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March 26, 1968 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-26

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Tuesday, MorGh 26, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

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WEST COAST CAMPAIGN:
Kennedy Appeals
For. Youths' Votes

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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By The Associated Press
# Sen. Robert F. Kennedy made
an all out bid yesterday for the
support of the nation's youth in
his drive for the presidency.
"I stand for the spirit of
youth," Kennedy said. "And that's
where I think America should
stand-and that is why I run for
President."
Thus Kennedy announced ex-
plicitly his position in the contest
with Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy
for allegiance of the young in
their parallel campaigns to wrest
the Democratic nomination from
President Johnson.
* The New York Democrat's ad-
dress was prepared for a youthful
audience at San Fernando Valley
State College.
Kennedy got a cheering wel-
come from thousands of Negroes
World .News
Roundup
By The Associated Press
MILAN, Italy - About 3,000
s students clashed with riot police
last night in a vain attempt to
reoccupy Milan's University of the
Sacred Heart.
Thirty-seven policemen and 15
students were injured in the
clashes, Milan's fiercest since stu-
dent uprisings struck Italy this
w month.
The students pelted the police-
men with eggs, wood and fruit.
The university was shut by the
rector last week after students
staged a mass sit-in, protesting
what they termed antiquated
teaching methods and facilities.
Police said 59 students were
arrested.
* * *
PHILADELPHIA - The USS
New Jersey, in the reserve fleet
more than 10 years, left today for
sea trials designed to whip the
45,000 ton battleship into fight-
f ing trim for duty off Vietnam.
At 6 a.m., the New Jersey, once
nicknamed the "Mighty Avenger,"
cast off her lines at the Phila-
delphia Naval Shipyard and tugs
nosed her down the Delaware
River toward the Atlantic.
* * *
WASHINGTON - All four of
the nation's giant copper pro-
ducers have now reached tenta-
tive wage hike agreements with
their unions but it still is not
known when thousands of workers
will return to their jobs, ending
an eight month strike.
Anaconda Co. and American
Smelting & Refining Co., an-
nounced Sunday tentative settle-
ments covering more than 15,000
strikers. But they said local issues
still must be ironed out at their
28 mines and factories spread
over a 14 state area.

later yesterday as he visited the
Watts area of Los Angeles, scene
of a massive riot in 1965.
The Watts appearance was his
first test of Negro sentiment since
he announced his candidacy a
week ago. His Negro audience
was smiling and enthusiastic.
Some waved signs calling for a
"New Image-Kennedy in '68."
* Hunting Republican votes,
Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy carried
his challenge of President John-
son to the cradle of the GOP
yesterday-and right into a head-
quarters of Richard M. Nixon.
The Minnesota Democrat, who
also has been referred to as a
leader of a "Children's Crusade"
because of the youth of many of
his supporters, talked to senior
citizens, a Rotary Club and an
association of lady bankers.
In his appearances in Fond du
Lac and Ripon, McCarthy was
obviously courting Republicans to
cross over and vote Democratic
in the Wisconsin primary April 2,
to show their irritation with
President Johnson-or with both
Johnson land Nixon, the GOP
front runner.
The Wisconsin primary has
been stripped intentionally of
party discipline and thus Repub-
licans may vote Democratic and
vice versa.
* President Johnson said yes-
terday he will fight off election
year political attacks and continue
building a better society for all
Americans while standing firm in
Vietnam.
"The America we are building
would be a threatened nation if
we let freedom die in Vietnam,"
Johnson told a cheering labor
convention. And he asked help
in combatting poverty, crime,
disease and hunger at home.
"We will do what must be done.
We will do it at home and do it
wherever our brave men are call-
ed upon to stand," Johnson said.
Defending the record of his ad-
ministration, Johnson said "We
did make progress" in helping
millions of Americans rise from
poverty, providing federal aid for
school children, medical care for
the elderly and better jobs at
higher pay for the nation's
workers.
"These are the mighty founda-
tions that we have put into place
and we are not going to sit by and
let them be torn down in a par-
tisan, political election year,"
Johnson said.
Johnson did not refer to his
Republican opponent, former Vice
President Richard Nixon, or the
two Democratic senators opposing
him for renomination, Eugene J.
McCarthy of Minnesota and Rob-
ert F. Kennedy of New York.
"But I sometimes wonder why
we Americans enjoy punishing
ourselves so much with our own
criticism," he said.

The Daily Official Bulletin is as.
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
tal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
TUESDAY, MARCH 26
Day Calendar
Center" for Programmed Learning
for Business Seminar-"Management
of Behavior Change": Michigan Union
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
School of Music Recital - Piano Ma-
jors: School of Music Recital Hall,
4:30 p.m.
Professional Theatre Program - The
Roar of the Greasepaint, the Smell
of the Crowd: Hill Auditorium, 8:30
p.m.
Honors Steering Committee - Pet-
itioning for central and all subcom-
mittee positions until March 27. Picki
up petitions in 1210 Angell Hall.
Undergraduate Summer Research in
Medicinal Chemistry: NSF grants are
-available to undergraduates who have
completed a year's course in organic
chemistry. Apply by April 1 to Medi-
cinal Chemistry, 2521 Chemistry-Phar-
macy Bldg., telephone 764-7366.
Center for Russian and East Euro-
pean Studies and the Dept. of Econ-
omics Lecture, Prof. Alec Nove, Profes-
sor of International Economics, Uni-
versity of Glasgow, and Visiting Pro-
fessor, University of Pennsylvania,
"Ideology and Economic Reform in the.
Soviet Union," 4:10 p.m., Wed., March
27, Aud. D, Angell Hall.
IST Ocean Engineering Seminar
Series - Vice Admiral Charles B. Mar-
tell, USN (Ret.), until recently Director
of Antisubmarine Warfare Programs in
the Office of the Chief of Naval Oper-
ations, will give the eighth seminar,
entitled "Ocean Engineering Aspects of
Antisubmarine Warfare," Thurs., March
28, at 2:30 p.m. in the Main Lecture
Hall of the Chrysler Center for Con-
tinuing Engineering Education.
Colloquium in Education - Arthur
Pearl, Director, Division of Remedial
Education, University of Oregon, "The
Irrelevancy of the Schools; What Does
the Future Hold?" Thurs., March 28,
131 Bus. Ad. Bldg., 4:00 p.m.
Department of Philosophy Lecture -
Prof. Jaakko Hintikka, University of
Helsinki, "Does Ought Imply Can?"
Thurs., March 28, Aud. D, Angell Hall,
4:10 p.m.
Foreign Visitors
The following foreign visitors can be
reached through the Foreign Visitor
Programs Office, 764-2148.
Mr. Masao Arita, Mr. Minoru Ota-
guro, Mr. Shintu Ishiguro, Mr. Junji

Miura, Professors of English, Japan,
March 25-30.
Prof. and Mrs. Owen Horwood, Prin-
cipal and Vice-Chancellor, University
of Natal, S. Africa, March 27-29.
Mr. Sawai Puramanni, Chief, Elec-
tion Supervision, Dept. of Local Ad-
ministration, Ministry of Interior,
Thailand, March 27 - April 5.
Dr. F. A. MacNab, Psycho-therapy
counselling, Australia, March 30-
April 5.
Dr. Yngve Ericsson, Prof. and Chair-
man of Cartiology, Karolinska Insti-
tute, Sweden, March 27.
Dr. Norah Regan, Officer of Health,
School of Medicine, Manchester, Eng-
land, March 27-29.
Doctoral
Examinations
John Joseph Manning, Jr., English
Language & Literature, Dissertation:
"John Hayward's The First Part of the
Life and Raigne of King Henrie the
'11," on Tues., March 26 at 2 p.m. in
the W. Council Rm., Rackham. Chair-
man: E. H. Creeth.
David Dale Roy Welker, Philosophy,
Dissertation: "Semantic Contrast," on
Tues., March 26 at 4:10 p.m. in Rm.
2219 Angell Hall. Chairman: J. M. E.
Moravcsik.
James Arthur Schafer, Physiology,
Dissertation: "The Association of So-
dium and Potassium Ions with the
Transport of Neutral Amino Acids in
the Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cell," on
Tues., March 26 at 3.30 p.m. in Rm.
4001 E. Medical Bldg. Chairman: J. A.
Jacquez.
SGC
The approval of the following stu-
dent events becomes effective after
STU DENTOU RS
EUROPE
12 Countries
9 WEEKS
JUNE 24-AUG. 27
$999
Canadian Pacific
DC-8 Jet
(based on GIT fare)
Call
BILL LOMBUS
764-0819

the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has be-
come effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in rooms
1001 and 1546 of the Student Activities
Building.
Voice-SDS - Film showing, March 31
and April 1, 7 p.m. - 11:30 p.m., An-
gell Hall, Aud. A, & Arch. Aud.
(Continued from Sunday)
AND FURTHER: That, to be pre-
pared in case the Board of Regents
should attempt eto reinstitute their
arbitrary control of student use of
automobiles off-campus, Council here-
by 1) establishes a Select Committee
for Planning for the Defense of Stu-
dent Rights to study what tactics -
including park-ins at the entrances
of parking lots, disruptive sit-ins in
administrative offices, and massive
stallins on State Street - might be
called for to defeat such an attempt
by the Board of Regents; and 2) ap-
points Bob Neff Chairman of the Com-
mittee and allows him to choose the
other members of the Committee.
Approved: That the Councilhereby
endorses the Graduate Assembly res-
olutio nof March 20, 1968 requesting
that the University substantially in-
crease the funds assigned to Graduate
Assembly.
Received: Official Report of SGC
Select Committee on Calendaring from
Jon Rosen, Chairman.
Approved: Priorities Schedule for
Calendaring:
Class I-
1. Priorties shall be granted to aca-
demic activities sponsored by academic
departments.

2. Fraternity and Sority Rush.
3. Priority shall be granted to events
of more than one day on the week-
end involving both day and evening
activities, sponsoring by Student Or-
ganizations or groups of Student Or-
ganizations.
4. Priority shall be granted to events
sponsored by University Organizations
to be held under the suspices of aca-
demic departments and student or-
ganizations or groups thereof, both
involving acheduling of evening ac-
tivities of more than one day on the
weekend and requiring the same fa-
cilities.
5. Priority shall be given to non-
academic activities sponsored by aca-
demic departments.
6. Priority shall be granted to Stu-
dent Organizations or groups of Stu-
dent Organizations wishing to spon-
sor events involving evening activities
on one day of the weekend in Hill
Auditorium or in the Events Building.
CLASS II
7. Events of one day on the week-
nd involving scheduling of evening
activities not in Hill Auditorium or
in the Events Building.
8. Events of more than one day on
the weekend involving scheduling of
only day activities.
z9. Events of one day or more than
one day involving scheduling of day
and/or evening activtities during the
week.
ELIGIBILITY SCHEDULE
BASED ON PROCEEDS
1. Proceeds to be used entirely for
programming for the benefit of the
entire student body.
2. Proceeds to be used for the bene-
fit of the specific sponsoring groups.
(Continued on Page 7)

GET WALLED . . . .
Blow yourself up to Poster Size
Send us any black and white or color snapshot. We'll blow it up to
2 ft. by 3 ft. (Poster Size). $4.75 for one, $3.00 for each additional
from same photo. Inquire as to quantity prices, group rates, and
special projects. Original photo returned. Add 25c for handling.
OPERATION BLO-UP, INC.
636 Pennsylvania Ave., S.E.
Washington, D.C. 20003
TEAM TEACHING
NON-GRADEDNESS
WANTED!!I
Outstanding teacher candidates who are interested in team teaching,
non-gradedness and individualization of instruction. Teach in a for-
ward looking, rapidly growing, Dayton, Ohio suburban district. Ele-
mentary and secondary certified teachers will teach in open space,
fully carpeted, air conditioned middle schools which are a part of
one of Ohio's and the nation's leading school districts. Interviewing
on this campus Monday, April 1, 1968.
WASHINGTON TOWNSHIP SCHOOLS
INDIVIDUALIZED INSTRUCTION
LEN QUENON
t..I Believes-
BUILDING CODES
MUST BE ENFORCED
x 'DEMOCRAT SECOND WARD

A POLITICAL STUDY TOUR
OF EUROPE
will be conducted this summer by a professor of international rela-
tions in the graduate school of a well-known university. A two week
course in contemporary problems (in English) at the Sorbonne will
be supplemented by seminars with leading scholars and statesmen
(such as Ludwig Erhard, Enoch Powell, MP, Prof. Count Bertrand de
Jouvenal, Archduke Otto von Habsburg) in 10 countries. Social acti-
vities with European students (Oxford Balls, etc.) will be included in
this non-regimented tourfor intelligent students. For more informa-
tion, write Dept. 101, A.S.P.E., 33 Chalfant Road, Oxford, England.

Paid Political
Announcement

Vote Monday, April 1

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SPAGHETTI
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Is Sunday, March 31, at SDT sorority,
1405 Hill St. from 5:30-8:00 P.M.
PRICE: $1.25 ALL ARE INYITEDi
BRING YOUR FRIENDS!

call

"One trunk to a car" has been sedan dogma
ever since sedans began.
(And why not? Isn't it obvious that a car can't
have two trunks? After all, how can you add a
trunk without subtracting an engine?)
Well, you know how we worry about dogma.
So our new VW Fastback Sedan not only has
two good-sized trunks, but-since even a Volks-
wagen can't get along without an engine- an
engine.
(What we did was to make theengine only l6
inches high and tuck it underneath the rear trunk.)
Of course; while our Fastback may be the first
two-trunked sedan, it's still a Volkswagen.
So it can make a couple of more stotements
most other sedans can't make. $21 79
Gas mileage: up to 27 mpg'The price: POS
But best of all, with this car what you gain in
function you don't lose in style. Shut both trunks
and you have a dashing little fastback.
Believers in the "one trunk to a car" dogma
can call us heretics.
But at least we're good-looking heretics.

NEJAC TV RENTALS

662-5671

You're trained and work on routes where people have
bought Good Humor Ice Cream for years . . . no in-
vestment...everything supplied.
HOW YOU QUALIFY FOR INTERVIEW
1. Minimum age 18.
2. Need a valid driver's license . ..and must be able
to drive a clutch transmission.
3. Be in good physical condition.
Sign Up Now For Our Campus Visit
Ask your Summer Placement Director or Student Aid
Officer to schedule you for our campus visit or write to:
GOOD HUMOR, Dept. A.
800 Sylvan Avenue
Englewood Cliffs, N. J. 07632

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WILL BE MICHIGAN'S
WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE 1969?

with

CONTACT Margie
leave them in the
the SAB.

Stern 769-3290 with your suggestions, or
writer-in-residence box in the SGC area of

PETER BOWEN
GRADY TUCK
BOB FRANKE
THE RAZOR'S EDGE
AND MORE!

WEDNESDAY
8:00 P.M.
FRIDAY and
SATURDAY
THE PURITAN
DILEMMA

Ann Arbor
2575 S. State
Open Mon. 'Thurs. Till 9 PM.

761-3200
Tourist Delivery Avoilol"*'

INTERVIEW _
DATE: April 1 and 5

An Equal opportunity Employer

(M/F)

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READ AND USE DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS

UNION-LEAGUE

SYMPOSIUM '68
NEW MOODS OF DISSENT present
ARTHUR R. MILLER

ENGINEERING COUNCIL

Michigan Law Professor

speaking on

Proudly Announces the Appointment of the
Following Committee Chairmen:

"Computer Information and Personal Privacy"

UNION BALLROOM

8:00 P.M.

PERSONNEL

GERRY SIVULKA

. . .

. . . .

and

ALUMNI RELATIONS

. . JAMES KAVANAUGH

CAREY McWILLIAMS

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