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April 06, 1968 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-06

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I
THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 6, 1968

rage Five

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Civil Unrest Cancels
HaewaiiPeace Talis

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
otticial publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan aly assumes no editor-
t ai responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
min of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once koflly,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, APRIL 6
Day Calendar
Professional Theatre Program -
Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's
Dreamn", Lydia Mendelssohn Theater,
8:30 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Lee Ann Stephens, Harp: -School of
Music Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Carl Dreyer's/ Passion
of Joan of Arc: Architecture Auditor-
ium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
University Players Department of
Speech - Sophocles' Antigone: True-
blood Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
School of Music - Undergraduate
Concerto Concert - Theo Alcantara,
Conductor: Hill Auditoruim, 8:30 p.m.
(;eterali Notices
TV Center Programs: On Sun., April
7 the following program produced by
the TV Center will have its initial
telecast in Detroit:
12:00 Noon, WWJ TV, Channel 4.
"How Pictures Talk." A demonstration
of how news may be slanted by use
of photographs, TV camera shots and
news film.

Gretchen Groth. Statler-Hilton Inn,
April 7-12, 8:30-5:00.
Center for Russian and EastEuropean
Studies Lecture Wolfgang Leonhard,
"Contemporary Communist Revision-
ism," Monday. April 8 at 4:10 p.m.,
Auditorium D, Angell Hall. Mr. Leon-
hard is a Visiting Prof essor of His-
tory at Yale University, an internat-
ionally famous expert on Communism,
and author of the book Child of the
Revolution.
Department of Germanic Languages
and Literatures presents, under the au-
spices of the Austraian Institute of
Culture, dramatic readings in English,
fromhAustrian literature by members
of the Vienna Burgtheater. The per-
formance will take place Monday, April
8 at 8 p.m. in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall. Admission free.
Summer Jobs in Washington, D. C.
Are you going to living in the D.C.
area this summer? Will you be look-
ing for a roommate for the summer?
If so, call the Washington Summer
Intern Program at 764-3492 and leave
your name and telephone number.
SGC
Summary of action taken by Stu-
dent Government Council at its meet-
ing April 4, 1988.
Appointed: Jan MalinoWski, Mary Mar-
garet Livingston, Kenneth Mogil, Ben
Brody and David Duboff to Joint
Judiciary Council.
Approved: That Council vest all au-
thority in the Coordinating Vice Pres-
ident to determine allocation of of-
fice space and cage space in the
Student Activities Building; and
That Council should approve the
criteria set up by the Student Activ-
ities Building Coordinator and the
Coordinating Vice President.
Appointed: Paul Milgrom and Lee
Mary Danielson to the University Cal-
endaring Committee.

SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 S.A.B.
NOTICE: Typing test for Summer
jobs in Federal Agencies (GS-1-4) will
be given April 6, today, at the Main
Street Branch of the Post Office, Main
at Catherine Streets.
Opening on Mackinac island for
lady -housekeeper and cook over 25.
Good wages and transporation paid.
Also position for young man house-
man,sground maintenance and care of
horses.
Northville Swim Club, Northville,
Mich. Man over 21 to manager swim
club, salary open.
Goldblatt's, Chicago, Ill. Application
for Colge Boards open, good salary.
City of Flint, Police Intern Summer
Program, man and women, 21 min.
must have taken Summer civil serv.
exam.
Radio Station WAMM, Flint, Mich.
Summer relief engineer, first class
Radio and Telephone license req.
Intervational Ranger Camps in Swit-
zerland and Denmark, 21 or over.
Cityof Detroit Civil Service, resi-
dents of Detroit proper.
NASA, Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
Engineering fields, over sophomore
year, must have taken Summer Fed.
exam.
Thursday, April 11
Placement interviews at Genera Div-
ision, Blureau of Appts, 3200 &.A.B., cal
764-4760 before 4 p.m. for appoint-
ments:
Teachers Corps, throughout the
U.S., - Men and women, all day, call
764-4760 for appts. Two types of as-
signments. Teacher interns - recent
graduates or special qualified upper-
classmen. 2-3 mo. preservice training
at 50 participating college and univ.
acquinting them with social and econ.
problems of poverty, and with the
communities in which they will serve;
then enter a nearby university, yield-
ing MA and cert. at end of 2 years.
Teacher Corps team leaders - have
graduate degrees and teaching exper in
poverty areas. After preservice training,
which encludes more background on
techniques used with disadvantaged,
Spanish communities, Indian reserva-
tions, and migrant labor campus, they
may serve as leader of team of teacher
interns, work with school officials on
programs, serve as liaison between the
university, school and neigbhborhood.
ENTER FOR RUSSIAN AN[

(Continued from Page 1)
the bill. He was quickly joined by
20 other Republican members un-
der the leadership of Rep. Charles
E. Goodell of New York.
Johnson also canceled a planned
flying trip to Hawaii to consult
with American military and dip-
lomatic officials on preliminaries
to possible peace talks with the
North Vietnamese-a trip that had
been scheduled to start Thursday
night but was postponed indefi-
nitely by the slaying of the Negro
leader in Memphis.
The White House did not ex-
plain the outright cancellation of
the Pacific flight but the reason
was obvious: Officials felt the
Vietnam conference was less ur-
gent, for the moment, than the
threat that the country this week-
end might face serious civil dis-
orders, riots and looting.
The President designated to-
morrow as a day of national
mourning for the Negro apostle
of non-violence and winner of the
Nobel Peace Prize who was shot
and killed by a sniper Thursday
night.
"Men of all races, all religions,
all regions must join together in
this hour to deny violence its vic-
tory-and to fulfill the vision of
brotherhood that gave purpose to
Martin Luther King's life and
works," the proclamation stated.
It was issued just after Johnson
emerged from an hour-long con-
ference with about 25 leaders of
civil rights organizations, govern-
ment officials and leaders of Con-
gress. They all accompanied John-
son to Washington National
Cathedral, a gray gothic highlight
on the Washington skyline.

A hurriedly arranged solemn
memorial service for Dr. King
drew thousands of mourners to
the cathedral.
However, one question left open
as the meeting closed was wheth-
er the planned Poor People's
March, which Dr. King was to
have led in Washington starting
April 22, would be held as planned.
There were no indications that
it would be canceled, but the
day's violence suggested that gov-
ernment and city authorities
might reconsider the conditions
under which it could be con-
ducted.
The White House conference
was resumed briefly after the
President returned to the White
House. Then Johnson, speaking
to the nation on radio and tele-
vision, appealed for adherence to
the principles of brotherhood and
non-violence espoused by King.
The President said that when
he received "the terrible news" of
King's death, "my heart went out
to his people --- especially to the
young Americans who, I know,
must wonder if they are to be de-
nied a fullness of life because of
the color of their skin."
Johnson said he therefore called
Negro leaders to the White House
to consult with him and remain
convinced that "the dream of
Martin Luther King has not died
with him."

Guardsmen,
Army Patrol
Washington
(Continued from Page 1)
Later, Washington clapped a
dusk-to-dawn curfew on the city
and banned sale of alcohol, fire-
arms and ammunition.
There were few reports of gun.
fire during the uprising, which ap-
peared to have reached its height
during the late afternoon and
early evening hours. The spokes-
man said the injured, who were
taken to local hospitals, included
seven policemen and six firemen.
Vance was working with Gen.
Ralph Haines Jr., Army vice chief
of staff, in deploying some 4,000
Army and National Guard troops
sent in to assist about 1,000 Wash-
ington policemen. Five hundred
men of the Army crack Old Guard
were protecting the White House,
the Capitol, and the complex of
federal buildings known as the
Federal Triangle.

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