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March 29, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-29

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Friday, March 29, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, March 29, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

. . - _
1

IEBUIT OF FiIJA:
ETWapanBliveMss Romney Raps Move
SNe Warplane Believed MlissingTo KillOpen Housing

in rIgmng u ver iNor
SAIGON 0P) - The possibility ; 1,500 mile an hour plane had made
that a multimillion dollar F111A, a successful debut in the air war
newest warplane in the U.S. over North Vietnam, hitting bi-
vouac and storage areas in the
arsenal, may have been downed in southern panhandle.
North Vietnam overshadowed for A spokesman for the command
the moment the fighting in South declared no details would be
Vietnam. made available on the missing
The U.S. command disclosed plane for security reasons. He de-

only Tuesday that the swing-wing.
Commnm ittee
refuses Funds
For Navy F1Ill

clined to speculate on whether
the plane was lost in combat, hit
by North Vietnamese ground
fire or had mechanical trouble.
Reports in Washington said
the plane's last radio transmission
came over Laos, between Thai-
land and North Vietnam. A search
has failed to find any trace of
the plane or its two man crew,

in V ietnam LANSING ( P) - Gov. George
Romney declared yesterday that
an effort to. sidetrack the open
Valley 25 miles west of the im- housing bill now before the Sen-
I perial capital of Hue. An inten- ate by bringing in another bill
sive enemy build up has been "is a deception, a fraud and anI
progressing for weeks in the absolute sham."
valley.
The intense raids by the Super-
fortresses, the heavyweights of the
U.S. Air F o r c e, underscored
American concern that the North
Vietnamese may unleash an of-
fensive to capture battered Hue,<
from where they were driven af-
ter savage fighting in the lunar~
new year offensive.
Military and civilian officials 'ble e e e y c p ue o u
believe enemy capture of Hue
would be an impressive propa-
ganda victory. Some officers have}
speculated that the North Viet-
namese have withdrawn some
troops from their encirclement of
the U.S. Marine base at Khe Sanh.
The base is 50 miles north of the
valley near the demilitarized zone.
North Vietnamese were on the
move southeast of Hue, and the
U.S. Command said 117 were
killed in three skirmishes Wednes-
day and Thursday. The enemy
was threatening Route 1, the
main highway in North and South !Gov. George Romney
Vietnam.

WASHINGTON (PT--The Senate sources said.
Armed Services Committee yester- A squadron of six F111A's ar-
day refused to authorize further rived in Thailand March 17. After
funds for production or develop- shakedown flights, they went into
ment of the controversial F111B action.
aircraft, the Navy version of the The plane's sophisticated elec-
controversial TFX warplane. tronic system allows it to bomb
The Air Force version. the targets at night or in bad weather

Opponents of the bill, which
forbids discrimination in most
real estate transactions, are at-
tempting to have the Senate deal
first with another measure on lo-
cal housing ordinances.
"An absolute sham." Romney
repeated of the substitute bill. "All
it does is support the status quo."
If the local bill passed first, the ..'
opponents of state wide open
housing could then argue that
further legislation was not neces-
sary.
"This is a red herring to con-
fuse the issue,'said open housing
backer Sen. Coleman Young (D-
Detroit .
Legislators behind the move'
Romney said, are resorting to de-
ceptive measures to keep the Sen-
ate from voting on the open
housing legislation.
Equal Rights
The governor called a special A
news conference to air his views ' ANTONIN NOVOTNY, ousted as
on the issue. rives at Prague Castle today for t
"I'm sure the people won't be Committee of the Czech Commu
misled," he said. "There is no the last of his power today,
substitute for granting all citi- maneuvering for the Czech pres
zens equal rights in all areas. We
need a state wide fair housing
bill as well as local efforts in this
area." Czeclh R
The passage of a fair housing
measure by the Legislature is theI
most important step that could be N
taken at this time to help ease
racial unrest, Romney said.
If an pitant Threatbill does PRAGUE -A-Czechoslovakia's
not pass, the governor said, "mil- Communist reformers yesterday
itants are planning to use this as proposed a 72-year-old general,
a means of stirring up trouble." described by party sources as a
Romney said he is prepared to "'sort of Czechoslovak Eisen-
call Senate Republican leaders to hower," for the vacant post of
the executive office to urge pass- president. He has strong Soviet
age of the bill, if necessary, But backing.
he added that bi-patrisan support The party's Central Committee
is needed to get the measure nominated Gen. Ludvik Svoboda
through both houses of the Legis- by secret ballot and then called on
lature. the Communist-led National Front
--

F111A, has seen combat action;
one was reported yesterday to have
been lost in Southeast Asia.
The Fll was developed under
the direction of former Secretary
of Defense Robert S. McNamara,
who envisioned a basic plane for
use by the Air Force and, with
modifications, by the Navy.

with as much precision as a pilot
who can see his target in day-
light. The bad weather over
North Vietnam the past few days
would not discourage the F111A.
In South Vietnam, B52's for
the second straight day dropped
tons of bombs on North Vietna-
mese positions in .the A Shau

I

THE CONCERT SOUND
OF
HENRY MANCINI
WITH
ORCHESTRA OF 40
SATURDAY, MARCH 30
UNIVERSITY EVENTS BUILDING
8:30 P.M.
TICKETS AT HILL AUD. BOX OFFICE
9 to 4:30 $3.00,$3.50, $4.00
TICKETS SATURDAY AT EVENTS BUILDING

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS THE
EXCLUSIVE U.S. ENGAGEMENT of
STRATFORD
NATIONAL THEATRE OF CANADA
SHAKESPEARE'S
with
DOUGLAS RAIN as Bottom
MARTHA HENRY as Titania t
Directed by JOHN HIRSCH Designed by LESLIE HURRY
APRIL 1 -6, 1968
Evening Performances - Mon. through Sat. 8:30 p.m.
Matinee Performances - Thurs. & Sat. 2:30 p.m.
ALL PERFORMANCES IN
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

--Associated Press
president of Czechoslovakia, ar-
the plenary session of the Central
nist Party. Novotny relinguished
opening the door to political
sidency.
eformers
Svoboda
party, which includes some non-
Marxist elements, to suppport him.
The National Assembly-parlia-
ment--will vote on a new presi-
bent Saturday to replace An-
tonin Novotny, the hard-liner who
resigned under pressure last week.
Svoboda's election was near cer-
tain.
Party chief Alexander Dubcek
told the committee that Svoboda,
a Communist, was "the most suit-
able person at the present time
who could help in the unification
of our nation and consolidating
the internal political situation."
He received 105 of 107 Central
Committee ballots.
The presidency carries with it
designation as chief of state.
Largely ceremonial until now, the
post could become more impor-
tant with the reworking of gov-
ernment promised by the reform
leadership.
Svoboda, a commander of Czech
forces fighting alongside the Com-
munist army in World War II,
left government in 1951 and was
since active chiefly as a military
historian.
Novotny, whom Dubcek ousted as
party chief last January, lost the'
last shred of his political power
at the meeting. The official Czech'
press agency CTK said he sur-
rendered his posts on the party's
Central Committee secretariat and
presidium.

Soviet Trade
Tax Stopped
J3Y .Congress
SPro-Administration
Vote Bans Factory
Bond Tax Exenption
WASHINGTON 'P--In two ad-
ministration-supporting votes yes-
terday the Senate approved a ban
on tax-exempt bonds used to fi-
nance private factories and block.
ed a move to place a tax curb
on trade with Communist na-
tions.
But it failed to reach a deci-
sion on a proposal to impose a
10 per cent income tax surcharge
linked with a $6 billion cut in fed-
eral spending.
Under debate is a House-passed
measure to extend automobile and
telephone excise taxes which are
scheduled to drop sharply on
April 1. Under previous legisla-
tion, the-7 per cent levy on autos
is to drop to 2 per cent and the
10 per cent impost on phone serv-
ice is to go to 1 per cent.
The House adjourned Thurs-
day until noon Monday.
However, since the Senate
skirmishing centers on side issues
and there is no substantial op-
position to extending these levies,
the Internal Revenue Service an-
nounced it plans to continue col-
lections at current rates in belief
that the extension will be voted
retroactively in the near future.
Reversing an action taken ear-
lier, the Senate voted 50 to 32 to
bar after Jan. 1 the issuance of
tax exempt municipal or state
bonds for the purpose of financing
industrial development by private
corporations.
The Treasury Department al-
ready had issued an executive order
halting issuance of such bonds-
known as IDB's--effective March
15. But in a Tuesday test the Sen-
ate voted 51 to 32 to continue the
tax exempt status of such bonds
indefinitely.
The IDB's are used to raise
funds for industrial plants and
are retired through rentals paid
by the benefiting company. Be-
cause the bonds are issued in the
name of a local or state govern-
ment unit, interest on them is tax
exempt and, in effect, enables the
corporation to raise funds at a
cost substantially lower tharl
through private borrowing.
On a 44-38 roll call, the Sen-
ate rejected an amendment by
Sen. Karl E. Mundt, (R-SD),
which would have .imposed a 20
per cent added tax on all the in-
come of any company which ships
goods to a Communist nation that
is supplying goods to North Viet-
nam.

C311 GUILD r _

"Marlene Dietrich!
y6ur name at first the sound
of a caress, becomes the crack
of a whip. When you wear
feathers, and furs, and plumes,
you wear them as the birds and
animals wear them, as though
they belong to your body.. .
THERE comes to us (all sails
flying) a frigate, a figurehead,
a Chinese fish, a lyre-bird,
a legend, a wonder: a friend of
France MARLENE DIETRICH!'
-from Jean Cocteau's
Saluation to Marlene
Dietrich.
See her yourself!
in the films directed by
Josef Von Sternberg!
7:00 & 9:05
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
75c

:_1

U

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announCes

-

4,4C UAC Summer Flight No. 4
MAY 20 - AUG. 12
TWA JET N.Y.-London-Paris-N.Y.
IS DEFINITELY FLYING

THE
apa

REPERTORY
COMPANY

TODAY:
SHANGHAI EXPRESS
(1932)

I

For information ---$
Call 662-4431 EXT. 23 23:
or Rebate if
Stop in at UAC offices flight full
SOME SEATS STILL AVAILABLE !

3 NEW PRODUCTIONS
SEPT.17-OCT. 27
S CHIEDULE
er. 8 P.M. 8 P.M. 8 P.M. 8 P.M. 8 P.M. 2:30 PM 8:P.M.
Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Sun.
We Eves. Eves. Eves. Eves. Eves. Hats. Eves.
Sept. A TUES. A WED. A THURS. AFRI. A SAT. A SUN. A SUN.
17-22 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series
sept. B TUES. B WED, B THURS. B FRI. B SAT. B SUN. B SUN.
24-29 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series
Oct. A TUES. A WED. ATIHURS. A FRI. A SAT. A SUN. A SUN.
1-6 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE EVEMING
Series Series
Oct. B TUES. B.WED. B THURS B FRI. B SAT. B SUN. B SUN.
8-13 Series Series Serien Series Series MATINEE EVENING
Series Series
Oct. A TUES. A WED. A THURS. A FRI. A SAT. A SUN. .
15-207 Series Series Series Series Series MATINEE e VNIG
Series Series
Example: A THUUSDAY SERIES performances are Sept. 19 Oct. 3, Oct.7l'
Plas noe ha A TU SDA ERIES performncs ar o ecessaril
opening night performances'. ALL PERFORMANCF 7XTWNDELSSOHN ntTRE
APA SUBSCRIPTION
NOW ON SALE WEEKDAYS 10-1, 2-5
AT PTP TICKET OFFICE,
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
81th and FOX EASTERN THEATS
Final Week F0X VILLGE
375 No. MAPLE RD..769-1300

Mon.-Thurs.
7:00& 9:00

1.

FRI. 7:00-9:00-11 :00 SAT. 3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00-11 :00
SUN. 1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00

NOMI NATIONS.!
" BEST PICTURE
0 BEST ACTOR DUSTIN HOFFMAN
® BEST ACTRESS ANNE BANCROFT
JOSEPHE.LEVINE s BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
MIKE NICHOLS KATHERINE ROSS
LAWRENCE TURMANX 0 BEST DIRECTOR
PROOUCioN 4, MIKE NICHOLS
! BEST SCREEN
PLAY
S BEST
CINEMA-
- I ~ .. .~TOGRAPHY

Box Office Regular Student
Price' Full Price Subscribers Subscribers
Single Seat Three Plays 15% Saving 25% Saving
,Orchestra 13 Rows AA-L $6.00 $18.00 $15.30 $13.50
Orchestra 10 Rows M-W 5.00 15.00 12.75 11.25
Balcony 4RowsA-D 5.00 15.00 12.75 11.25
Balcony . 4Rows E-H 4.00 12.00. 10.20 9.00
Balcony 2 Rows 1-K 3.00 9,00 7.65 6.75
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday Evenings, Sunday Matinees and Sun-
day Evenings

I

CINEMA II
Presents
"THE CONNECTION"
Playwright-Screenplay by
JACK GELBER
The endless aloneness and desperate
apathy of the drug addict
. .the first hipster drama to be seen in New
York . . . the only and balanced work ever created
by a Beat Generation writer."
Robert Brustein, New Republic
".. ..a farrago of dirt, small-time philosophy, empty
talk and extended runs of 'cool music'."
Louis Calta, New York Times
"Gelber has tried to locate man's position in the
universe not cleverly, but well, with a method in-
spired by one jazz musicians use, when the indi-
vidual soloists take turns improvising on a more or
less agreed-upon theme ...we are conscious of a
non-wish-fulfilling truthfulness seldom found in the
theater ... it is probable that the sense of working
against phoniness which is now the play's greatest
virtue would not have existed had Mr. Gelber chosen
to write his play in a more audience-satisfying
I

Orchestra 13 Rows AA-L
Orchestra 10 Rows M-W
Balcony 4 Rows A-D
Balcony 4 Rows E-H
Balcony 2 Rows i-K

Box Office
Price
Single Seat
$5.00
4.00
4.00
3.00
2.00

Full Price
Three Plays
$15.00
12.00
12.00
9.00
6.00

Regular
Subscribers
15% Saving
$12.75
10.20
10.20
7.65
5.10

Student
Subscribers
25% Saving
$11.25
9.00
9.00
6.75
4.50

I.D. No._
(If student)

..- -.. .-. ..- -.. -. -
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NOTES:
1. Your priority purchase is
for the full APA season
subscription.
2. Tickets will be mailed
Sept. 6. Please enclose a"
self-addressed stamped
envelope.
3. If yourSeptember address
is uncertain, let us hold
your tickets for personal

ANNE BANCROFT,.. DUSTIN HOFFMAN KATHARINE ROSS
CALDER WILLINGHAM ANDBUCK HENRY PAUL SIMON
SIMON AOGARFUNKEL LAWRENCE TURMAN
D R(C T EDBY

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