100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 14, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 14, 1968

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JANUARY 14,1968

Defeat
(Continued from Page 1)
so I benched him at the start.
I don't think he could have played
too much longer out there today.
He's too weak physically."
Fortunately f a r Benington,
whose defending Big Ten co-
champions are now 1-1 *.- the
conference, Edwards played just
long enough.
After his lay-up, most of the
12,470 fans filed montonously out.
The game ends.
Benington did not, however.
heap globs of glowing praise on his
players in his post-game locker-
room bastion.
Listens Well
"Vern Johnson listens well .
after he's sitting down," he began.
"And, you know, with a six-
point lead and 21 seconds left, Gus
(assistant coach Gus Ganakas)
says, 'I think we still can blow
it.' I thought we could too .
tip one in at their basket or WOI
something," he added. gan
"Anyway, this keeps us alive to t
for awhile, at least," he concluded. tt
Strack put his arm around the Stew
grieving Pitts as he left the lock-
erroom trying to replace the sick-
ness and fear with courage and Tomj
faith because there are still Mccle
Stewai
many games to go. Maxey
But as he returned to the clus- Pitts
ter of reporters, he stopped for Bmoodv
a brief second and spoke, half- suiiiv,
aloud and half to himself, "It Henry
isn't much fun." Tota

Sends

Cagers

to

Basement

TIRE VANDALS
AND THE
BR1OKEN IIADS
.Dave Weir

*

*

*

*

*

*

Iowa Stops OSU in Overtime

It's Time For a Change

*

By The Associated Press
IOWA CITY, Iowa - Iowa
stormed from 13 points behind in
the last half and used Ron Nor-
man's basket with three seconds
left to nip Ohio State 74-72 in
overtime of a Big Ten basketball
game here yesterday.
The Hawkeyes, down 40-29 at
halftime, used a tenacious press
to take a 64-62 lead in the closing
seconds of regulation play.
But Ohio State's Denny Mea-
dors was fouled just before the
buzzer sounded, then hit a pair
of free throws to send the game
into the extra session.
Iowa built a 72-68 lead in the
overtime, but Jim Geddes swiped
the ball from the Hawks twice
in a few seconds span, scoring
once himself and feeding to Bill
Hosket for the other basket, to
tie it 72-72 with 54 seconds to go.
However, a few secondshlater
Hosket missed two free throws,
and with 24 seconds to go, Iowa
took control when a Buckeye bad
pass went out of bounds.
Norman hit the winning shot
on a 20-foot jumper from the top

Sam Williams scored 32 pointsI Randy Crews sank a basket with
as Iowa boosted its record to 7-5 1:55 left for a 58-58 tie.
and 1-1 in Big Ten play. Ohio Tom Kondla tipped in a missed
State, 7-3 and 1-1, got a 26-point free throw with a minute to go;
showing out of Hosket. giving Minnesota a 60-58 lead.'
* * *Then Scholz sank a free throw
-~ ~ ~ *with 40 seconds remaining. That

Indiana 6hoi uown

LVERINE GUARD JIM PITTS smashes through two Michi-
State defenders to take a shot during yesterday's 86-81 loss
he Spartans. Pitts scored 20 points, as did teammate Dennis
vart. Rudy Tomjanovich led Michigan with 21.

MICHIGAN

MICHIGAN STATE

anovich
elan
trt
worth
an

G FT
10-16 1-1
0-1 1-1
8-17 5-7
4-11 6-8
6-9 8-17
1-3 0-2
0-0 1-1
0-1 1-2

R
13
1
5
3
10
1
3
2
45

P
5
2
3
4
4
3
2
0
23

T
21
I
21
14
20
2
1
1
81

Copeland
Geistler
Lafayette
Holms
Bailey
Johnson
Gibbons
Edwards
Ward
Totals

G FT
4-8 4-5
2-7 0-2
9-16 3-7
3-10 2-2
7-11 2-2
0-0 0-1
3-10 1-2
8-11 2-4
0-0 0-1
36-73'14-27

R
s
5
15
3
3
0
4
4
50

P
5
4
5
4
2
2
1
2
26

IT
12
4
21
8
16
0
7
18
0
86

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - Trail-
ing throughout most of the game,
Northwestern's Wildcats overtook
Indiana in the final 2% minutes
last night to score its second
straight Big Ten victory 86-81.
The victory gave the Wildcats
a 2-0 conference record and left
them 8-4 overall. Indiana is 2-1
in league play, 8-4 on the season.
Sophomore Dale Kelley's sharp-
shooting from the field and sup-
erior team free-throw shooting
were big factors in the North-
western win. Kelley counted 32
points, and the Wildcats, out-
scored from the field, hit 30 of
their 40 free throws.
Six minutes into the second half
Indiana led 62-46, but with three
men each carrying four fouls
scored only three points to North-
western's 19 in the next 7% min-
utes.
Illi Sneak By
MINNEAPOLIS - Dave Scholz
drilled a short turn-around jump
shot with seven seconds left last
night, lifting Illinois to a 61-60
Big Ten basketball victory over
Minnesota.
Scholz' basket capped an Illin-
ois comeback which saw the vic-
tors wipe out a nine-point sec-
ond-half deficit. Minnesota led
34-27 at halftime and 36-27 early
in the second half.
Illinois didn't catch up until

4onference

set the sage for a helter-skelter
windup with Scholz finally grab-
bing the ball and poking through
the winning field goal.
Scholz led Illinois with 26
points and Crews added 14. Le-
Roy Gardner topped Minnesota
with 15 and Kondla had 12.
Minnesota led 34-24 in re-
bounds, and outshot Illinois 47
per cent to 43 per cent.

Big Ten Standings

Ovt

I

W L Pet. Wi
Northwestern 2 0 1.000 7
Indiana 2 1 .667 8
Illinois 2 1 .667 6
Ohio State 1 1 .500 7
wisconsin 1 1 .500 7
IOwa 1 1 .500 6
Michigan State 1 1 .500 5
Purdue 1 - .500 6
Minnesota 1 1 .500 3
MICHIGAN 0 2 .000 4
Yesterday's Results
Miichigan state 86, Michigan 81
Illinois 61, Minnesota 60
Iowa 74, Ohio State 73
Northwestern 86, Indiana 81

verall
r4
t4
i 6
r 3
r4
;5
39
47

ais 29-59 23-39

of the key.

s

AVOID APARTMENT HANG-UP$
Ask for the NEW 1968
University 8-month lease
when renting Ann Arbor
apartments for Fall 1968!,
SHA
the lease will be available Jan. 15th, 1968

Student or Teacher
to do library
research at University
of Michigan Library
Prefer library science major,
$3.00 per hour.
Write M.I.S., P.O. Box 5129,
Grosse Pointe, Michigan 48236

SCORES
NHL
Montreal 5, Boston 1
Toronto 7, Pittsburgh 0
New York 3, St. Louis 1
Chicago 4, Detroit 4, tie
Oakland 2, Minnesota 2, tie
N BA
Cincinnati 122, San Diego 116
Philadelphia 115, Detroit 106
Chicago 110, Baltimore 106

There is a well-entrenched belief ingrained in Michigan athletic
structure that it is necessary.
There is a similar widespread feeling among football coaches
that becoming athletic director at Michigan or anywhere else would
bs a move "upward" on the sports ladder.
Indeed, it is generaly accepted in most sports circles that athle
directorships and sports administrations really do have something
to do with winning and losing football games.
What a bunch of crap.
If there ever was any relation between the sweat and grime of the
football field or the basketball court or the trampoline and the build-
ing on the corner of State and Hoover Streets, it has long since been
lost in the bureaucratic maze and blue which characterizes Mchigaxs
modern superstructure.
The intricacies of today's political frankenstein defy accurate
description. The NCAA, the AAU, the USTFF, the Olympic com-
mittees, the Boards in Control of Collegiate Athletics at every
university across the country. . . these have proliferated to such
an extent that the mind is baffled when it tries to deiniate the
functions of each.
The plain, simple truth is that all of these sewing circles and
bridge clubs have nothing to do with collegiate athletics. Rather they
are the playthings developed by ex-athletes and ex-coaches and alumni
and faculty who need somebody and something to manipulate.
The lines of communication between the gridiron grass and the
dining room conferences have become so clogged that even an over-
whelming dose of weed-killer could only temporarily clean up the me@
And without a doubt, the political ugliness would spring right back
up again anyway. \
Perhaps the most obnoxious aspect of the whole situation is the
self-righteous secrecy of most administrators, especially here at Mich-
igan.
Why doesn't the public have a right to know who is in the
running for athletic director? Not because it would have anything
to do with the choice of a new dictator, but because it's part of
the game to play "politics" behind closed doors in whispers and
winks.
Personally, I find the entire game a little sickening, and would
like to prescribe a new set of rules.
First of all, it is obviously too late to save college athletics from
the tentaclistic grasp of perverted professionalism, but hopefully, thee
is still some chance that the student body at large can be spared
from its murky influence.
President Fleming has said that the appointment of H. 0. Crisler's
successor as czar will be delayed until the Regents act upon a proposal
to re-organize the athletic structure.
Under the proposed plan, physical education and intramu i~s
would no longer fall under the direct control of the Athletic Boas
This plan deserves the wholehearted support of every student
at Michigan. Why let a remote and unresponsive group of alumni
and administrators dictate the conditions under which we enjoy
individual participation in amateur sports?
The fact is that they don't give a damn about us. Witness that,
in his 28 years as athletic director, Crisler has completed (with the
opening of the Events Building) 11 of his 12 original projects. T
only one which never did and never will receive adequate consider-
ation is, in Crisler's own words, "the one for the students."
This entails expansion of the ridiculously-inadequate intramural
facilities into some semblance of a semi-comprehensive program,
which would allow average students the right to remain physically fit.
And that's all there is to it! Simply an appropriation for the stu-
dents. How absurd!
But there are no funds for doing anything for the students,
because it is profitless. This is why Crisler's Board, the Regents
the faculty senate, all the various vice-presidents and (up until
now) the president, have not fulfilled their responsibility to the
student body.
None of these people can effect a change alone. And nobody
knows where whose authority starts or ends.
Thus it is time for a basic change.
Intramurals and physical education do not belong under the
"partial jurisdiction" of the Athletic Board, or the Regents, or the
faculty senate, or any other quasi-representative group.
Instead the students need an active and dynamic voice in the
area of physical education and recreation. The bureaucracy has shown
that it doesn't care about the students, so it is now our responsibility
to initiate a new system of control.I
No longer can the intramural directors be expected to rely on
"excess funds" from the athletic corporation in order to function.
Appropriations must come from the University General Fund, and
they must be administrated by a board without other duties or respon-
sibilities.
The rest of the administrators will kindly stick to their
whispers and dollar sign. We-the students-want to play basket- '
ball.

SPEAKING OF HOWE -
SPEAK WITH HOWE
informally, during office hours
10:00 A.M. - NOON
Tuesday, January 16
Thursday, January .18
Tuesday, January 23
for appointments, call Carol: 769-0225
I RVING HOWE
WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE Jan. 15-28
a a a a a a a a a a~a a ~ a

1 §
§
§
§
§
ti §
§
S leShoes, Clothing
§
and Furnishings i
at .Reductions of
20% r more.
j§{
Ja/~ §
Ladies' Sale
also in pr§rs.
} §
§ §
All iteCs chosen for this sale are frorour
e regular stocks. They represen t e xcellen t val-
ues and are reduced for quick clearance. §
at9Redutions o

GET YOUR NEW CARD FOR '68
* Fill out application below. Bring it to our store and receive
your discount card absolutely free, entitling you to 10% DIS-
COUNT for the rest of the year.I
FREE 10O DISCOUNT CARD
<> .------------- APPLICATION BLANK--------------
NAME ._______ _
ADDRESS1
S I _I_____________ F
I I
CItTY PHONE-
10% SAVINGS ON ALL Cough and Cold Remedies - Dental
Needs-Cosmetics-Toiletries-Hair Preparations-Baby Sup-
plies-First Aid Needs-Clocks-Watches-Razors-Vitamins
and many other items.
MARSHALL'S CUT RATE
M R ~ DRUG STORE
235 S. State St. Ann Arbor 662-1313
999 CLIP COUPON n, r QS CLIP COUPON VVQ
Reg. $1.65 Reg. $1.79
BARNES-HINDS= TAMA4's
T Wetting Solution $1.
99C $1e33
<t>Limit One with a Coupon' Limit One with a Coupon '~ -
Coupons Expire Jan. 20 Coupons Expire Jon. 20.
CLIP COUPON 99CLIP COUPON ;v t
># s, , r Q Ra_ 5.89 raj

r

ALPHA KAPPA PSI

Professional Business Fraternity
invites
Undergraduate and Graduate
Business and Econ Students
to
RUSH SMOKER
at

406 Packard
7:30-9:00 p.m.

Jan. 15 or 16
and Jan. 17

L.

Gm-

----m

UNIVERSITY CHARTER FLIGHTS

Detroit-London-Detroit
May 9-June 20-6 weeks $205
Maq 20-Aug. 19--13 weeks $230
seats now limited
June 27-Aug. 23-8 weeks $250

i

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan