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August 31, 1967 - Image 123

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGZ

Riots: The Apartheid Perspective

(Continued from Page 2)
gry and hardly pacific mood
among the mourners who packed
the churchyard and stood for
hours in an 80-degree winter sun.
While he lived, Luthuli headed
the now-banned African National
Congress (ANC). Although the
Congress had been driven under-
ground and its leaders serve life
sentences in the desolate Robbin
Island prison, its spirit reappeared
publicly for the first time in years.
Tearful columns of men and wor-
en dressed in hastily assembled
black and green uniforms shouted
old ANC sliogans and sang songs
with considerable gusto. Carrying
green and black ANC flags, many
stood for hours with their fists
poised in the organization's
thumbs-up salute. Shouts of "Am-
anahla" (strength) and "Uhuru"
(freedom) echoed throughout the
narrow valley.
One African, unnamed in the
program, commandeered the mic-
rophone and delivered a passion-
ate political speech in Zulu. The
crowd loved it and more than 20
plainclothed security policemen
winced while carefully taping and
photographing the event.
Hundreds of tributes to Luthuli
were acknowledged. Several con-
sulates sent wreathes and the
American consul slowly recited
his well-composed remarks while
CBS-TV recorded them for do-
mestic consumption. But the more
interesting , and sincere oratory
came from Luthuli's colleagues -
his fellow ministers, chiefs, teach-
ers, and political leaders. The
most rousing and elloquent talk
was delivered by Alan Paton, au-
thor of "Cry the Beloved Coun-
try." His address brought smiles
and vocal assent from the crowd,
which hung on every word.
"I am not allowed by some fool-
ish law to tell you what he said,"
Paton began, "but I can tell you
what. he did . .. he fought for the
rights of the poor and dispossess-
ed. He was banned but history
cannot be banned.
"History will say that a noble
voice was silenced when it would
have been better for all if it had
been heard. . . . They took away
his freedom but he never ceased
to be free."
The response to Palon's talk
was evidence of a deep dissatis-
faction and yearning among the

tension and non-white discontent
is the reality. Although no radi-
cals in South Africa seem optimis-
tic about revolutionary action in
the near future - most of the;
whites and non-whites I spoke to!
seemed gripped by a sense of de-
spair-the existing tension and
restlessness might well be ignited'
by any one of what are undoubt-
edly inevitable but unpredictable
incidents. (Americans would do
well to remember that Detroit had
the best race relations record of
any city in America. It had man-
aged to avoid violence for years.
It was considered a model town.
Yet, its devastation, unpredicted
and unexpected, proved to be the
worst.)
Another eloquent voice at the
Luthuli funeral belonged to the
highly attractive 22-year-old
blonde daughter of a Johannes-
burg businessman. Extending the
condolences of at least some of
South Africa's white students, Miss
Margaret Marshall, the president
of the 20,000-member National
Union of South African Students
(NUSAS) made a bitter attack
on apartheid. Chief Luthuli had
been NUSAS's honorary president
for five years although the ban-
ning order prevented him from
having any contact with the stu-
dent organization. Besides a few
white ministers, pressmen, and se-
curity agents, NUSAS brought the
only contingent of whites to the
funeral.
"We have very little to look
forward to in South Africa," the
white president of the National
Union of South African students'
told the Luthuli funeral, "but we
do what we can and must."
These are not the kind of re-
marks one usually hears from a
student politician. They sound
tired and despairing when one ex-
spects inspiration or at least in-
flated self-importance. Margaret
IM-rshall admitted later she was
depressed "because the whole situ-
ation is so depressing."
Unlike student unions in some
countries which steer clear of
politics, NUSAS takes active polit-
ical stands and suffers the con-
s-quences. Last year, its president,
Ian Robertson, who is now stu-
dying in England, was banned.
And engaging and articulate per-
son, Miss Marshall has also been

Kenedy to the country for his student activities. Hoffenberg is
whirlwind four-day visit. Private- an adviser to NUSAS.
ly, NUSAS leaders were disap-' The response to his banning has
pointed by Kennedy's vagueness been volatile and immediate: a
and self-serving publicity antics poster vigil was begun on the steps
but his tour did generate a con- of a downtown church and mass
siderable nation-wide stir. staff-student rallies are planned.
B e s i d e s importing speakers, At the vigil, students carried signs
NUSAS has an ambitious, al-' marked with swastikas asking:
though financially starved, pro- "Where is the rule of law?" and
gram of student services, training 'Who Next?" Two girls carried
programs, and assistance to polit- !daffodils and help up posters re-
ical prisoners. Illegal on all Afri- peating the familiar American
can campuses, NUSAS is a multi- slogan, "A Free University in a
racial organization and has led Free Society." Protest against the
and supported student insurgency arbitrary banning are still mount-
on campuses throughout the coun- ing but with an unknown impact.
try. "NUSAS," one student leader3 Some whites think the govern-
who is currently banned on his ment went too far on this one, but
own campus told me, "is one of whether any change will be made
the few things you can do in remains to be seen.

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, 1967-1968
x*
Special Prea-Season Concerts
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC, LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Conductor
TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 and 13, 8:30 P.M.
in Hill Auditorium
TICKETS: $6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-52.00

,1

11

South Africa."
Partly because of NUSAS' prod-
ding but primarily because of in-
creasing government encroach-
ments on the universities, a new
spirit of revolt is' visible on South#
African campuses. One such out-
burst was ignited recently at the
University of Capetown in the
aftermath of the banning of an
internationally prominent profes-
sor of medicine. Dr. Raymond,
Hoffenberg, the country's top
gland specialist and author of
scientific articles, has been for-
bidden to publish or take part in

Student protest in this country
is limited by the same forces which
make student action expected and
ineffectual elsewhere. Students
have no decisive role in the econ-
omy or polity and their rebellions
are tolerated and ignored. Yet in
this country, student resistence
s e e m s destined to increase.
Whether it will take a political
direction or not-or whether there
is room for many post-student
radicals in South Africa-is de-
pendent on many non-student
forces and cannot be easily pre-
dicted.

Choral Union Series
(ins HittAuditorium)

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA....................
JEAN MARTI NON, Conductor
FRENCH NATIONAL ORCHESTRA, with EUGENE ISTOMIN, Pianist
VIENNA SYMPHONY ..................... .............. .
"CARMINA BURANA" - opera by Carl Orff ................. .
Expo '67 Production with Les Ballets Conadiens
CHRISTA LUDWIG, Mezzo-soprano .............,...........
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA OF LONDON ......... .
VACLAV NEUMANN, Conductor
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist .............................
HELSINKI PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA .....................
VAN CLIBURN, Pianist ....................................
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ........................
SEIJI OZAWA, Conductor

(2:30) Sunday, October

Monday,
.. Thursday,

October
October

(8:00) Sunday, October
.... Tuesday, October
Wednesday, January

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19
29
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Little card.
F--rnvenie ne.-
The's one reserved for you.
Pick it up today.
1112 South University

.......Monday, January 29
.. Saturday, February 24
. ....Friday, March 15
.......Thursday, March 28

SEASON TICKETS: $30.00-$25.00-$20.00-$15.00-$12.00
SINGLE CONCERTS: (counter sale begins September 11):
$6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-$2:00
Extra Series
(in Hitt Auditorium)
"LAND OF SMILES"-operetta by FRANZ LEHAR ..................Monday, S
(original Viennese production starring Giussepi di Stefano)
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA..............................Saturday, S
JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
YOMIURI JAPANESE ORCHESTRA.... .. .......................Friday, N
ARTHUR FI EDLER, Conductor
NATIONAL BALLET from Washington, D.C. ...... ...................Wednesday,
STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA ......... ...... ..........Frid
ANTAL DORATI, Conductor

th-,,rnt.,+ ofi, j snf l attacks. in-.

non-whites. The non-white major- timidation,nand constant surveil-
ity, divided as it is by ethnic, lance by security police.
tribal and cultural barriers, are
the victims of a complex system In its 43-year history, NUSAS
of control. Although a number of has always been ,an active and
blacks collaborate with the sys- 'liberal voice in a conservative '
tem to their personal advantage millieu. Some years ago, some of
and many others have accom- its leaders were implicated in al-
modated themselves in countless leged sabotage efforts; and most
ways, the spirit of resistance is everything it does invites extremej
still alive. Whatever the world is rightwing attacks and controversy.
told by South Africa's slick and Itw as a cause celebre last year
clever information services, racial because it invited Senator Robert

eptember 25
eptember 30
November 10
January 24
ay, March 8

A

0O o

Are you thinking about a new checking account?
With the move to college, comes a move of the finances.
And like everyone else, you want the most for your
money. We believe students deserve the best possible
service along with it.
As far as getting the most for your money, we offer you

the ThriftiCheck account. With ThriftiCheck, you only
pay 10ยข per check. No other charge for the account -
no matter what balance you maintain.
Before you get settled in Ann Arbor for the year, see
Huron Valley to settle your finances.
And pick up a free apple on your way out.

SEASON TICKETS: $15.00-$12.50-$10.00-$7.50-6.00
SINGLE CONCERTS (counter sale begins September 11):
$6.00-$5.50-$5.00-x4.00-$3.00-$2.00
Chamber Arts Series
(in Rackhan. Auditorium)
CHAMBER SYMPHONY OF PHILADELPHIA .............. ..........Saturday, October2
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Conductor
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC OCTET .................................. Sunday, November
BERLINER CAMERATA MUSICALE ................................Monday, November1
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY ................ ..................Saturday, January2
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO (vocal and instrumental) .............(2:30) Sunday, February
MUNICH CHAMBER ORCHESTRA ..................... . ........Thursday, February2
SAN PIETRO ORCHESTRA OF NAPLES .............. ..... . ............. Friday, March2
SEASON TICKETS: $20.00-$15.00-$10.00
SINGLE CONCERTS (counter sale begins September 11):
$5.00-$4.00-$2.00
Sixth AnnualDance Festival
(in Hill Auditorium)
HARKNESS BALLET.............................................. Friday, October1
Company of young dancers from New York in a program of classical and contem-
porary ballet
OLAETA BASQUE FESTIVAL OF BILBAO ..... . ........... . .....(2:30) Sunday, October1
First American tour of this colorful group in a pageantry of songs and dances of
the Basque country.
JOSE MOLINA BAILES ESPANOLES .................... ..............Friday, October
Spanish Dance Company in a program of classical and folk dances, and flamenco.
SERIES TICKETS: $8.00-$6.00-$5.00
SINGLE PERFORMANCES: $4.00-$3.00-$2.00
Christmas Music
(in Hill Auditorium)
"MESSIAH" (HANDEL) -Three Performances .......................Friday, December
University Choral Union, and Saturday, December
Members of Interlochen Arts Academy Orchestra ...........(2:30) Sunday, December
TICKETS: $2.50-$2.00-$1.50-$1.00 (Counter sale begins October 10)

21
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13
20
4
29
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HURON VALLEY
National Bank... ./0k1,4,/k9Rl1
WASHINGTONI' AT FIFTH AVE.
WA.NTEN'.V AT HURN PARKWAY

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