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April 05, 1968 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-04-05

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 5, 1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, April 5, 1968

II -

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(Continued from Page 1)
A shot then rang out, Jackson
said.
Jackson said the only sound
King uttered after that was:
"Oh!"
"I knocked him down," he said.
"When I turned around, I saw
police coming from everywhere.
They said 'Behind you.' The po-
lice were coming from where the
shot came."
Branch, another member of the
King party, said, "The bullet ex-
ploded in his face. It knocked
him off his feet."
Solomon Jones, King's chauf-
feur, said he saw a "man in white
clothes" running from the scene.
King was in Memphis as a
wayside stop before his big dem-
onstration in Washington sched-
uled in a few weeks.
The Washington effort-a huge
camp-in at the capital to demand
jobs or income-had taken most
of his time since January.
King returned to Memphis
Wednesday to lead another mas-
sive protest march next Monday

in support of the garbage strikers.
Sympathizers from other parts of
the country had announced they
would join, and as many as 10.000
or more were expected for the
march.
A similar demonstration March
28 of about 6,000 erupted into the
first violence in Memphis since
the beginning of the civil rights
movement. Police and march
leaders, alike, blamed the out-
burst on Negro youths on the
fringe of the march.
One 17-year-old Negro youth
was killed in the violence after
the march, and his funeral Tues-
day was attended by several
thousand mourners.
Violence erupted again shortly
after King was shot. Police re-
ported snipers firing on police
and national guard units and sev-
eral persons were reported hit by
the shots.
Several firebombings and other
acts of vandalism also were re-
ported.
Police director Frank Holloman
ordered a curfew back into effect

i
i

National guard units, which had Hollon
been deactivated only Wednesday tion imdi
after five days on duty here, were
called back to active duty and white m
rushed to Memphis. I yards au
A bomb threat was telephoned said polt
to Methodist Hospital and police but tha
were rushed to the scene, custody.

nan said early investiga-
icated the assassin was a
hale, who was "50 to 100
way in a flop-house." He
ce had no definite leads,
t two persons were in

"until further notice" as youths Armed guards were immediately
ran rampant, many of them with posted at St. Joseph Hospital
fire bombs in their hands. where King died,

4

Nation Mourns King's Loss

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(Continued from Page 1)
Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey said the slaying "brings
shame to our country. An apostle
of nonviolence has been the victim
of violence." The vice president
however, said Dr. King's death will
bring new strength to the cause
he fought for.
Mrs. Rosa Parks, one of the
earliest prominent figures in the
modern civil rights movement,
wept at her Detroit home: "I can't
talk now, I just can't talk."
"Martin is dead," said James
Farmer, former national director
of the Congress of Racial Equality.
"God help us all.
"We kill our conscience, we cut
open our soul. I can't say what
is in my heart-anger, fear, love
for him and sorrow for his family
and the family of black people."
James Meredith, who was shot
in June, 1966, during a voter reg-
istration march in Mississippi,
said, "This is America's answer to
the peaceful, nonviolent way of
obtaining rights in this country."
Roy Wilkins, executive director
of the National Association for
the Advancement of Colored Peo-
ple, said the NAACP is "shocked
and deeply grieved by the das-
tardly murder of Dr. Martin
Luther King . . . It will not stay
the civil rights movement; it will
instead spur it to greater activity."
Floyd McKissick, national di-
rector of CORE, said that with

Dr. King's death, nonviolence "is
now a dead philosophy.
"This is racism in the most ex-
treme form,. it is truly American
racism," McKissick said.
"We make no predictions, but
mark my word, black Americans of
all sorts and beliefs loved Martin
Luther King."
Mississippi Negro leader Charles
Evers said in Jackson he had been
threatened by a telephone caller
after Dr. King was shot.
Evers said the first telephone
call he received after King was
shot was from a man who said,
"We just killed that black S.O.B.
Martin Luther King and you're
next."
Evers called an immediate "ur-
gent mass meeting" at the Ma-
sonic Temple where he had met
with King 15 days earlier.
Evers was 'at home here when
he received word King had died.
As he heard the news, he said
only. "He'srdead, he's dead, he's
dead."
In a statement later, Evers said,
"I think America has lost one of
the greatest champions for non-
violent peaceful demonstrations
that she's had . . . I don't know
where we turn to from here. I
personally cannot and will not be
responsible for what Negroes will
do in the future.
"I feel that America is not going
to wait until summer. I believe it's
begun already-unless they move
and move quickly to apprehend
and convict the murderers, Amer-
ica's through.

p

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