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January 12, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAt'7.ii. V-

TUE MIU IEa aav N fl rsatlY

UL Nl' t~Ti

vi

Frosh Eligibility, AAU

lague

NCAA

By The Associated Press
The struggle for sup~remacy in
track and field between the Na-
tional Collegiate Athletic Asso-
ciation and the Amateur Athletic
Union reverted to its infancy
Wednesday when the NCAA offi-
cially called off the federally im-
posed moratorium at its annual
convention here.
An NCAA council statement,
approved by the convention at
large, said that beginning after
the 1968 Olympics, the NCAA
would again insist on "certifying"
any, non-collegiate meet that col-
lege athletes take part in.
This was the policy first adopt-
ed in January of 1965 that led
to a summer full of bitterness be-
fore the NCAA, at the request of
the U.S. Senate, agreed not to
enforce the certification rule
pending the decision of a panel
headed by labor mediator Theo-
dore Khec.
The AAU has always insisted
that it is the only body that can
*sanction a meet and would not
ask for NCAA certification of
the meets it sponsors.
The NCAA, for its part, will not
ask the AAU for sanction of its
meets where non-college athletes
sometimes compete.

*

*

*E

*

*

*

FRATERNITY

1ruins Clip wings; Royals Outlast Celtics

THEODORE KHEEL

years and in all NCAA post-sea-
son events.
The Western Athletic Confer-
ence, which includes such teams
as Wyoming, Utah, Arizona and
Arizona State, and the South-
eastern, with such teams as Ten-

R"'r~r'~v,?a..k: Z.:: Jl{ h .,'.JN.t :'. .....:?V':t'...,..":':::":......:1.t:L. ."..:'...?'.
Marcus L. Plant, Michigan Law Professor, was re-elected
president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association at the
group's annual convention yesterday in New York. Plant was
originally elected to the post last year, and has served as Michi-
gan's Big Ten faculty representative since 1955.
v r". .."r"My?'^°"' .t'{ .s. .S.":?;; .,;e"gf: "n . ;v:nt ii br"'t::"?r?

* In related action, the NCAA's
policy-making council ruled yes-
terday that the new freshman rule
affects only freshmen starting in
the 1967-68 school year, and is
not retroactive.
The rule, adopted by a 163-160
vote Wednesday, makes freshmen
eligible for all varsity sports ex-
cept football and basketball and
permits the mto compete for four

nessee, Alabama and Georgia,
have been permitting freshman
participation in minor and spring
sports.
While such'athletes could com-
pete in regular season dual meets
and competitions, they were pre-
vented by the NCAA rules from
taking part in NCAA events, such
as the national championships, in
more than the three varsity years
allowed.

By The Associated Press
BOSTON - Rookie Derek San-
derson's breakaway goal, his 14th
of the season, midway through the
last period gave the Boston Bruins
a 5-4 victory over Detroit Thurs-
day night in a National Hockey
League game.
Sanderson took a pass from Ed-
die Shack, who was flat on the
ice at the time, broke in alone on
the net and flipped the puck past
goalie Roy Edwards.
Goals by Phil Esposito, his 20th
and 21st of the campaign, and
Skip Krake got the Bruins off to
a 3-0 lead early in the first period.
Detroit's Norm Ullman made
it 3-1 before intermission.
Then, after Kent Douglas and
Don Awrey traded second period
goals, Ullman and Gordie Howe
tallied within 67 seconds to tie it
up. It was Ullman's 20th and
Howe's 19th goal.
76'ers Acquire
Johnny Green
PHILADELPHIA (P)-The Phila-
delphia 76ers of the National
Basketball Association announced
the acquisition yesterday of jump-
ing Johnny Green from the San
Diego Rockets for undisclosed cash
and a 1968 third draft choice.
Green, a 9-year veteran of the
NBA, brings a career average of
12.3 points a game and some 700
rebounds a season. Recognized as
one of the game's best leapers,
Green has averaged -13.9 points
this season for the expansion ba-
bies at San Diego.
Jack Ramsay, 76ers' general
manger, said Green "gives us add-
ed strength up front and insurance
in case of injury to front liners.
He's an experienced player and
strong rebounder and we antici-
pate periods of concerted offensive
and defensive power from him."
The 6 foot-5 Green played his
college basketball at Michigan
State, joining the New York
Knicks in 1959 and playing with
them for six years.
He was the center of a multi-
player deal in 1965, which sent
Green to Baltimore and center
Walt Bellamy to New York. Green
played with the Bullets three
years and last spring was taken
in the expansion club draft by
San Diego.
The 76ers, leading the Eastern
Division by two games over Bos-
ton, have been shorthanded of
late because of the injury which
forced guard Larry Costello to
retire, an ankle injury to their
important sixth man, Billy Cun-
ningham, and lesser ailments in-
curred by other members of the
squad. Coach Alex Hannum has
been meeting the rugged NBA
schedule and its incessant travel,
with prolonged use of seven play-
ers.
The 34-year-old Green should
give the defending NBA cham-
pions more depth and enable Han-
num to rest some of his troops.

The victory pulled the Bruins
within two points of the Eastern
Division-leading Chicago Black
Hawks, who were idle Thursday.
* * *
Oscar Nets 40
CLEVELAND-Oscar Robertson
scored 40 points and kept the Cin-
cinnati Royals just out of reach
with four free throws in the last
nine seconds for a 120-116 Na-
tional Basketball Association vic-
tory over the Boston Celtics last
night.
The Royals took the lead for
good with 5:46 left in the game.
Jerry Lucas hit a°long jump shot
for a 99-98 lead and Cincinnati
kept a three to four point margin
until the buzzer.
* * *
Leafs Face Stars
TORONTO - The Toronto
Maple Leafs will be seeking their
first victory in a National Hockey
League All-Star game Tuesday
night in the annual classic match-
ing the defending Stanley Cup
champions and top players from
the other 11 NHL clubs.
Goalie Ed Giacomin of the New
Pilote of the Chicago Black Hawks
and Harry Howell of, New York
plus forwards Stan Mikita, Bobby.
Hull and Ken Wharram made the
first All-Star team in 1966-67.
The second team included goalie

Philadelp]
Boston
Detroit
Cincinnat
New Yorl
Baltimore
St. Louis
San Fran
Los Ange
Chicago
San Dieg
Seattle

Eastern Division
Won Lost 1
Shia 32 12
28 13
24 21
i 20 23
k 21 25
16 25
Western Division
32 13
cisco 30 16,
les 22 22
16 29
;a 13 32,
12 35

Pet. Behind
.727 -
.683 2?.
.533 8'l.
.465 111,
.457 12
.390 14 f

.711
.652
.500
.356
.289

21.,
16
19
21

Glenn Hall, now with St. Louis,
defenseman Bobby Orr of the !
Boston Bruins, and forwards
Gordie Howe and Norm Ullman
' N1A

Thursday's Results
Cincinnati 120, Boston 116
St. Louis 108, Baltimore 101
Friday's Games
Detroit at Boston
Baitimoreat Philadelphia
San Diego at St. Louis
New York vs. San Francisco at
Oakland

COLLEGE SCORES
LSU 100, Tulane 91
Marquette 71, Wisconsin 56
Illinois 85, Frincipla, 111!. 73
Dayton 57, St. Louis 56
Virginia 95, Clemson 92
Virginia State 86, Maryland State 73
Rhode Island 81, Northeastern 66

NHL
East Division
W TL
Chicago 20 10
Boston 21 12
Montreal 18 14
Toronto 18 13
New York 17 14
Detroit 17 17
West Division
Philadelphia 18 15
Minnesota 14 15
xLos Angeles 16 21
Pittsburgh 14 19
xSt. Louis 14 20
Oakland 5 25
x-Late game not included.
Thursday's Results
Montreal 4, Philadelphia 2
Boston 5, Detroit 4
Friday's Game
Toronto at Pittsburgh

This Weekend in Sports
FRIDAY
HOCKEY-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Michigan at Western Michigan
SATURDAY
BASKETBALL-Michigan State at Events Building, 1:30 p.m.
SWIMMING-Indiana at Matt Mann Pool, 3:30 p.m.
WRESTLING-Michigan at Northwestern
HOCKEY-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8:00 p.m.

T !
10
6
9
8
8
6
6
8
3
6
4
8

42
36
35
34
32
24

I'ts.
50
48
45
44
42
S 40"

,F

-Attention Fraternity SophomoresI

McNease Idaho Boss;
Gets Four-Year Contract

INTERFRATERNITY

COUNCIL

By PHIL BROWN
The announcement of the ap-
pointment of Michigan assistant
football coach Y C McNease to the
head coaching position at the
University of Idaho climaxed a
hectic round of meetings with
Idaho administrators, both in New
York and out West.
Edward W. Hartung, president
of the University of Idaho, made
the announcement at the NCAA
Coach's Conference in New York
City.
McNease was one of three men
nominated for the job vacated by
the resignation of Steve Musseau,
who vacates his office on February
1.
Hartung and Idaho Athletic
-Director Paul Ostyn selected Mc-
Nease after he had been inter-
viewed on January 4 in Moscow,
Idaho; where the school is located,
and presented him with a gener-
ous four-year contract and free-
dom to gather his own staff of
assistants.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
PHIL BROWN

It will be McNease's first head
coaching job, following his intern-
ship at Florida State, the Univer-
sity of Texas at El Paso, and at
Michigan.
None of the parties involved in
the appointment were available
for comment. Other members of
the Wolverine staff were also at
the conference, as were Hartung
and Ostyn.
McNease is to assume his new
duties on Feb.1, the day Musseau
departs. There is no word yet as to
who will take over the linebackers
and defensive ends on the Wol-
verine squad.
Mrs. McNease told the Daily
that she was "thrilled to death"
about the promotion, noting that
she believes Y C to be "completely
capable" of handling the job.
"I just love that kind of coun-
try, too," she added. "We've lived
all over the country, but we es-
pecially liked El Paso-with all
those mountains.",
"Even our five-year old daugh-
ter is anxious to go," she says.
"She just wants to know when."'

announces

Pe for Junior Officers

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11

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PETITIONS DUE FRIDAY, JAN. 12
1510 S.A.B.

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