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January 12, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-01-12

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 12, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAE ThEE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 1Z, 196S THE MICHIGAN DAILY

A A'AX jAAKVA ll

J

NFO Withholds
Market Products
For Price Raise

HEART TRANSPLANTS:
Blaiberg Experiences Setback;
Kasperak Continues Progress

CORNING, Iowa (P) The
National Farmers Organization,
pledging "no price, no produc-
tion," launched yesterday another
campaign to boost agricultural
prices by withholding farm pro-
ducts from market.
The initial target is grain, to
be followed at later dates by so
called withholding actions on
meat, milk and other farm com-
modities.
President Oren Lee Staley said
s the action "is designed to shut
down the American agricultural
plant ,until our members get a fair
price for their products."
The militant farm group, some-
times called "the angry young
men of agriculture," said it is
urging its members in 30 states
Oto stop selling grain as the be-
ginning step.
The NFO conducted six previous
withholding actions, major ones
on livestock in 1962 and 1964 and
on milk last March, The boycotts
resulted in some violence.
Tons of milk were dumped in
fields and streets as part of the
milk action.
The NFO claimed some success
in each action, but processors
discounted the claims.
Staley said previous actions
have forced processors to recog-
nize the NFO as the bargaining
" agent for its members which has
resulted in some increase in,
prices.
"The prices have always been
higher after an action than they
were before," he said.
Although the NFO claims it has
members in 30 states, the actual
membership number is kept sec-
ret. "This enables us to bargain
with processors from a position of
strength," said Staley.

Staley said non NFO farmers in
all states involved are being asked
to join in the latest boycott "to
protect their interests. I believe
the support will be tremendous."
He said specific instructions
calling for non violence in con-
nection with the action have been
issued to all members.
Asked whether a market boy-
cott at this time would not hurt
farmers even more, Staley re-
plied: "We can't afford to with-
hold-and we can't afford not to.
If we sell at present prices, we
will be the losers anyway, with no,
chance of recovery."
One western Pennsylvania NFO
leader, James Wenzel of Saeger-
town, said the grain actions will
hurt farmers in his area immed-
iately since they must buy grain
for their cattle.
But he said his members are
going along because they expect
prices on milk-their chief pro-
duct-to go up eventually.
The NFO has set a market price
of $1.50 per bushel on corn and
$2.25 per hundredweight on other
feed grains. All other grains would
be held for comparable prices.
The price of corn currently is
about $1.00 per bushel, soybeans
$2.40, wheat about $1.30 and grain
sorghums about $1.90 per hun-
dredweight.
During last year's milk boycott,
the U.S. Justice Department filed
an anti-trust suit against the
NFO, then dropped the suit in
return for an agreement that the
NFO would inform government
officials of any further market
boycotts.
Staley said the Agriculture and
Justice Departments were told in
advance of the latest action.

By The Associated Press
Despite minor complications in
South Africa the conditions of
the world's heart patients around
the world, continued to improve
yesterday.
Doctors at Groote Schuur Hos-
pital yesterday removed fluid that
developed around the transplant-
ed heart of Dr. Philip Blaiberg
and said they "do not take a ser-
ious view of this complication."
It was a setback, nevertheless,
for the 58-year-old retired dent-
ist, who became the world's third
human heart transplant patient.
A hospital bulletin said "the
patient's condition is not as good
today as yesterday."
The hospital said formation of
fluid in the pericardial sac was
not a sign Blaiberg's' body was
rejecting the alien heart. A mem-
ber of Dr. Christiaan N. Barnard's
transplant team said development
of fluid around the heart was not
uncommon in open heart surgery
cases.
Doctors said Blaiberg is in bet-
ter shape nine days after the
operation than the .first heart
transplant patient, Louis Wash-,
kansky, who developed pneumo-
nia and died 18 days after his
Dec. 3 operation.
Mike Kasperak, who received aG

transplanted h e a r t Saturday
night, continued to improve yes-
terday but remained on the cri-
tical list at the Stanford Medical
Center, his doctors reported.
Heartbeat, blood pressure and
pulse were normal and he was
breathing spontaneously, without
a respirator part of the time.
He was still being fed intra-
vanously, however.
Dr. Norman E. Shumway, chief

of the team of surgeons who
made the transplant, said Kas-
perak's condition would be con-
sidered critical for several weeks
because of the possibility his body
may reject the implanted tissue.
He had suffered a total heart
failure and was dying when the
heart was removed from Mrs.
Virginia White, 43, victim of a
brain hemorrhage, and trans-
planted to Kasperak's body.

Soviet Prosecutor Demands
'Prison Terms for Writers

-Associated Press
SH-H-H BOOM!
A break in a high-pressure water main in the Detroit suburb of Utica produced a beautiful skyscape
as water shot 100 feet into the air. High winds blew the water another 1,000 feet across the horizon
as water poured out of the 96 inch main at a rate of 1,000 gallons a minute.
HURRIED NEGOTIATIONS:
British Withdawa Prompts
Arab Nations Defense Pact

MOSCOW (A)-A Soviet prose-
cutor asked yesterday that four
young intellectuals be imprisoned
for terms ranging up to seven
years for anti-Soviet propagandaI
and links with a foreign group
seeking to overthrow the Com-
munist regime.
The prosecutor demanded a,

Dobrovolsky, 29, the only defend-
ant to plead guilty and turn
state's evidence. His term could
be cut to a year because of the
time already served.
A year also could be cut from
the seven years demanded by the
prosecution for Yuri Galanskov,
28, charged with anti-Soviet prop-

year in prison for Miss Vera Lash- aganda and currency violation,
kova, 21, charged with violating Five years were demanded for
the law by typing manuscripts Alexander Ginsburg, 31, who has
the prosecutor labelled as anti- acknowledged compiling a book
Soviet. on the closed 1966 trial of satir-
The prosecutor asked a two ists Andrei D. Sinyavsky and Yuli
year sentence for poet Alexei M. Daniel.

LONDON (P) - Five Middle The Americans has hoped for
Eastern oil states were reported at least two things:
urgently pondering a new defense 1. That the British would have
pact yesterday after hearing of delayed any decision to quit
Britain's provisional decision to Southeast Asia at least until the
quit her Persian Gulf bases by Vietnam war had approached a
1971. conclusive stage or a phase of
Senior diplomats said the high- negotiations.
ly secret moves, initiated by Iran, 2. That the British would have
have Britain's support. stayed on in the Gulf at least
The Iranians are even bringing until the purpose of Russia's
such hostile neighbors as Iraq and
Bahrain into the picture, naval buildup in the Mediterra-I
They hope to head off another
fierce power contest in the stra-
tegic area. Other countries in- Wr d 1
volved, according to the inform- ord e T
ants, are Saudi Arabia and Ku- ,
wait.
A Foreign Office minister, Go- By The Associated Press
ronwy Roberts, returned Friday GENEVA-The governments of
from the Gulf region, where he Israel and Egypt have agreed to
has been warning local monarchs a general exchange of prisoners of
and sheiks to expect an early an- war, the International Red Cross
nouncement of Britain's with- Committee announced last night.
drawal. It said the exchange was to take
This is due in Parliament next place soon at Ismailia, the midway
Tuesday as part of a massive point on the Suez Canal ceaseE
package of spending cuts design- fire line.
ed, once and for all, to restore

nean had been clarified and the
over all situation, especially on
the Arab-Israel front, had im-
proved.
But some British authorities
have been arguing that Russia's
naval power buildup is being ex-
aggerated. The estimated 50 So-
viet warships in the Mediterra-
nean-compared with 12 a year
ago-can in no way compare in
firepower with the American 6th
Fleet, in Britain's view.
s 'Roundup
The allies then listed 190 dead, in-
cluding 67 Americans, and said
they had killed 626 Viet Cong and
North Vietnamese soldiers.
WASHINGTON - British For-
eign Secretary George Brown said
yesterday North Vietnam's most
recent offer to negotiate represents
a "significant move."
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"Gallic Comedy. .. Spirited Frolic
for Adult Audiences!"-Daily

Poland Expels U.S. Aide
For Intelligence Activity

WARSAW, Poland (;P) - The
P o lis h' Communist government
charged yesterday that army at-
1 taches of the U.S. and Canadian
embassies were caught "carrying
out intelligence activities." _
The American was ordered to
leave Poland before Jan. 16.
He is Lt. Col. Edward H. Metz-
ger, 42, of Quincy, Mass., on as-
signment in Warsaw since May
1966.
The Polish accusation, carried
by the Polish Press Agency, PAP,
said Metzger and the Canadian
attache, Lt. Col. Kenneth I. Jef-
terson, attempted to photograph
a military establishment on Jan. 4.
In Washington, the State De-
partment's press officer, Robert
J. McCloskey said: "We are con-
sidering what action should be
taken." This could mean expul-
sion of a Polish representative in
the United States.
In 1966, Poland and the United
#States, in a tit for tat exchange,
each expelled three attaches.
An official statement by the
U.S. Embassy, making no mention
of Jefferson, said Metzger was
walking along a major thorough-
fare in Bydgoszcz in northern
Poland, "was apprehended at gun
p point by military personnel, de-
tained against his will, denied
permission to telephone the
American Embassy, and forcibly
searched."
The statement said the U.S.,
government, here and in Wash-
ington, protested this "flagrant
r violation of the immunity of an
American diplomatic officer.
HI-Fl STUDIO
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"At the time of his apprehen-
sion," it added, "Col. Metzger was
on a trip in an area where
American diplomatic personnel are
permitted to travel without re-
striction."
The PAP said the account
given by the U.S. Embassy was
"contrary to the facts and to the
documented proofs at the disposal
of the Foreign Ministry."
Metzger, who was declared
persona non grata said he plans
to leave Warsaw Sunday with his
wife and son.
The Polish Press Agency said
the "unallowed activities" of Col.
Jefferson were brought "firmly"
to the attention of the Canadian
Embassy and "further conse-
quences are under consideration."

Britain's solvency.
Other British retrenchments
will include a total military pull-
out from Malaysia anid Singapore
by 1971 and a cut, or cancella-
tion, of the order of 50 American
F111 swing wing strike bombers.
Possibilities of modifying all, or
some, of these decisions were
under discussion in Washington
by Foreign Secretary George
Brown and Secretary of State
Dean Rusk.

SAIGON - Casualty statistics tsULIe.auU1Ue es.
from battle actions a year apart statement by North Vietnamese
reflect an intensification of the Poreign Minister Nguyen Duy
Vietnam ground war due in some Trinh contained parts. which were
degree to revived Communist "not so encouraging."
quests for the initiative.
Spokesmen announced yester- PORT SAID, Egypt-The Suez
day that 466 of the allies including Canal Authority told its depart-
184 Americans-about the recent ments and workshops Thursday
average-died last week in combat to prepare for clearance operations
in which they killed a record 2,868 to release the 16 ships trapped
Communist troops. since June 5-10 Arab Israeli war.
In contrast, the first week of The operation will begin in a
January 1967 was relatively quiet. few days, an official source said.

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AH EPRODUCEDI BY yDIRECTED BY
starring ELSA DANIEL " LUIS SANDRINI - MARIA ANTINEA - EDuaRDO BORRAS s DANIEL TINAYRE
distributed by Joseph Brenner Associates

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A MRK ROBSONDAVID WEBARI PRODUCTION and not intended.
STARRING GUEST STARS
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