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March 27, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-27

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Wednesday, March 27i - 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

rhI

Pistons
By The Associated Press
For Jimmy Walker, the Detroit
Pistons' number three guard and
a graduate of Providence College,
its a chance to play against his
old idols.
"These guys are practically my
uncles, I've known them so long.
That's why it's so great to whip
them," he said after Monday's
game, when the Pistons knocked
off the Boston Celtics 126-116.
After Boston had won the first
playoff contest 123-116 on Sun-
day, Detroit turned tiger to even
the best-of-seven series.
Each club has claimed a vic-
tory to square the series, and the
fourth-place Detroiters have beat-
en the Celtics in two of their last
three meetings.
Detroit won ten of its last 13
games during the regular season
,~to nail down the final playoff
spot, and beat the Celtics in the
final game to snub Cincinnati.
1 oston player-coach Bill Russell
he *s to improve his rebounding
tonight when the teams meet at
i Tiers Win,
Cards Lose
On the strength of Mickey
Lolich's strong pitching and Bill
Freehan's power hitting, the De-
troit Tigers blanked the Washing-
ton Senators 8-0 at Lakeland
Florida.
The Detroit attack came alive
in the first inning when Bill Pree-
han stroke a three run homer off
loser Phil Ortega, and continued
on in later innings with the help
of Mickey Stanley's three singles
and Bernie' Allen's three errors.
The Washington, attack was
successfully stifled by Mickey Lo-
lich in the first three innings,
Bob Reed, a University of Michi-
gan product, in the middle three,
and Les Cain in the final three.
Pitcher Cecil Upshaw singled
with the bases loaded and two out
in the bottom of the ninth inning
Tuesday. driving in the winning
run as Atlanta defeated Baltimore
2-1.
Atlanta starter Dick Kelley
pitched seven innings and gave up
only four hits to run his spring
training record to 21 innings of
work with eight hits and no runs.
Rookie righthander Francisco
Carlos pitched five strong innings
Tuesday as the Chicago White
Sox scored their second victory
of the spring, beating the Oakland
Athletics 4-0.
Chicago had its biggest rally in
the fith when it scored two runs
on a walk, an error, and singles
by Walter Williams and Rocky
Colavito.
Manny Mota hit a two-run
homer and Jim Bunnings pitched
a one-hitter over eight innings in
leading the Pittsburgh Pirates to
a 2-1 exhibition baseball victory
over thee Boston Red Sox.
Mota's first-inning homer fol-
lowed a single by Gene Alley, but
Gary Waslewski limited the Pi-
rates to four hits in the first seven
innings.
Consecutive doubles by Bud
IIarrelson and Ken Boswell with
one out in the ninth inning gave
the New York Mets a 1-0 victory
over the St. Louis Cardinals Tues-
day.
Steve Carlton pitched the first
six innings for the Cardinals, al-
lowing just one hit, and Nolan
Ryan pitched the first four in-
nings for New York, giving up
just three hits and striking out
4y six.

Scores
Cincinnati 7, Los Angeles 2
New York, N, 1, St. Louis 0
Atlanta 2, Baltimore 1
Pittsburgh 2, Boston 1.
Minnesota 4, New York, A, 2
Chicago, A, 4, Oakland 0
Detroit 8, Washington 0
San Francisco 3, Chicago, N, 2
California 6, Cleveland 2

Try foi
the Boston Garden in the third
playoff game.
Russell, who hauled down 34
rebounds in the first game, ran
into foul trouble on the Detroit
floor and finished with only 14'
for the contest.
Both teams are in fair physical
condition for tonight's game, al-
though the Celtic's Bailey Howell
is still feeling the effects of a
battle with the flu.
The Philadelphia 76ers left lame,
appear to have recovered, and the
defending champions should be at
full strength tonight for the third
game in their eastern National
Basketball Association semifinal
series with the New York Knicks.
The best four-of-seven game se-
ries is 1-1. The 76ers won the
opener at home and the Knicks
evened the score at Madison
I Oquare Garden. The third game is
slated for the Palestra, one of
three home floors used by the
76ers as a result of the flyaway
roof at the Spectrum.
The layoff since New York's
Saturday victory has given tk.e
76ers' invalids some healing time.
Wilt Chamberlain has been run-
ning on an injured toe, Hal Greer,
favoring a gimpy knee and Luke
Jackson, rebounding with a sore
hand.
Coach Alex Hannum of the 76ers
has stressed rebounding in prac-
tice drills this week. He was upset
over New York's domination of
the boards against Chamberlain,
Jackson and Chet Walker. Phila-

Two
delphia also is preparing for the
Knicks' zone press, used so ef-
fectively against the 76ers in late
season play.
"We've got to keep them from
converting offensive rebounds into
field goals," said Hannum.
The only New York casualty so
far has been Cazzie Russell, in-
jured slightly during the Knicks'
128-117 victory Saturday night.
Willis Reed of the Knicks is the
top scorer in the series with a 31-
point average. Dick Barnett is av-
eraging 25 and teammate Walt
Bellamy 20. Chamberlain has av-
eraged 30.5 and Wally Jones, the
76ers' playmaker, 20.
Thehseries statistics so far f a-
vor the Knicks. New York has
outrebounded 118-106 and been
more accurate at the foul line 80.6
to 74.6. Philadelphia holds a slim
edge in field goal percentage 46.1-1
45.1, dropping 94 to 92 for New
York, with each taking 204 shots.
The Knicks' zone press has
forced the 76ers into numerousG
turnovers and given the hot-shoot-
ing Philadelphians fewer shots. In
every regular season game against
New York that the 76ers got off
more than 100 shots, Philadelphia
won. Each time Philadelphia was
under 100 shots from the field, t
lost, including the second game of
this series 96.
The fourth series game is1
scheduled for Madison Square
Garden Saturday afternoon, the
fifth here Sunday afternoon, and
a sixth, if necessary, in New York
Monday night.

Spa rtans Will Continue Protest;'
Agree to Attend Gym Playoff

Michigan State has agreed to
participate in the Big Ten play-
off to determine the conference
representative to the NCAA play-
off, but will do so under protest.
The Spartan coach, George
Szypula, had stated earlier that
he would boycott the playoff to
be held this weekend at William
College, Downers Grove, Illinois.
Along with Michigan State's
announcement, came a comment
by Szypula. "I feel this meet is
a great injustice to Michigan

State because we won the Big
Ten championship meet," he ar-
gued.
He then referred to a section
in the NCAA gymnastics rule book
which declares that the confer-
ence representative to the na-
tional tournament should be de-
cided by the team score on the
second day of the conference
meet.
Michigan State won that meet
with a 190.25 score as compared
to 188.0 for Michigan and 185.85

for Iowa. Because of dual meett
results, the three tied for the con-
ference championship.
In his comments, Szypula failed
to note that the gymnastics
coaches voted last fall not to fol-
low the NCAA format, and that
the conference had been informed
by the NCAA that it could choose
its representative by any method
it considered appropriate. The Big
Ten athletic directors had decid-
ed on a playoff to break the tie.

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RUDY TOMJANOVICR

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RUDY FOURTH IN BOUNDS:
Big Ten Gains Prestige in INCAA'

Center for Russian and
Eastern European Studies
and Dept, of Economics
Lecture

By BILL McFALLI
Big Ten basketball is alive and
thriving.
For a while it seemed as if the
Big Ten was becoming a stock
joke at sports banquets, with its
unspectacular finish against other
teams in the country during the
football season, and its anemic
showing at the outset of the 1967-
68 basketball season.
This proved to be grossly er-
roneous as the Western Confer-
ence came through with one of the
most exciting cage races ever as
Ohio State and Iowa battled down
to the wire.

Ex-Gridder Loses Suit With Crisler

Midpoint Metamorphosis
Iowa and Purdue fell before
lowly Michigan at the end of the
season, as the "underdog" teams
started pulling upsets that put a
loose nut in the high-geared title
hopes of the first division leaders.
The playoff for the right to
represent the conference at the
NCAAA's was a thriller, with the
Iowa Hawkeyes, unable to bounce
back from their defeat at the
hands of Dave Strack's Wolver-
ines the week before, coming out
on the short end of an 85-81 score
against the Buckeyes.
With Ohio State figured to go
two or maybe three games in the
tourney, many heads turned as
the Bucks kept right on winning.
They kept on until North Caro-
ina, eventual finalist and second
place. finisher, beat them in the
semis at Los Angeles last Friday.
Michigan Leaders
The Wolverines had a few stars
of their own as the final statistics
for the conference were compiled.
Sophomore Rudy Tomjanovich
was fourth in the Big Ten, re-
bouding department with 167,
which figured out to be 14 per
cent of the total carroms.
In league scoring, Dennis Stew-
art was seventh with 265 points,
Tomjanovich followed with a close
264, while last seasons's captain,

Jim Pitts, was ninth with 262.
Leading scorer was Purdue's
Rick Mount with 416 points while
Wisconsin's Joe Franklin was tops
in rebounds with 194.
University Charter
Caledonian Atrva ys
FLY TO
from
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$230 Roundtrip
May 20 to Aug. 19
Also, Wait Lists For:
' ~May 9to June 19
June 27 to Aug. 22
CALL 761-2348
5-7 P.M.

ALEC NOVE
Visiting Prof. from Univ. of Penna.
"Ideology and Economic Reform
in the Soviet Union"
Wed., March 27 4:10 P.M.
Aud. D., Angell Hall

IL

LANSING - A former Univer-
sity of Michigan football player
of two decades ago, contended
he was wrongfully barred from
the Michigan varsity in 1948.
The Michigan Court of Appeals
upheld a lower court ruling that
the statute of limitations prevent-
ed James D. Jackson, now an at-
torney, from collecting.
Named as defendants were Fritz
Crisler, retiring in June as U-M
athletic director, and Bennie Oos-
terbaan, now director of public
relations for the University.
In 1948, Crisler had just step-
ped up from football coach to
athletic director and Oosterbaan
was the new young football coach.
Jackson contended in his suit
that the two U-M athletic figures
"intentionally and fraudulently
overlooked and disregarded plain-
tiff's prowess on the field by sel-
ecting players of lesser ability" . '
"thereby depriving plaintiff of an
opportunity to launch a success-
ful career in varsity and profes-
sional football and other oppor-
tunities."
He further contended his ability.
to succed in various professional
endeavors after graduation were
adversely affected by the wrongs
allegedly done to him at the Uni-
versity of Michigan.
In 1948, Jackson said, he played
left half on the first team during
Pete Cornell has been elected
to succeed Dave Porter as
Michigan wrestling captain. A
former state high school cham-
pion at 154, Cornell has com-
piled an overall 36-10 record in
the last two years. In 1967 he
finished as runnerup in the Big
Ten and third in the NCAA at
167. This season he placed third
in the Big Ten and fifth at the
NCAA Meet.
spring practice. Jackson said he
refused an offer to transfer to
UCLA that year and then did notI
receive an invitation to return to{
U-M fall practice.
Jackson said he still returned
to fall practice at his own expense
and although he was put on de-
fense against the first team, was
not allowed to eat with the team
and was denied football tickets.
Jackson said the coach and
athletic director "conspired to dis-
regard and ignore plaintiff's foot-

that he should think so highly of
us."
Jackson, who later graduated
from Wayne State University and
was admitted to the Bar in 1961,
acted as his 'own attorney in the
case.
The circuit court and appeals
court did not make a judgment
on the merits of the case although
the appeals court opinion said,
"We note the defendants cited
BULLETIN
The Michigan diamondmen
went down to their fifth straight
defeat last night at the hands
of Arizona State, 1-0. The
losing run was earned off an
error by Chuck Schmidt. Mich-
igan's Dave Renkiewicz record-
ed the loss giving up five hits
in seven innings on the mound.

DRIVERS

AN ECONOMIC STUDY TOUR OF EUROPE
will be conducted this summer by a professor of international relations
and a professor of economics from the graduate school of a well-known
university. A two-week course in contemporary European problems (in
English) at the Sorbonne will be supplemented by seminars in economic
and political problems of Western and Eastern Europe- led by eminent
scholars and statesmen (such as Ludwig Erhard, former Economics Min-
ister; Prof. John Jewkes, of Oxford; Enoch Powell, MP; Archduke Otto
von Habsburg; Jacques Rueff, former Economics Minister, France) in 10
countries. Social activities with European students will be included in
this non-regimented tour. For more information, write, Dept. 104, A.P.S.E.,
33 Chalfont Road, Oxford, England.

TO WISCONSIN
FOR McCARTHY

BEN OSTERBAAN
ball abilities by telling him he was
academically unqualified."
Crisler, recalling the case, said
Jackson was not allowed on the
varsity team only becasue he was
scholastically ineligible.
Ossterban, speaking of Jackson
said, "Oh, I remember him va-
guely ... He was not much of an
athlete; at least not as good as
he thought he was . . . I guess
this thing started over a year
ago; we didn't give it much at-
tention because there wasn't much
to it.
"He did receive a reserve award
in '49; there was no prejudice on
our parts - either Fritz or me .. .
we never cut anybody from the
squad - that's always been our
policy . . . obviously Fritz and Ij
didn't haxe ten million bucks be-
tween us, so we were flattered

If you are driving with a full car or

affidavits in connection with their
motions denying what the plain-
tiff alleges."
The appeals court affirmed a
verdict by Wayne County Circut
Judge Charles Kaufman that
there was no cause for action be-
cause of the statute of limitations.
The statute of limitations re-
fers to the period of years allowed
by law for the filing of such
damage suits.
Join
The Daily
SportsStaff

have room for riders call:

761-

1918, 663-6039,

or 663-9885

to

obtain lodging

information, work

I

SPAGHETTI
DINNER
TIME

assignments, and directions to pre-
cinct headquarters. Please do not
leave for Wisconsin without con-
tacting one of these numbers. If
you need a ride call the above num-
bers.

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