100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 12, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Friday, April 12, 19t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday~April 12, 1 9~ THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Three

Reject Warsaw
For Talks Site

WASHINGTON (MJ-The United
States balked yesterday at a
North Vietnamese proposal for
meetings in Warsaw, saying it
prefers a neutral site rather than
the capital of Communist Poland.
The White House complained,
too, about what it portrayed as
Communist efforts to score prop-
aganda points in the jockeying
over where to hold peace-talk pre-
liminaries.
And it invited Hanoi to respond
instead to an earlier U.S. propo-
sition to get discussions going in
a non-aligned locale such as-Bur-
ma, India, Indonesiator Laos.
Warsaw was not finally ruled
out but the United States obvious-
ly will try hard for another site.
Presidential p r e s s secretary
George Christian set forth the
current U4S. stance after the of-
ficial Soviet news agency Tass
first disclosed North Vietnam's
newest site offer.
The failure of the opposing sides
to agree on a location so far, more
than a week after they publicly
announced a readiness to talk,
foreshadowed even greater diffi-
culties for any real negotiations
on ending the Southeast Asian
conflict.
Christian said the U.S. govern-
ment received a diplomatic mes-
sage from Hanoi proposing War-
saw as the meeting place only
after it had first read the item
in a Tass dispatch.
"The United States government
has proposed a number of neu-
tral countries as possible sites for
contacts and we have not yet
had any response to this pro-
posal," the White House spokes-
man said. He added:
"On serious matters of this kind
it is important to conduct talks in
a neutral atmosphere fair to both
sides."
"The selection of an appropri-
ate site in neutral territory with
adequate communications facili-
ties should be achieved promptly

seek to make this a matter of
propaganda.'
After U.S. rejection of an ear-
lier Hanoi suggestion that the
preliminary talks be held at
Phnom Penh,-the Cambodian cap-
ital, Tass commented pointedly
that Johnson has said U.S. repre-
sentatives would go anywhere,
anytime to discuss peace.
In his March 31 speech an-
nouncing a slow-down in U.S.
bombing of North Vietnam in a
bid for negotiations, Johnson said:
"Now, as in the past, the United
States is ready to send its repre-
sentatives to any forum, at any-
time, to discuss the needs of
bringing this ugly war to an end."
It is contended in Washington
that Johnson is not going back on
his word, but rather is pressing
for a "suitable place" in his objec-
tion to Hanoi's proposals to meet
at Phnom Penh or Warsaw.
Johnson Signs
Housing Bill
WASHINGTON (A) - President?
Johnson signed into law the civil
rights and open housing bill yes-
terday in a White House cere-
mony exactly one week after the
assassination of the Rev. Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. touched off
looting and rioting in slums across
the land.
"Now with this bill, the voice#
of justice speaks again," Johnson
told scores of civil rights leaders,
government officials, and mem-
bers of Congress who crowded the
East Room for the ceremony.

Cl.ifford
I}
'Reserve
WASHINGTON (A)-Secretary in the So
of Defense. Clark M. Clifford yes- halt, Clif
terday called up 24.500 reservists,'- "My ar
10,000 of whom will go to Viet- did order
nam under the first announced ing in N
reserve mobilization for the war. that they
The move will bring. the au- of it, the
thorized U.S. manpower ceiling in a policy
Vietnam to' 549,500, but Clifford would do
said the South Vietnamese Army not to c
is. being geared to take over the that is i
major part of the fighting. At ano
At the same time the new de- that "In1
fense chief indicated clearly the ing is s
implications of its partial halt to Vietnam
the bombing of North Vietnam as that they
well as the possibilities of a full tage it."
cessation. He woi
Effect on Talks about po
Clifford said he does not be- cause of
lieve North Vietnam will interpret as the d
the call-up as an escalation of the exists nov
war nor does he feel it will have an are takin
adverse effect on peace talks. ington a
However, Sen. Eugene J. Mc- About
Carthy said yesterday the call-up
"bears up the fact" that the ad-
ministration "is not handling
Vietnam right." The Minnesota ..B'
senator is seeking the Democratic
presidential nomination as anT
antiwar candidate.
The reserve call-up affects 88
Army, Navy and Air Force Reserve
and Guard units in 34 states. The SAIGO
men are being notified imme- South V
diately to report to duty within 30 cavalrym
days for up to 24 months service. day to r
Army Calls 20,000 outpost a
m4,., .~..._. .,T _.. C% ^^ ma rth d

Orders
C al-Up

uth during a full bombing
fford replied:
nswer would be that if we
a cessation of the bomb-
orth Vietnam and found
y were taking advantage
!n we would have to make
decision as to what we
in view of their decision
omply with the formula
n our minds."
other point Clifford said
the event that the bomb-
Moped entirely in North
. . we would assume
y would not take advan-
Lld not be more specific
ssible future actions "be-
what you will recognize
degree of sensitivity that
m regarding contacts that
ng place between Wash-
and Hanoi.",
10 days ago defense of-

ficials said an over all call-up
of 60,000 to 65,000 might be in
order in coming months, mainly
to bolster the nation's homebased
strategic reserve pool.
But of the 24,500 only about
14,500 will be used to beef up the
home-front forces. The implica-
tion is that perhaps no larger call-
up for this purpose may be neces-
sary.
On the administration's current
move to make peace with Hanoi,
Clifford said that after a "rather
halted beginning" the diplomatic
messages "are going back and
forth effectively."
Clifford wouldn't give his "pri-
vate opinion' on how the discus-
sions may turn out. But he said
he doesn't think the North Viet-
namese pullout from- threatening
positions around Khe Sanh is
linked to Hanoi's change of mind
toward negotiations.

ive To Recapture
ig Vei Repulsed

N UP) -With the rest of
ietnam quiet, U.S. air
en battled vainly yester-
reoccupy tl Khe Sanh
at Lang Vei, Where they
in mnnncd ha dia

I
1

i

The Army is calling 20,000 men
in 76 Guard and Reserve outfits.
The Navy is calling 1.000 in two
Reserve units which will rotate

The bill; on which the House between the United States and
completed Congressional action Southeast Asia.
Wednesday, makes it a federal The Air Force is mustering 3,500
crime to interfere with anyone try- in 10 Air .National Guard and Air
ing to exercise his civil rights. Force Reserve units. One third of
When fully effective in 1970 it these will go to Southeast Asia.

will outlaw discrimination i4. the

SUBSCRIBE NOW!

- DISCOUNTS !

. R.T.P. TICKET OFP CE ' .MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
OPEN WEEKDAYS =-10:00 TO 1 :00 AND 2:00 TO 5:00

f
3

- ...

* UNIVERSITY

through mutual agreement, and sale and rental or 80 per cento r
those acting in good faith will not the nation's housing units.
Take
Advantagehr
of the<
1,1 . .EASTER
HOLIDAY
to see
FINIAN'S RAINBOW
A Musical Fantasy
presented by
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
Tonight at 8:00 P.M.-
Special Easter Sunday Performance at 7:00 P.M.
SATURDAY SOLD OUT.
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
$2.00, $2.25, $2.50
Box Office (668-6300)
open 10 A.M. 'til curtain time -
r <. ": rk°" :: :\ :: t<:. :,.:" ~ .. ....',v'...",,+..:L. t- .+i"}..... &..... ti... ~........ :a:...Y. . .}.":x-: ::,a:::}:,

Aside from this "no decision has
been made at this time as to
whether additional reserve forces
will be called," Clifford said.
"We are starting on a new
course of action," Clifford declared
in his first formal news conference
since succeeding Robert S. McNa-
mara six weeks ago.
"The President has made an
offer to Hanoi to start a planned
program of de-escalation."
When asked where the United
States would allow North Vietnam
to continue supplying its forces

marcnea in unopposea te aay
before.
Three companies of the U.S.
1st Air Cavalry Division had re-
tired to a bivouac near Lang Vai
'Wednesday night, possibly because
they found the Special Forces
camp a charnel house of unburied
bodies from the fierce fighting
there in February.
-When the cavalrymen came
back in the morning as part of a
sweep to drive the ,North Vietnam
besiegers of Khe Sanh back across
the border they ran into a storm
of machine gun and rifle fire.
Occupy Ruined Bunkers
At least a company of North
Vietnamese, possibly, 80 men, had
occupied the trenches and ruined
bunkers of Lang Vei during the
night.
The cavalrymen pulled back,
and U.S. artillery and planes
blasted the camp that had been
left in ruins when North Viet-

namese tanks and troops over-
ran'it Feb. 7.
At least five North Vietnamese
were seen to. run from the bunk-
ers of Lang Vei to the safety of
a ridge to the west. Three times
the troopers tried to storm the
camp between artillery barrages,
but each time they were thrown
back.
Killed 'A Lot of Them'
Casualties on both sides were
not estimated, but Capt. Douglas
Verdier, commanding the cavalry
company, said: "We killed a lot
of them, T know."
Verdier thought the North
Vietnamese stand at Lang Veil was
to cover the retreat of their 325c
Division. toward the Laotian bor-
der two miles west of the camp.
This division and the North
Vietnamese 304th Division had
besieged Khe Sanh, four miles east
of Lang Vei, from Jana'ary until
a big allied drive broke up the
encirclement last week.
heflecting a lull which the U.S.
Command said had been develop-
ing for a month, the number of
American soldiers reported killed
last week was the lowest in 21
months..
,279 U.s.Dead
The . command said 279 U.S.
soldiers were killed and 3,190
wounded, compared with 330 kill-
ed and 3,886 wounded the week
before. South Vietnamese report-
ediy killed increased slightly to
407, compared with 393 the week
before. Vietnamese wounded to-
taled 1,479 compared with 1,160
the previous week.
The latest report lifted the total
casualty figure to 21,054 Ameri-
cans killed and 131,038 wounded
in action since Jan. 1, 1961. Tn the
same period, the total enemy kill-
ed was placed at 324,000.
The sweep of 100,000 allied
soldiers in 11 provinces around
Saigon was pressed against little
opposition for the fourth straight
day. The allies .are looking for
18,000-20,000 North Vietnamese
troops believed to be in the 3rd
Corps area.

''

2nd NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATIONs
SEASTERN THEATRES G E T F
GREAT o. VLL.6E
WE EK 37!|| No.MAPLE R.-769-1300

Mon-Thurs.
7:00-9:20

,tv

MUSICAL

SOCIETY

Friday-7:00-9:20-11:20; Sat.--3:00-5:00-7:10-9:20- 1:20
SUNDAY-1:00-3:00-5:00-7:10-9:20
WINNER TWO ACADEMY AWARDS
BEST ACTRESS-KATHARINE HEPBURN
BEST SCREEN PLAY

INE RNATIONAL
!PRESENTATIONS
1968-1969 e
SUMMER CONCERT SERIES
Four Piano Recitals-Rackham Auditorium

I
1

i

COLUMBIA PICTURES presents
Stanley Kramer
production
Spencer Sidney w
TRACY POITIER
Katharine
HEPBURN

guess
who's
coming
to dinner
TECHNICOLOW R

y

p t1

"N

ALICIA de \LARROCHA................ . June
VLADIMIR ASHKENAZY ...................July
DAVID BAR-ILLAN........................July
JORGE BOLET .............. ........... July
Series Tickets: $12.00-$8.00-$6.00
Single Concerts: $5.00-$4.00-$2.00
CHORAL UNION SERIES
HILL AUDITORIUM
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA...........Oct.
GARY GRAFFMAN, Pianist................. Oct.
BAVARIAN ORCHESTRA OF MUNICH. ...Oct.
Bl RGIT NILSSON, Soprano................Nov.
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Violinist; and
HEPHZIBAH MENUHIN, Pianist ...2:30, Nov.
GREGG SMITH SINGERS ........ ........ 2:30, Jan.
HAGUE PHILHARMONIC .................Jan.
"CARMEN" (Goldovsky Opera Co.) .... 8:00, Feb.
RUDOLF SERKIN, Pianist...................Mar.
MOSCOW STATE SYMPHONY...............Mar.
Season Tickets: $30.00-25.00-20.00-15.00-12.00

27
10
16
22

When in Southern California visit Upiversal City Studios

There were five

Generals inside...and one Private outside,

rp10 1

5
14
26
14
24
12
24
15
5
13

The problem was to get the five Generals inside.. outside

and avoid getting waylaid by a

beautiful countess',

7-4

DANCE SERIES
HILL AUDITORIUM
NATIONAL BALLET (Washington, D.C.) ........
ROMANIAN FOLK BALLET .... ..............
MAZOWSZE DANCE CO. (Poland)...........
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE
BALLET FOLKLORICO OF MEXICO ..,.........

Oct.
Oct.
Nov.
Feb.
Feb.

11
24
18
8
26

PAU

Season Tickets: $15.00-12.50-10.00-7.50-6.00
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

I,,.,
'C6Ill

MADRIGALISTI DI VENEZIA...............
MELOS ENSEMBLE (from London) ............
JANET BAKER, English -mezzo-soprano........
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO ................. .
ISRAEL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA ..............
COLOGNE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA.. ........
ntrPZrDA AAIL.II~IA kilr_ 1 n rF11 C[:1 r,7_

Oct.
Nov.
Jan.'
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
&A-..

20
7
5
10
22
014

s !« <
0.0

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan