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August 31, 1967 - Image 116

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The Michigan Daily, 1967-08-31

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, AUGUST 31,1967"

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1987

Controversy

Rocks

USSPA

Congress

'U' Assembly Adopts Proposal
To Expand Senate Membership

By WALLACE IMMEN ovation at the conclusion of the
The United States-Student Press Week-long convention.
Association has maintained a pol- haFivbeen defeate bhoweve eBlo
icy of avoiding involvement in terson of the University of Den-
politics. But last week, in the ver, a former ally of Bloom and
sixth annual Congress of the Stu- 'the Congress threatened to break
dent Press, held at the University into twogseparate organizations.
of Minnesota, the body of USSPA Fortunately, the inception of the
was up to its neck in a major poli- New Press Project wire service to
tical controversy centering arounid complement USSPA's Collegiate
the approval of its new general Press Service healed much of the
secretary and its handling of the wound, but the back room deal-
NSA-CIA affair. ing and in-fighting of the sixth
The delegates heard Dick Greg- Congress will long be remembered.
ory, independent candidate for The delegates, most of whom
president in 1968, laud the im- had been completely in the dark
portance of the student press in to this point, were told that the
changing society and listened in- Bloom selection had been rescind-
tently to Paul Krassner, editor ed by a 5-3 vote of the NEB. The
of Realist Magazine as he describ- reasons given for the rejection
ed the means of fighting jour- were "nagging doubts of Bloom's
nalistic inertia. But underneath integrity" and the fact that the
the workshops and discussions was April meeting which chose him
a tension matched only by a poli- was called without the proper two
tical convention. weeks' notice.
Marshall Bloom, a former edi- The plenary session focused on
tor from Amherst University, had Bloom's handling of the release of
been selected by the 12-man USS- notes taken by Larry Rubin, a
PA national executive board in member of the National Student
April, and as the delegates from Association, during the CIA con-
over 90 newspapers registered on troversy. They had been released
Sunday, August 19, it appeared to the Washington Free Press, an
that he would be seated with an underground paper, on an USSPA

letterhead. It was charged that the
notes should not have been releas-
ed on Bloom's word alone as they
undermined the NSA and injured
the chances of Ed Schwartz in
his bid for president of NSA.
Schwartz had been elected, and
since the delegates did not have
any more information, the Con-
gress overruled the NEB and gave
Bloom a vote of confidence for
the duration of the convention,
while holding the option to make
another recommendation at a la-
ter session.

In the meantime, the second
contingent, led by Rita Dershow-
itz, of Sarah Lawrence University,
convinced David Peterson to an-
nounce his candidacy for general
secretary. In the meantime, a pa-
per was being circulated which
attacked Bloom's political, finan-
cial and personal responsibility
and charged that he intended to
dictate USSPA policy.
By Friday afternoon, the issue
had been brought to a fever pitch
and following a brief debate be-
tween Peterson and Bloom, the

Congress recommended that the
NEB elect Peterson as general sec-
retary, rather than Bloom.
The vote was 41-32 and that
night a meeting of the dissenting
Bloom supporters decided in an
extended session to establish the
New Press Project, headed by
Bloom and Mungo, which evolved
into an alternative to the com-
mercial news wire services after
having first 'been envisioned as a
completely independent student
press association.

(continued from Page 1) dent Harlan Hatcher and the vice-
Kennedy said action was post- presidents with a view towards en-
poned because some members felt larging the study.

that the study should be expand-
ed to include closely-related ques-
tions, such as some provisions of
the legislative act appropriating
funds to the University.
Kennedy said that these "legal
restraints on the University are
alarming," and added that SACUA
will confer with University Presi-j

Underground Viet Student Movement
Increases Confusion on Political Scene

A few of the legislative provi-
sions raise questions of constitu-
tionality and represent "problems
the Legislature dumped on us."
according to Kennedy.
These provisions say that:'
-No new or expanded programs.
including any which might be fi-
nanced by gift or federal money,
may be established without legis-
lative approval.
-The University cannot sign
contracts for self-liquidating proj-
ects without legislative approval.
-There cannot be more than
a five per cent increase in non-
resident enrollment, and there can
be no increase if current non-
resident enrollment exceeds 20 per
cent of total enrollment.
-All overhead expense allow-
ances, regardless of source, shall
be considered in the same cate-

gory as fees or other income and
treated as a reduction from the
gross appropriation.
Kennedy said that the Assem-
bly presently has no firm basis
for judging the faculty opinion
on the trimester, although the in-
formal poll conducted this sum-
mer by the literary college indicat-
ed that the majority of the fac-
ulty opposed the trimester system.
No other school had conducted a
similar poll.
The Educational Policy Com-
mittee will study the trimester
question this year and incorpor-
ate the literary college poll data.
The Communications Media
Committee hopes to begin its
study of the communications me-
dia within the University soon
after Labor Day, although the two-
student members of the commit-
tee have not yet been appointed
by Student Government Council
and Graduate Assembly.

By WALLACE IMMEN
A student underground is the
real force on the Vietnamese cam-
puses, according to Alex Jack, a
student reporter from Oberlin
College who spent several months
among the students and civilians
of South Vietnam.
He said in a panel discussion at
the recent United States Student

Press Association convention that
most of the student organizers
have been paid off by the Na-
tional Liberation Front (NLF) and
are ordered to deliberately change
their views every few weeks to
create a chaotic picture of Viet-
namese youth movements.
Two other members of the panel
were Bob Browe, a correspondent

for the New Republic and Howie
Moffett, who recently covered'
Vietnamese politics for the Col-
legiate Press Service. They agreed'
that most commercial reporting
spends too much time covering the
tangible action of bombs and
deaths and avoid the war's in-
tangible effects on the Vietnam-
ese people.

_. _.

Browe said that more than half,
of the estimated 200 activists now
organizing Vietnamese students
will probably be assassinated by
the NLF in the coming year. "A
number have said they don't think
the cause is worth dying for,"
Browe explained, "and they are
now leaving the campuses out of
fear 'in order to hide in the vil-
lages.
"The people are fighting a war
against strangers," Moffet ob-
served. "When they see the force
being used by the Americans and
the Army of the Republic of Viet-
nam (ARVN) they are anxious
to get the protection of the NLF."
He said that those he had inter-
viewed found the Viet Cong "much
more polite" than the Americans.
Alex Jack, the only American
to talk to Thich Tri Quang, the
Buddhist non-violent leader, said
that the Buddhists are the leaders
of the underground and although
their demonstrations receive little
coverage in this country, they
have had a great impact in Viet-
nam. They have actually been the
only stable force in the country in
his estimation.

W.ELCOME

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN"

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibjilty. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not'
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 31
General Notices
Student Government Council Approval'
of the following student sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All pub-
licity for these events must be with-
held until the approval has become ef-
fective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
UAC, Social Committee, UAC Mad-

U..of

M.

Students

f

MICHIGAN'S Wolverines - Michigan's
famous Marching Band-The Victors-

- EN RE

State Street-The

League-The Union

- all

are great

traditions of a

great

University.

GREEN E'S CLEANERS is a
forty-one years GREENE'S

tradition, too.

For

NAB'
r.,,
n/

ness, Aug. 30, 9-12 p.m., Palmer Field
tennis courts.
College Republican Club, Literature
distribution, sale of membership sale
of game, at registration booth outside
Waterman Gym, Aug. 28-30.
Michigan Rugby Football Club, Diag
and registration line area for recruit-
ing interest in the club, sell rugby
buttons at $,25, for financial support.
Aug. 28-30.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Local Organization-Layout Artist for
prep, of copy for lithographing.Art
and/or mech. thawing bkgd. Degree-
pref., not necessary.
S. & C. Electric Co., Cicago, Ill. -
Executive Assistant. MBA plus BSME
or BSEE to understudy mfg. div. supt.
Mfg. engrg., indus. engrg., prod. control.
Under 3 yrs. exper.
Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. -
Psychometrist with MS or PhD in
Psych., Psychometrics, or related area,
to plan, aimin. and evaluate all com-
pany testing programs.
Avco Corp., Richmond, Ind.-Editor-
Writer in Tech. Publications Dept.
Seek recent grad with major in Eng.,
Journ., Educ., Psych., eligible for se-
curity clearance. 6-mos. trng. program.
Jewish Vocational Service and Com-
munity Workshop, Detroit, Mich. -
Placement Counselor, degree in soc. sci.,
bus. ad., with exper. in sales, personnel
work, public relations, with handicap-
ped clients pref. Involves job develop-
ment and ° placement for mentally
handicapped clients.
County of Calhoun, Marshall, Mch
-Female Probation Officer for Juven-
ile Court. BA in Soc. or Soc. Work,
pref. MA or MSW.
Niles Public Library, Niles, Mich. -
Children's Librarian to head autono-
mous children's dept. Also act as read.
er's advisor, do weekly radio program,
conduct pre-school story hours. MA in
Lib. Sci.
For further information please cal
764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 SAB.
ORGANIZATION
- NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Rm. 1011 SAB.
Baha'i Student Group plans an infor-
mal discussion on "What is the Baha'i
Faith" on Sept. 2 at 8 p.m. at 520
Ashley. Transportation offered if you
call 662-3548.
Judicial Working Committee of the
Presidential commission on Decision
Making holds an open meeting on Fri.,
Sept. 1, at 1 p.m. in Room 3529 of the
SAB.
OPEN
SUNDAY, September 3
7:30 P.M.
The Film
"America, On Edge
of Abundance"
Singing
Fun & Games
All students are invited.
Presbyterian Campus Center
1432 Washtenaw
HOUSE

4'

CLEANERS have

given the best in dry cleaning and shirt launder-
ing to thousands of Michigan students. In fact,
many alumni around the country still send gar-
ments to us for special cleaning services.
In Ann Arbor, GREENE'S have four convenient
locations and six routes to service the quad-

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rangles, dormitories, ,sororities,

fraternities

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apartments and rooming houses. At the infor-
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find a GREENE'S card to fill out and attach to

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also find a place to

leave garments for

GREENE'S

daily pick-up

service. There is no additional charge for pick-up
and delivery.
THE PICK-UP AND DELIVERY SERVICE on dry
cleaning and shirt lanudering takes three days.
For same-day service, take your garments to any
of GREENE'S cleaning plants.

USTIN DIAMOND
"WHERE MARGINAL PRICES
BUY QUALITY DIAMONDS"
1209 S. UNIVERSITY

ATTENTION
STUDENT WIVES:

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN offers a wide
selection of excellent opportunities for full-time,
permanent employment. Choose from a variety of
interesting and rewarding positions including:
* OFFICE (Secretarial-Clerical)
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* MEDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS
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* OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
l LABORATORY TECHNOLOGISTS
These positions are in a variety of academic, re-
search, patient care, and administrative units Il-

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