tom .pects, while Dick Caldarazoo is the
Weinman. top sophomore candidate.
Despite the fact that there are The only returning letterman at
no returning lettermen at offen- offensive tackle returning to that
sive guard, senior Ray Phillips, position this year is Pete Mair,
a converted tackle could help turn who might be given a' starting
the position into one of the team's shot. Phillips' former positioh will
strongpoints. Phillips has con- likely be filled by Bob Penska.
sistently been mentioned as Mich- Other tackle prospects are Paul
Sigan's best lineman and is rated Johnson. two years ago a defensive
a top All-America candidate. letterman, Stan Broadnax, and
Meyer Morton Trophy (for most sophomores Joe Lukx and Werner
improved player in spring prac- Hall.
tice) winner Dick Yanz seems to See SQUAD, Page 3
1967 Roster

r
r
1
r

i

JUIMILf t tAlu dtu& a acy nI p ss
receptions: Stan Kemp in punt-
ing: Jim Detwiler in kickoff re-
turns: defensive halfback Rick
Sygar in punt returns; and line-
backer Frank Nunley in tackles.
Lone Wolf
Quarterback Dick Vidmer, who
lofted ten touchdown passes to tie
the conference, record last season.
is the lone returning offensive
back. Besides Detwiler at left half,j
the Wolverines must find replace-
ments for Carl Ward at right half-
back and fullback Dave Fisher.
Vidmer should receive much-
needed help from letterman War-
ren Sipp, who operated at tight
end last season but has been;

WOLVERINE FIELD GENERAL Dick Vidmer eyes a receiver
far downfield as Michigan marched to a 6-4 record last year.
The only returnee from last year's starting backfield, Vidmer will
lead a sophomore-laden team into the 1967 season.

FOOTBALL OUTLOOK:
W olverilne Grid Prospec1
* By BOB LEES go through the 1967 season unde- '
sin the bag, feated, suffering only a tie with
At least, that's the way abase- Navy, and then smash down a;
ball fan, or any other type of Pacific Eight foe in the Rose Bowl.
sports fan who craves statistics, Statistics don't lie, remember? t *.
would figure it. But they don't fool too many
According to previous records people wither.
against all 10 opponents this year, . Wishful Thinking
Michigan's football team should Even though the Wolverines
have managed to drop two of lastf
year's victorious opponents from
this season's schedule (North
Carolina and Purdue), two others
-Michigan State and Illinois-
must be faced, and the Maize and .
Blne prospects in both instances
are not promising. Yet both the
Spartans and Illini have question
marks, as do most of the remain-
ing eight Wolverine foes.
p Following the tradition of pre-
vious years, Michigan will open
its season against three non-con-.
ference opponents before entering
into the Big Ten wars. And va-
riety is the keynote here, with
representatives from the South,<
the East and the Far West doing
battle on the gridiron with the
BWolverines. rr

. Replacement of Clancy at split Name
right end and Clayton Wilhite at Arcure James
tight end were two of the major Banar, James
problems facing the coaching staff Barnes, Tom
during spring practice. At least Baumgartner, Robert
one of these problems has been .
solved by the presence of Man- Berine, James
dich, who reminds Elliott of Ron
Kramer when the former Wolver- Bolduc, William
ine All-America end was a sopho- Broadnax, Stanley
more. Brown, Dennis
The split end position mono- Brown, Richard
polized by Clancy last year should Caldarazzo, Richard
be occupied by his understudy, Jim Craw, .Garvie
Berline, who impressed Elliott in Curtis, Thomas
spring practices. Berlin's chief *Dayton, Joseph (Ca
rival is Tom Pullen, a top tight Dyean, David
end prospect last year until he Denzin, David
hurt his knee and underwent an e ,
D'Eramo, Paul
Doane, Thomas
Doty, Alfred
Dremann, Peter
Duffy, James
Falkenhagen, Curt
tszH a Faarabee, David
Federico, Eric
k .Francis, Alan
Frysinger, Terry
Gabler, John
Garrison, Jeff
Goodman, Richard
*'Goss, Thomas
Hall, Werner
Hankwitz, Michael
Harris, William
*Hartman, Gerald
Healey, Brian
Heffelfinger, Jon
Hoey, George
=*Humphries, Derrick
Jobe, Thomas
*Johnson, Paul
*Johnson, Ronald
Jones, Joseph
Kieta, Robert
Kramer, Jon
Knsa, Joseph
Lambright, David
Loud, Bernard
Lukz, Joseph
Lynch, John
*Mair, Peter
Mandick, James
Mandler, Jay
Marley, James
*Miklos, Gerald
FLE ~A IN Minkoff, Lawrence
Monthei, Dennis
g quarterback, is caught in ac- *Morgan, Dennis
victory over the Wolverines last Mouch, William
n's Dick Vidmer as starting sig- Nelson, Douglas
ol in Greensburg, Pa. Parks, Richard
Penksa, Robert
The fourth game of the season *Phillips, Raymond
brings the Wolverines to the Big Pierson, Barry
Ten, and this year the baptism Pniewski, Richard
will be a fiery one: Michigan *Porter, David
State, complete with press notices Prusiecki, John
and reputation to uphold. With Pryor, Cecil
eight All-Americas gone, many ex- Prylr, Th
perts figure the Spartans to be a Pullen, Thomas
trifle less strong. But with the *Reynolds, John
likes of quarterback Jimmy Raye, Ritley, Robert
Bob Apisa and Todi Smith (Bub- Rice, Donald
ba's baby brother) around, the *Rosema, Roger
Green Giants are still the class Sansom, Elijah
of the Big Ten. Add end Al Bren- Sarantos, Peter
ner and guard Toni Conti, both Schwartz, Thomas
All-America prospects, as well as Seymour, Philip
halfbacks Dwight Lee and out- Sharemet, John
standing sophomorerL a m a r rShare, Ern
Thomas, tackle Joe Przbycki and 'Sharpe, Ernest
safety Jess Philips, and the Spar- *Sipp, Warren
tans look unbeatable. But Play- Sirosky, Dennis
boy, who thinks it knows some- Sorenson, Eric
thing, predicts an 8-2 record. Any Spencer, Royce
takers? Stead, John
For the Tenth Time *Stincic, Thomas
Next comes Indiana, in the Takach, Thomas
throes of what is politely called a Tackett, Richard
"rebuilding" .year. Several back- Thomas, John
field returnees should help, but
the Hoosiers are generally predict- Tiggleman, Cornelus
ed to be second division finishers. Titas, Frank
The end of October will find *Vidmer, Richard
thn WinXVpinc ha'.1r - T 'i++1. Waham Timthv

pt.)

Pos.
G
OT
HB
OG
DHB
OE
DHB
OT
QB
G
G
HB
QB
C
QB
OT
C
LB
DHB
FB
OG
FB
OHB
FB
G
T
RB 6
E
HB
T
T
SE
SE
DHB
QB
DE,
OHB
OE
HB
DT
HB
G
QB
DE
OE
T
E
T
DHB
OT
E
G
G
MG
E
MG
LB
DHB
DHB
E
OT
OT
QB
E
DT
T
LB
OE
FB
T
OE
DE
DHB
C
OHB
OE
E
OHB
OE
LB
QB
OE
G
DE
T
OT
QB
HB
HB
QB
HR

Ht.
5-11
6-0
5-8
6-0
5-11
6-0
5-11
6-0
5-10
6-1
5-10
6-2
6-1
6-2
5-10
6-2
5-10
5-10
5-10
6-0
6-1
6-2
6-0
5-11
5-10
6-2
-3 i
6-1
5-11
6-2
6-0
6-2
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-2
5-10
6-2
6-0
6-0
6-1
6-0
6-0
6-3
6-0
5-10
5-10
6-2
5-10
6-4
6-3
6-1
6-1
6-1'
6-0
6-2
5-11
6-0
6-0
6-1
6-1
6-3
6-0
6-2
6-3
6-2
6-4
6-3
5-10
6-0.
6-3
6-2
6-1
6-0
6-1
6-4
6-2
5-11
6-1
6-0
6-0
6-1
5-8
6-3
6-0
6-3
6-1
5-10
6-2
6-1
6-1

Wt.
185
218
180
210
190
192
173
230
175
215
220
215
182
230
170
225
208
207
195
220
215
200
185
200
190
210
210
195
175
225
225
190
185
170-
165
203
170
190
178
231
192
195
181
213
207
250
155
210
180
233
215
192
210
225
185
198
230
270
180
200
225'
228
165
200
238
245
230
198
218
228
207
214
188
200
199

Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Jr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph.
Soph.
Soph.
Soph.
Sr.
Soph.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Sr.
Soph.
Soph.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.
Soph.
Soph.
Soph.
Jr.
Sr. .
Soph.
Soph.
Soph.
Jr.
Soph.
Sr.
Sr.
Soph.
Sr.
Soph.
Jr.
Sr.
Soph.
Soph.J
Sr.
Soph.
Soph.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Soph..
Soph.'

I

Class Home Town

Ypsilanti
Detroit
Cincinnati, O,
Chicago, I1.
Fremont, O.
Niles, O.
Cincinnati, O.
Cincinnati, 0.
Lincoln Park
Auburn
Melrose Park, IlL.
Montclair, N. J.
Aurora, 0.
Detroit
Ann Arbor
Xenia, O.
Youngstown, 0.
Wauseon, 0.
Mt. Morris
Rydal, Pa.
Winchester, Mass,
Saginaw
Holland
Trenton
Cleveland, 0.
Ecorse
Royal Oak
Wyandotte
Detroit
Knoxville, Tenn.
Sandusky, 0.
Scottsville
Mt. Clemens
Ann Arbor
Sandusky, O.
Battle Creek
Flint
Detroit
Toledo, O.
Bay City
Detroit
Evanston, 111.
Chicago, Ill.
Toledo, O.
W. Braddoek, Pa.
Hillsdale
Birmingham
Niles, O.
Chicago, Ill.
Allentown, Pa.
Solon, 0.
Deerfield, Il.
Dearborn
Chicago, Il.
St. Louis, Mo.
Detroit
Phoenixville, Pa.
Cincinnati, O.
Adrian
Birmingham
Niles, O.
Evanston, 111
St. Ignace
Manchester
East Lansing
E. Chicago, Ind.
Corpus Christi
Ottawa, Canada
Grosse Pte. Wds.
Garfield Hts., O.
Detroit
Grand Rapids
Detroit
Elkhart, Ind.
Jr. Adrian

The Southland will send the
first contingent into vast Michi-
gan Stadium, as Duke's Blue Dev-
;;ils venture out of their Durham,
N.C., homeland in a rare trip
northward. The cigarette indus-
try's main collegiate representa-
tives are aiming to improve on
last year's 5-5 record, and al-
BOB APISA ready will have had a game un-
der their belts before engaging
Michigan.
Duke Coach Tom Harp can call
upon All-America center candidate
Mike Murphy, fullback Jay Cele-
brese, or 14 other regulars from
27 returning lettermen. Celebrese,
who already has 19 touchdowns to
his credit, should carry the brunt
Accompanying Volk on the Colts of a thundering running attack.
is Jim Detwiler, Big Ten leader After the smell of magnolias has
in kickoff returns and second- departed from Michigan Stadium,
leading scorer. "Detwiler started the Wolverines head due west to
off fine in training camp but he's l!Berkeley. California has picked
had problems lately with the same 4 up 23 outstanding junior college
knee injury that plagued him at transfers, but has a schedule that
Michigan," Hulmes stated. includes Notre Dame, UCLA and
Diesel Syracuse, all Top Ten-bound, ac-
Detwiler remains on the 49-

ILLINI RI

BOB NAPONIC, Illinois' starting
tion as the Illini claimed a 28-21

year. Naponic succeeded Michiga
nal caller at Hempfield High Sch
cording to preseason predictions.
Twenty-one returning lettermen,
including 14 starters, plus a good
sophomore crop, should help the
Golden Bears in their attempt to
avenge last year's 17-7 -loss to
Michigan. But it may not be
easily. They will have been in
South Bend, Ind.-Irish territory
-a week earlier.
Anchors Aweigh
Navy's Midshipmen will be the
next team to travel to Ann Arbor.
Coach Bill Elias will be looking
for his first winning season at
the Academy, and the return of
nine offensive starters should help.
Yet the Middies have been held
to one TD or less 10 times in the
past 20 games.

A
ar
ea

By JOEL BLOCK
Twenty-two Michigan football
players ended their collegiate ca-
reers last year but over one-third
may get a chance to enter the pro
football wars this fall.
Eight Wolverine greats - Jack
Clancy, Rick Volk, Jimn Detwiler,
Carl Ward, Frank Nunley, John
Rowser, Stan Kemp and Mike Bass
--all find their names on pro
rosters before the teams make
their final cuts in the next two
weeks.
Volk, All-America defensive
halfback in his senior year at
Michigan, has nailed down the
most secute position-an out-right
starting berth on the Baltimore
Colts.
Vank Win. Is h

c
f
i
t
s
A
r
t
4
} t
t
}
t.

200 Soph. Berkley

player squad which must be trim-
med to 40 in two weeks. He was
picked in the second round ofgthe
combined NFL-AFL draft, right
- 'behind the Colt's two first-round
picks-Volk and MSU's Bubba
:r.Smith.
All-America end Jack Clancy
set the Wolverine record for pass
receptions and Miami Dolphin
nublicity director Charlie Callahan

1967 Football Schedule
SEPTEMBER

193
191
216
197
185
208
210
217
195
227
192
165
210
185
1 5

Soph. Ann Arbor
Sr. Palos Hts., Ill.
Jr. Akron, O.
Jr. Chicago, Ill.
Soph. Royal Oak
Sr. Chicago, 111.
Soph. Flint
Jr. Cleveland, O.
Soph. Detroit
Jr. Kalamazoo
Sr. Walled Lake
Soph. Grand Rapids
Soph. Cleveland, O.
Sr. Greensburg, Pa.
Sonh. Ann Arhn

23
30

DUKE
California

HOME
Berkeley

OCTOBER

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