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January 05, 1968 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-05

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FRIDAY. JANUARY 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PAGE FIVE

FRIDAY. JANUARY 5.1968 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

OUTLINES VIET POLICY:
McCarthy in N. H. Race

Bond Sales

WASHINGTON (P)-Sen. Eu-
gerie J. McCarthy accused Presi-
dent Johnson Thursday of presi-
ding over "a kind of Republican:
foreign policy," and said he will
press his Democratic presidential
challenge whatever the outcome,
of the early primary elections.
McCarthy announced Wednes-
day that he plans to enter a slate
of pledged delegates iu the New
Hampshire balloting, while run-
ning himself in the' primary's.
presidential preference poll.
Johnson supporters in the state
are conducting a write-in cam-
paign for the President, and also
will enter a slate of. delegates
favoring his renomination.
r The Minnesota Democrat ac-
knowledged that New Hampshire's
March 12 primary, latest addition
to his schedule of six state races
against Johnson, will be "a very
tough campaign."
"I intend to go on no matter
what happens in New Hampshire
to the other primaries to which
I've publicly committed myself,"
McCarthy told a news conference.
Vietnam War
His race against Johnson is
based on disagreement with the
administration's conduct of the
Vietnam war, and McCarthy said
U.S. policy there is not "a pro-
jection of what we expected" on
the basis of the President's 1964
campaign.
"What we're pursuingis a kind
of Republican foreign policy,"
McCarthy said. He said it was
Republicans, notably the late'
Secretary of State John Foster
Dulles, who put "the Asian em-
phasis into American foreign pol-
icy.
McCarathy would not forecast
the kind of showing he might
make in New Hampshire. "We're
going to try to get as many votes
as we can on the basis of present-
ing the issues."
He outlined his Vietnam policy
alternative this way:
" Stop escalation of the war.
* Halt the bombing as a pos-
3ible avenue to negotiations.
4 1

Negotiate with the Communist
National Liberation Front, polit-
ical arm of the Viet Cong guer-
rillas.
1 Ultimately, begin phased
withdrawals of American troops,
coupled with continuing efforts to
move the Saigon government into
negotiations with the Commu-
nists.
Write-in
On the delegate side of the bal-
lot, the Johnson backers -are or-
ganizing a move to gain "favor-
able" delegates to the Democratic
National Convention - meaning
they'll be committed to Johnson
for the first round of balloting.
Johnson has not entered the
preference side of the primary,

but his backers are organizing a
write-in campaign.
Eugene Daniel, Jr., chief New
Hampshire supporter of Sen. Rob-
ert F. Kennedy, (D-NY), said he
will continue his plans to elect
delegates "favorable" to Kennedy,
and will not abandon a planned
write-in campaign for Kennedy
on the preference side of the bal-
lot.
State Atty. Gen. George Pap-
pagianis has ruled that any polit-
ical committee set up to obtain
votes for a candidate on the pre-
ference side of the ballot-includ-
ing write-ins-must get the writ-
ten consent of the candidate, and
file it with the state, before the
committee can receive or spend
money.

Film Distributors Ask For
Clear Obscenity Guidelines

WASHINGTON (P) - Dis-
tributors of movies banned in
Chicago and restricted in Dallas
are asking the Supreme Court to
clarify guidelines this year on
city film censorship.
The Dallas distributor says bans
should be limited to films found
obscene- under tests already set
by the Supreme Court and con-
tends Dallas standards are un-
constitutionally vague and am-
biguous.
The Chicago distributor says
that city's appeal procedure is
so time consuming that films can
be arbitrarily kept out of theaters
"beyond any permissible con-
stitutional limits.
The Chicago firm, Teitel Film
Corp., also claims an Illinois
court improperly ruled "Rent A
Girl" and "Body of a Female"
obscene on the grounds that they
are calculated to arouse sexual
desire.
Neither case challenges the
constitutionality of film censor-
ship itself. That appeared to be

upheld, with restraints, in the
court's Freedman vs. Maryland
decision in 1965.
Interstate Circuit, Inc., joined
by United Artists Corp., contends
Dallas w a s unconstitutionally
vague when it restricted the Brig-
itte Bardot film "Viva Maria" on
grounds of sexual promiscuity.
Interstate says film censorship
should be permitted only under
Supreme Court tests that mate-
rial is obscene when:
! Its dominant theme, apply-
ing contemporary moral stand-
ards, appeals to the prurient in-
terest.
* It has no redeeming social
importance.
* It patently affronts current
community standards of decency.
Teitel says Chicago kept its
two films out of theaters 20
months before a state court ever
ruled them obscene.
But the Illinois Supreme Court
held Chicago's procedure to be
constitutional and ruled both
films were obscene.

To Offset
Gold Flow
BRUSSELS (A) - President
Johnson is trying to sell U.S.
Treasury bonds to prosperous
West European countries to coun-
ter the outflow of gold and dol-
lars spent by American troops in
Europe, authoritative sources said
yesterday.
This is one of the forms of co-
operation in defense of the dollar
that Nicholas Katzenbach, under-
secretary of state, is seeking on
his tour of Western Europe. He
visited Brussels, headquarters of
the European Common Market
and the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization, yesterday. Then he
went to The Hague, capital of'
Holland, and on to Rome. He also
will visit Paris.
The United States has an out-
flow of $1.1 billion a year because
of its troops stationed in the
Common Market countries: West
Germany, France, Italy, Belgium,
Holland and Luxembourg.
Surplus
The six Common Market coun-
tries are expected to run a surplus
of $4 billion in 1967 and 1968 on
all their dealings with the United
States.
In Washington's view the wind-
fall of dollars from American
military spending ought to be
neutralized in some way. For
many years the bulk of it, spent
on and by U.S. troops in West
Germany, was offset by West
German arms buying in the
United States.
But Chancellor Kurt Georg
Kiesinger declined to make the
same agreements as his predecess-
ors Konrad Adenauer and Ludwig
Erhard. The United States, in
turn, decided to pull out 35,000
troops and accept a West German
purchase of $500 million in me-
dium term U.S. Treasury bonds.
Katzenbach got no promise
from Belgium Premier Paul van
den Boeynants to buy American
military planes -the Belgian air
force would rather have French
Mirages.
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Humphrey Harassed
By Congolese Youths

8:30 P.M.

KINSHASA, the Congo (IP)-
About 150 Congolese youths car-
rying anti - American banners
charged into Vice-President Hu-
bert H. Humphrey's motorcade
Thursday and one youth aimed a
kick at Humphrey's car.
The incident occurred as Hum-
phrey entered Kinshasa from the
airport on his arrival in the Con-
go on a nine nation African tour.
It was the first anti-American
Protests Held
By Europeans
By The Associated Press
A leftist West German student
organization said yesterday plans
were under way for an interna-
tional anti-Vietnam war demon-
stration in West Berlin next
month.
Karl Dietrich Wolff, president
of the West German Socialistic
Student Federation, said about
10,000 persons were expected to
take part.
There was more anti-war action
in Stockholm, Sweden. More than
50 Swedish youths pelted U.S.
Ambassador Philip Trezise and
his party with snowballs and eggs
Thursday when they entered the
Swedish Ministry of Finance. The
coats of the Americans were
stained with egg and melted snow.
The finance minister was "sur-
prised" at the action.

demonstration Humphrey has en-
countered on the tour.
A spokesman for Humphrey's
party said they had been warned
of the demonstration, but the vice
president decided not to have it
prevented. Three Jeeps carrying
soldiers followed Humphrey's car
but the soldiers did not leave.
their vehicles.
After meeting with President
Joseph D. Mobuto, Humphrey will
leave for Zambia today.
The youths had massed around
a monument to Patrice Lumumba,
onetime premier of the Congo who
was slain in 1961.
The Lumumba monument is at
the city's entrance. Along the rest
of the route, most onlookers quiet-
ly watched the motorcade with-
out waving.
When the motorcade approach-
ed, the youths crowded the road
and thumped on some of the cars.
Protest American Actions
One sign said: "We condemn
U.S. imperialism . . . crimes in
Vietnam." Another read: "Go,
back home, Humphrey!"
In a brief statement on his ar-
rival from Acra, Ghana, Hum-
phrey told Congolese dignitaries:
"The American people will be
among your strongest admirers as
the Congo grows and prospers,
proud of our mutual friendship
and our mutual belief in . . the
social justice of man kind."
He was greeted by about 1,000
members of the Congo's armed
forces and government officials.

NOON LUNCHEON 25c
Larry Berlin
Chairman Ann Arbor Chapter,
American Civil Liberties Union
"The American Civil Liberties Union,
An Organization for AllSeasons
Guild House

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at
1421 Hill St.

THE ARK
Three on a Match
(presently negotiating for national songwriting and
recording contracts)
singing popular and ORIGINAL folk-rock and folk music
$1.00 cover includes entertainment and refreshments

802 Monroe

Friday, Jan. 5

JoinThe Daily Today!

This is for you, Joey, and

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really mean it! !

PTFir BUor x rOUSFi

" open all day for rest, coffee, studying,
meetings, conversation, counselling, lunch, and peace
* nitetimes for light shows, theological-hash, Inquirer's class,
concerts, dance, poetry, and coffee house each weekend
* folk or jazz or rock masses each Sunday morning, Sermons
sung, danced, acted, discussed

I

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[

t

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ANju shpille s
announces these Special Events for January

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Il

"It's what's happening, baby!"
"GOO GOO GOO JOOB"

-Harriet

-the Walrus
almost anytime

330 Maynard St.

in the alley

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Chi Omega and Alpha Epsilon Pi

Presents the 3rd Annual

1
2
3
4
5

MID WINTER MADNESS

FRIDAY, Jan. 5
at Sabbath Service, 7:15 P.M.-
Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
Speaker: DR. BARBARA W. NEWELL,
Assistant to President Fleming
"A FRESH LOOK AT THE UNIVERSITY
and the RELIGIOUS FOUNDATION"
Discussion in Oneg Shabbat
SUNDAY, Jan. 7
DELHI-HOUSE, 5:30 P.M.-Glick Social Hall
$1.00-members; $1.25 others
followed by
DANCE, 6:30-8:30 P.M.
music by THE SORCERERS
Free to members; $1.00, others
SUNDAY, Jan. 14
GRAD MIXER, 8 P.M., Glick Social Hall
Must Be Over 21. ID Cards Required
75c members; $1.00, others
THURSDAY, Jan. 18, 8 P.M.
"ART OF ISRAEL," Illustrated Talk by
BACIA GORDON, Chicago Artist
FREE TO ALL
SUNDAY, Jan. 21
at DELHI-HOUSE at 5:30 P.M. ($1 and $1.25),
Glick Social Hall
and
following at 6:30 in Zwerdling-Cohn Chapel
PROF. IRVING HOWE, University Writer-
in-Residence, Translator, Editor, Critic
"YIDDISH LITERATURE and
WORLD LITERATURE"
Introduction by
Prof. Herbert H. Paper, Chairman, Linguistics Dept.
Admission to Lecture FREE TO ALL

PRESENTATIONS
in Hill Auditorium
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA OF LONDON ..................Wed., Jan. 17
Vaclav Neumann, Conductor
Program: Symphonic Requiem ........................ ..Britten
"Firebird" Suite ........................Stravinsky
Symphony No. 4, Op. 98...................... Brahms
NATIONAL BALLET FROM WASHINGTON, D.C . ...... . ...............Wed., Jan. 24
Program: "Coppelia"-Music by Delibes
NATHAN MILSTEIN, Violinist ....................... .............. Mon., Jan. 29
HELSINKI PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA ............................Sat., Feb. 24
Jorma Panula, Condt ctor; Arto Noras, Cellist
Program: Lemminkainen and the Maidens......... .......Sibelius
Aubade...............................Erik Bergman
Rococo Variations for Cello and Orchestra .. . . Tchaikovsky
Scherzo and Forging of the Sampo,
from the Kalevala Suite ................Uuno Klami
'TCKH M PH Pictures at an Exhibition . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . Moussorgsky
STOCKHOLM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA ..... ... ............Fri., Mar. 8
Antal Dorati, Conductor
VAN CLIBURN, Pianist...........................................Fri., Mar, 15
TORONTO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA..............................Thurs., Mar. 28
Seiji Ozawa, Conductor
Tickets: $6.00-$5.50-$5.00-$4.00-$3.00-.$2.00
in Rackham Auditorium
CHICAGO LITTLE SYMPHONY .. ..... ............................Sat., Jan. 20
Thor Johnson, Conductor; Gary Sigurdson, Flutist;
Alfio Pignotti, Violinist; Raymond Stilwell, Violist
Program: Symphony No. 6 in D major ("Le Matin") .. ....Haydn
Pastorale d'ete....... '......Honegger
Five Pieces for Small Orchestra (1962) Wallace Berry
(Commissioned for the Chicago Little Symphony)
Concerto for Flute and Orchestra .. .. ............Ibert
Symphonie Concertante for Violin and Viola .. Karl Stamitz
Danses Concertantes....................... Stravinsky
MUSIC FROM MARLBORO (vocal and instrumental).................2:30, Sun., Feb. 4
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
LOEWENGUTH QUARTET ........................ Fri., Feb. 16
Program: Quartet in D major, Op. 45 . . . . . , .. .. Roussel
Quartet in C major ...................... Ibert
Quartet in D major ...................... Franck
WARSAW CHAMBER ORCHESTRAm..r.....................A.b.Sat., Feb. 17
Program:' Sinfonia in B flat major . .. ... .......Albinoni
Nova Casa & Tamburetta ...... . . . . ....Jarzebski
Concerto for Violin in E major...............Bach
Suite for String Orchestra Corelli
Concerto in A major..................... Vivaldi
Concertino in G major.................Pergolesi
EARLY MUSIC QUARTET ............. ............-.....2:30, Sun., Feb. 18
Program: Italian Frottola and Instrumental Interludes;
French Theater Songs; Spanish Instrumental Music;
German Peasant Music; Spanish Romanzes;
German Art Songs; Italian Moriscos

"A SUMMER SCENE"

featuring

THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE

(formerly the 5 Bucks)

Admission:

75c Donation to

I

the American Cancer Society

I

II

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