100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 09, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesdav. April 9. 1 9

I eT HEMCiGA AL

Ti.jp UcV Y Anrl 17,1 7V0

D

SIX YEARS' SERVICE:
Manning To Leave LSA Post;

AppInte
By MARCIA ABRAMSON
John J. Manning Jr., admin-
istrative assistant in the literary
college, will. leave the University
at the end of next month to be-
come Assistant Dean of Students
at the University of Connecticut
a.t Storrs.
Connecticut, with 17,000 stu-
dents, is the largest state univer-
sity in the northeast.
* Manning said his new post will
include areas or work similar to
what he his been doing here, such
as academic discipline.
New Duties
"The Dean of Students at Con-
necticut has a somewhat closer
connection to the academic world,"
explalined Manning. "The Dean
reports directly to the provost
,(chancellor) as the/deans of each
individual college do, not directly
to the Regents as the Vice-Presi-
dent for Student Affairs does
here.,,
Manning will also be a lecturer
in the English department at
Connecticut, as he has been at the
University. He recently earned his
doctorate and wrote a 611-page
dissertation on his specialty, the
16th century.
"I think a teacher has to be a
Renaissance man, and this posi-
Lion has been for me the most per-
fect way of implementing on a
day-to-day basis my own educa-
tional values and philosophy,"
panning explained.
Functions as Teacher
"Whether counseling or taking
formal action, I'm functioning as
a teacher, not,.a counselor or an
administrator. I can be identifiable
as a port in a storm-a delightful
visibility," he added.
Manning said'Connecticut is
somewhat unlike Ann Arbor. Most
students do not live in apartments,
and the area is rural. "Most of the
weekend action drains off into
oston'or New York City-Storrs
is about halfway between," he ex-
plained.
Manning came to the University
in 1962 as a graduate student and
teaching;assistant./ He took his
present post in 1964.In addition
to teaching and counseling, until
last year Manning was a resident
director in the dormitories, first
in West Quad and then in Fletcher
Hall.
Seek Successor
The administrative board of the
literary college will choose a suc-
cessor for Manning. "I assume
he'll be chosen from within our
own structure," Manning said. He
did not know exactly when the de-
cision would be made.
Manning was the third faculty.

Dean at Connecticut

member to hold his post. He was
preceded by James Robertson, as-
sociate dean of the literary col-
lege.
"The position called administra-
tive assistant was created some
years ago as an opportunity for"
Junior faculty members to work
closer to the administration and
to students," explained Robert-

son. "Manning spent a great deal
of time with students and showed
great energy and patience. He was
always willing to talk."
"I've tried to drive a wedge into
the alleged impersonality of the
University," Manning explained.
"I've also tried to institutionalize
it. Here this kind of attitude has
been available for appointments."

LBIJ Conference To Set
Site for" Vietnam Talks

(Continued from Page 1)
Vietnam that the President will
hold at his all-day conference.,
U.S. officials said Phnom Penh
could not handle the communica-
tions requirements that could arise
if a full-scale conference were
called. TheU.S. does not have an
embassy there, after Cambodia
broke diplomatic ties in 1965.
The United States wants to hold
the talks in Geneva, but specula-
tion is that a compromise will
place them in Vientiane.
Sources in Phnom Penh said
Hanoi wants to maintain a sharp
distinction between the military
talk to arrange a cessation of
American attacks north of the
demilitarizedzone on the one
hand, and future political peace
negotiations-possibly within the
framework, of the 1954 Geneva
Conference-on the other hand.
Hanoi almost certainly would
demand the participation of a
fullscale delegation from South
Vietnam's Communist National
Liberation Front, the sources said.
Cambodia's Prince Norodom Si-
hanouk has repeatedly offered his
capital as the site for the Viet-
nam peace conference-but he
lacks diplomatic relations with the
United States.
The sources added the American
suggestion of Geneva was unlikely
to be acceptable to the North Viet-
namese.
Repeated claims by Hanoi that
U.S. planes recently bombed a
North Vietnamese province far to
the north of the 20th parallel
brought a denial meanwhile from
Secretary of Defense Clark M.'
Clifford.
"There have been no United
States attacks north of the 20th

parallel since the President's
speech eight 'days ago," Clifford
said.
Hanoi Radio charged Thursday
that U.S. planes dropped 50 bombs
on a heavily populated area in the
northwest,, corner of North Viet-
nam.
"The North Vietnamese are er-
ror," Clifford said in his state-
ment. "American planes have not
bombed the province of Lai Chau."
The Communist allegations had
raised concern among adminis-
tration officials that the curr'ent
effort to establish contact might
be adversly affected. Clifford said
that at his request Gen. Earle G.
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint
Chiefg of Staff, checked with
commanders in the field "and in-
formed me that there was no pres-
ent evidence of any such bombing
attack."
Clifford said the probe showed
that no U.S. attack W'as conducted
within 200 'miles at Lai Chau,
which is near the Laotian border.
Clifford said that between 7 a.m.
and noon Thursday, the period in,
which Hanoi claimed the raid oc-
curred, "the northern most attack
by U.S. aircraft was 35 miles south
of the 20th parallel."
The South Vietnamese National
Assembly rejected Sunday "neu-
tralism" and any possible coalition
government with Communist par-
ticipation. It said peace negotia-
tions unacceptable to the govern-
ment would be considered invalid.
The assembly adopted a resolu-
tion expressing its views by voice
after a two-day debate.
The resolution appealed to allied
government to continue support of
"the South Vietnamese people in
their task of safeguarding free-
dom and peace."

Regents To
Reconsider
IDA Ties
(Continued from Page 1)
The Princeton faculty said past
sponsorship of IDA "is not par-
ticulaly a good symbol df the
university's commitments, aspir-
ations and achievements."
The common complaint, magni-
fied by protests of college student
groups, is that thehUniversity
"never saw reports that went to
the Department of Defense."
Norman says, "ordinarily in a
consortium, the University plays a
part in the direction of the con-
sortium." But with 'IDA, an in-
stitute Norman likened to Rand
Corporation, "the University at
no time validated what was done."
"We do not want to have it im-
plied that we have feedback from
the institute and are approving
everything IDA does," Norman
says.
The Princeton faculty urged
joint action among IDA members
to change the structure under
which the institute is not respon-
sible to the institutions.
"If the sponsors cannot agree to
change the structure," the com-
mittee said, "then we recommend
unilateral withdrawal.
At this, time, however, group
action seems unlikely and no
school has actually withdrawn1
from the institute.
IDA was originally formed after
former Secretary of Defense
Charles E. Wilson asked James R.
Killian, president of Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology, to
set up a defense research corpor-
ation.
Killian was reluctant for MIT
to go it alone and invited other
schools "to share the blame of
taking these people (scientists)
out of purely educational work forj
a while into defense work."
Four other schools - Cal Tech,
Case Institute of Technology.
Stanford and Tulane accepted
and IDA was founded.
Since then, the University, Chi-
cago, Illinois, California, Prince-
ton, Penn State and Columbia
have joined the consortium.,
The initial group received a
$500,000 grant from the Ford
Foundation to begin work, and
IDA's current annual budget is
about $12 million.
Read and Use
Classified Ads

The CPA
is a
wanted man.

ALL THE SPAGHETTI
YOU CAN EAT
for $1.00
EVERY WEDNESDAY
Aunt Jeumnct EZTCU&H
Junction U.S. 23 & 12

GOLF at DON'S PARl 3
50665 West Huron River Dr.
LEAGUES WELCOME
Susterka Lake HUnter 3-5010

4

..........
KV . . .... ...

a

:!

-

~ND ~IAVE
0 IU~ftT
~EM~&T
lAThS
I 474301
~dth a~tg
al $tud~e~
~ ~

SCOJT,~ ?< lid# seni. < e1r
f........w . :...~h~ic ~ fe

<t3

3:

CLIENT
ME NT

::#::;

:; :f

#:

;:: :::

CORATEXOPJTROLLER'
* ~PA preferre4,, Must have
r~rti~< sy$t~*~$ & finan~i4~
~r~an~ement, Ex~eilent' ~
~ipt~" w/ma~r c~. $2~-25,eeo
* Wiit~ ~ ~ /

>:t

:::

;:

;:I

:rr.; :;::; ......... ::#

s u?
i~~v:t iii: :!
SR.>

:::t::

ACC:11.
FRES~FM CRP>:.: TR

:

... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..
tae4,~.*'~*~
ACOUT
?c

Never have so many positions been
open that offer the CPA an exciting
and meaningful future.
He can join an independent ac-
counting firm that serves a varied list
of, clients; there he'll have the pros-
pect of becoming a partner. Or in
time he can start his own practice.
Or he can eventually become a
key man on the management team of
practically any type of enterprise:
television, steel, oil, hospitals; aero-
space, philanthropic foundations, ad-
vertising. You name it.
Each year society becomes more
specialized and complex, requiring
;new concepts of fact-gathering, prob-
lem-solving, and commynication of
economic' information.
The CPA's special skills and
knowledge are needed to shape these \
new concepts.
If you can think creatively, and
can analyze complex situations and
come up with imaginative solutions,
you might make a good CPA.
You can select college courses
that could lead you to your CPA cer-
tificate soon after you graduate. Or,
you can go o.n to graduate school. Ask
your faculty, advisor about it.
We'll be glad to send you a book-
let with the whole CPA story.
Just drop a card or note to: Dept.
A10, AICPA, 666 Fifth Avenue, New
York, New York 10019

:

;::: { : : J"'Jielf4si' . i'. : :.::::::::Ji'Yta a'::.4:. a : i ...:: :.^:. :.^::::: .".:: :: i r, awr.. ac y . r .

w
'A

ACCT~ F~-B AW*$1,
001.,eae x kyt
.:d< .:}:"}5} ' ss. i st:::an .", ',. ": -}:{.!:.}t". " .[ s, ' , '.,,.::y;:--'; ous TyC ;}} ': :;.
lid sr. xrs+ onss

4

AIRPORT
LIMOUSINE
Regular Runs to
Metro Airport
30 TRIPS DAILY
from side door of
MICHIGAN UNION
971-3700.

ANN ARBOR, HALFWAY. HOUSE
benefit performance
at the Caniterbury House
April 10 and 11
Wednesday and Thursday-9:00 P.M.
Wednesday-Fritz Lang's 'M'
April 10-Peter Griffith, classical guitarist
-Christopher & Sarah, folk singers
Thursday-The Changing Rhinoceros of Soul, band
April 11-John Higgins Quintet
Donation-$1.25

CLEVELANDERS
While you're home for the
summer, you can earn 3, 6 or. 9
credits at
CASE WESTERN RESERVE
UNIVERSITY,
SUMMER SESSION
opens June 18 and ends August
9. For information-,about courses
offered, write: Vice Provost for
Student Services, Case Western
Reserve University, Cleveland,
Ohio 44106.

....... ... . : :

:. .

<: :::

CONT0LLER, ASS;CAwtipb
x-x.
1~ jta. '4 1rt- i f"..O .4 i xC i

::

:~s 1 -x '

<: <>

E:

.............. i ..........

ftcii F1fo:

:;:*

......M....
3A 1 .1* se

:;:; ;;:;:r::::: r ::::: sa

AnKA ican InstitUte of
TORAV T SOUTaha Certified Public Accountants

q

'-
I
' ' e !' !i f P I a3j 9.
'
y ^2 } na, s 2 ,; ;,;{ . :may i'
§r b
.,q ? ti..''
t[4 .. .+.
} .
.i{
ti :.
, fiF ikvk S

.:.

I

820 FULLER

WHY CART ALL THOSE CLOTHES HOME?
Greene's way
makes going home
a cinch
JUST CALL GREENE'S for one of our fabulous
Handi-Hampers storage boxes. Pack all the clothes
you won't wear until fall-Clothes you would ordi-
narily pack up take home, have cleaned, pack up
again and bring back in the fall.
NOW, ALL YOU NEED TO DO is turn the Hamper
over to Greene's, They clean the lot at regular
cleaning prices and store it in a refrigerated moth-
proof vault. When you returr in the fall, call
Greene's again, your clothes will be taken out of the
vault, returned to you freshly pressed on hangers
and packed in neat polyethylene bags, ready for
your clothes closet.
PRICE? $4.95 plus regular cleaning and pressing
prices-includes $250.00 insurance.
Call NOrmandy 23-23-1 or Stop at
any Greene's Plant for Information

4

}

fuller.

east

G
I
I
I I
!I
it
ti i

Designed and maintainpd to accommodate the serious student and
the 'conscientious professional. Fuller East has created. its own
mode of apartment living. Stop by and see -. .
fuller east features .. .
* two-bedroom completely furnished apartments ranging in size from very large to queen
size.
* many special appointments, catering to istudents' needs and desires, including private
balconies and frosty comfortable air-conditioning, sound conditioning.
because of the high demand for a controlled situation by graduate students and profes-
sional people, eight hundred fuller (adjacent to 820 Fuller) will be reserved; for gradu-

P.S. BY THE WAY, we notice that some of the
other shops around town are offering the Greene's
Handi-Hamper idea. But they can't offer the on-
the-premise refrigerated storage vault of Greene's
exclusive Microclean process. It's a plus to you at
the same price.

ii

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan