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April 11, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-11

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Thursday, April 11, 1968
Mounting Tension Marks'
Detroit Paper Shutdown)

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

THrIHGNDAL aeFv

Kennedy's Campaign Machine
Moves into 'Indianer' Primary

Interested Sophomores

DETROIT (P) - The Detroit
* News used to advertise: "What in
the world is going on? If you read
The News you know."
If that be true, Dgtroiters
haven't known since last Nov. 15.
And The Detroit Free Press,
which boasted of being "On Guard
for Over a Century," hasn't been
on guard anywhere since last
Nov. 17.
For 147 days - almost five
months - Detroit's 1.6 million
inhabitants have had to depend
upon televisionand radio and a
scant'supply of newspapers from
elsewhere to learn what is going
* on.
Sympathy' Strikes
A Teamsters Union strike shut
the evening News at midnight Nov.
15. Two days later the morning
Free Press shut down under a
mutual agreement that a strike
against one newspaper is a strike
against both.
Teamsters and the publishers
reached agreement last month on
a package. increasing wages and
fringe benefits by $30 a week over
the next three years. The straight
time wage before the strike was
$150 a week.
While teamsters and publishe's
dickered, contracts of some 13
other unions with which the
papers deal expired, and at least
four of them formally declared
strikes. As yet agreement has
been reached with none of these.
'Not Good Enough'
Norman Park, chairman of the
Council of Newspaper Unions,
termed the Teamsters' settlement
"not good, enough" to satisfy
other members of the council.
Park insisted' the newspapers
bargain with the council on econ-
4 omic issues and individually with
the various unions on nonecon-
omic issues. The publishers reject-
ed this on the grounds Park did
not have advance authority to
commit individual member unions
to whatever' agreement w a s
reached.

Both the publishers and the
unions have kept their differences
hidden from the public, except
to say they involve both economic
and noneconomic issues.
Toledo, New York, Chicago and
some other newspapers have in-
creased shipments to Detroit news
stands, but these usually are
grabbed up quickly.
All television and radio stations
havp increased news coverage and
w ,- nrded time devoted to news.
Suburban Papej .
Suburbanrnewspapersnh a y e
benefitted from advertising fun-
neled to them by Detroit mer-
chants, but they have not moved
into the Detroit subscriber mar-
ket.
One explained suburban news-
papers hope to pick up former
News and Free Press subscribers
in their circulation areas, but
added "we don't cover Detroit,
and how would we get distribu-
tion there without the Team-
sters?"
The Detroit newspaper shut-
down now has exceeded that
which kept New York's now de-
funct World Journal Tribune
from rolling for 140 days in 1966.
That one lasted 140 days, com-
pared with a city-wide New York
shutdown that spanned 114 days
in 1962-63.
A Toledo, Ohio, strike kept that
city's morning and evening new-
papers off the street 154 days,
beginning Oct. 4, 1966, although
settlement came at the end of
149 days.
Feinsinger
Mayor Jerome P. Cavanagh
announced March 23 he was
bringing in Prof. Nathan P. Fein-
singer, a,. nationally recognized
expert on labor mediation and
arbitration, to assist in attempt-
ing to settle the strikes.
Cavanagh since has reported
.some progress on non-economic
issues, but no major economic
movement.
When racial disturbances in the

wake of the assassination of Dr..
King last Thursday resulted in a
state of emergency being declared,
Cavanagh proposed a truce and
a resumption of publication "dur-
ing this emergency," adding that
this should not hamper bargain-
ing and mediation when the
emergency ended.

COLUMBUS, Ind. (R) - Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy brought his
presidential campaign - and his
Massachusetts accent - into In-
diana yesterday as he sought a
quick, decisive victory over Sen.
Eugene J. McCarthy in the state's
crucial May 7 primary.
"Indiana is the key primary,"
he told crowds in Fort Wayne
and at a courthouse in this cen-
tral Indiana town.

Indiana may very well decide In obvious reference to Brani-
who's going to be the Democratic gin's candidacy, Kennedy told the
nominee-and very likely the next citizens of Columbus, "I would not
President of the United States." like to see Indiana waste its votes.
Kennedy's sharp Massachusetts Make yours count."
inflection brought giggles from K
the 2,000 townspeople clustered Indiana showed evidence of the
before the Bartholomew County change the chaotic events of thej
courthouse in Columbus. Twice past two weeks may bring to his
within seconds he pronounced the pa gn
name of the state "Indianer." capaign.
And a well-dressed woman He repeated none of his earlier
carne over to a member of the criticism of President Johnson -
Kennedy party after his address who has withdrawn from the pres-
and said in some irritation: "If idential sweepstakes. And he did
you could get him to say 'Indiana' not attack, as he has in the past,!
instead of 'Indianer' he could get the administration's Vietnam war
a lot more votes." policy.
The New York Democrat clash- He did repeat his earlier in-
es head on for the first time with sistence that the South Viet-
McCarthy in the Indiana contest namese should bear the main bur-
for 63 delegates to the Democratic den of the war. And he stressed
national convention. Gov. Roger his standard campaign theme -
D. Branigin is entered as a more jobs, less welfare, more local
favorite son candidate. control of government.
ORGANIZATION NOTICES
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Anyone interested in being a subcom-
mittee chairman for the Soph Show
Publicity Committee is invited to a
meeting Monday evening, April 15th
at 7:30 P.M. in the Michiganj Room on
the 2nd floor of the League.

1

USE OF TIllS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCENMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
room 1011 SAB.,
* * *I
Southern Asia Club, bag lunch on
Fri., April.12 in the Commons Roomof
Lane Hall. Mr. Alien Gudkin of the
Dept. of Psychology and ISR will speak
on "The Assimilation of Chinese Stu-I
dents in Thai Society."
* *s*
Graduate Student Outing Club, aft- i
ernoon hike plus planning of end-term I

camping trip. April 14, 2 p.m., Rackham
(Huron Street entrance).
Baha'i Student Group, informal dis-
cussion, "Man-One Family," 520 N.
Ashley, 8:00 p.m., Fri., April 12. All
welcome, Call 662-3548 if you need
transportation.
Student Aid to Ypsilanti State Hos-
pital, meeting for anyone interested in
working with or living in a Half-way
House for students and mental pa-
tients. Meeting is in UGLI Multipur-
pose Rm., 4:10 p.m., Thurs., April 11.

-Associated Press
Kennedy arrives at Ft. Wayne

Exam Week Movies (FREE!I)
April 17 &19-Union Ballroom
8:00PM

I.

""I'I

JOHN MILLER'S
Last Ann Arbor Party

ANN ARBOR HALFWAY HOUSE
benefit performance
at the Canterbury House
April 10 and 11
Wednesday and Thursday-9:00 P.M.
Wednesday-Charlie Chaplin in The Kid
April 10 Peter Griffith, classical guitarist
The Charging Rhinoceros of Soul

April 19-Burstey Dining
8:00 P.M.
17th-"Me and the Colonel"-
Danny Kaye
19th-"It Happened to Jane"-
Doris Day

Room

10 P.M.-Olde Canterbury House
(Catherine & Division)

Thursday-
April II

John Higgins Quintet
St. Louis Union
Shorts by Keewatin Dudney

19th Burley-"When Comedy Was King"

EVERYONE WELCOME

PLUS: ROADRUNNER CARTOONS

Donation-$1 .25

I

Join The Daily Today!

;.;1

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Nancy

Asin,

Steve Elman

and Alice Nusbaum

Have Subscribed to

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£idrti!Mrn

Daitj

for the

Summer

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Why

Don't

You?

Work to secure Michigan delegates
from your home community for

EUGENE McCARTHY

Call

764-0558

Come to a meeting

Thursday, April

11

7:30 P.M., Room 3C Union

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