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March 22, 1968 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-22

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Friday, March 22, 1,968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Friday, March 22, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

apoplexy
doug heller

BASEBALL OPENER

Wolverines

Hit

Western

Trail

'i

DO AWAY WITH THE
PHYSICS DEPT.
EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is the text of SGC president Mark Crick-
ity's speech of March 20, 1970 at Crisler Field House.
As you all know, SGC's purge inside the University of all ele-
rhents that are not legitimate academic undertakings, began in the
fall of 1967, with a drive to end all classified war research at Michi-
gan. Although 'it was an extremely rough fight, success was granted
to us.
Shortly thereafter, SGC was also able to rid the campus of all
the perfidious ROTC courses.
This was followed by the dissolution first of the Big Ten athletic
conference, and then by an end to all athletic scholarships. The
athletic department, noting that it could now no longer compete on
even a slightly successful basis because of this, and also that it was
a heavy loser financially, ended intercollegiate athletics altogether.
The department agreed that intercollegiate athletics were not a
legitimate academic undertaking, but asserted that intramurals were
also not a legitimate academic undertaking, and ended those also.
Soon we were able to do away with UAC, the Michiganensian,
and Graduate Assembly. Due to an unfortunate accident, the wise-
guy who wanted to do away with SGC was found lying face down in
the Huron River.
Later, we began our now famous investigation of the College
of Engineering. We found that the college largely produces engineers.
This, we allowed, was not bad in itself, but we decided to find out
what engineers do. We found out that the work of some engineers
was useful and teaching them was a legitimate academic undertak-
ing. We found that some engineers help make bombs and teaching
them was not a legitimate academic undertaking. But alas, the two
distinct types of engineers could not be separated. We could not get a
* commitment from each engineer on what he would do once, he
graduated.
Thus we had to make a decision. We could see that we could not
do away with all types of engineering, so we used as a guideline
only those types that were potentially dangerous. As a solution, we
took a lead from our most prestigious neighbor to the north, which
now gets 20 per cent more appropriations than we do, and changed
the College of Engineering to the College of Agriculture.
But it is time to think back on the implications of our work.
When classified research was eliminated, most of our young, inven-
tive minds in the scientific fields migrated to other campuses.
In fact, the physics department was left with one assistant
professor trying to disprove the laws of gravity and two teaching
fellows to run the whole department.
The problem with this set-up is that physics on the level of
Newton have been considered generally a closed issue for at 'least
a decade or two. The assistant professor in charge of the department
knows he's in the minority, but says he will persist along this line.
There is a serious question, however, on whether he will be given
tenure, as he has published absolutely nothing on his specialty.
Courses in the department now include physics 125 and 126
with all others deleted in the 1970-71 catalogue. Hence, there will be
no-one at Michigan who will be able to major in physics since there
is nobody to teach the required number of hours.
In this context, we have investigated with the help of The Daily,
whether the two physics courses as taught are a legitimate academic
undertaking. At this point the question is highly dubious. At the
present time, all high school seniors are required to have physics on
the level of 125 and 126 in order to gain admission to the University.
However, the available teachers are not considered qualified enough
to teach more of an advanced course.
Me-anwhile, the departments of chemistry and astronomy have
4 had to compensate for the physics void by giving their own auxiliary
courses in the physics field to be used as cognates. Unfortunately,
none of the chemistry or astronomy professors specialize in physics,
thus causing these courses to be basically out of date.
Our new campaign, necessitated by the facts, is to do away with
the physics" department because it is not a legitimate academic
undertaking.

By JOEL BLOCK
"I'll be satisfied with a 4-6 rec-
ord for our first ten games of the
season.",
You might expect the above
statement to have come from the
mouth of newly-crowned New York
Met Manager Gil Hodges.
But it didn't.
It was said by Wolverine As-
sistant Baseball Coach Dick Ho-

nig; and after a quick look at the Monday and Tuesday with the Sun
team he's going to face, you know Devils.

he wasn't kidding.
The fact is that the Michigan'
baseball team begins its season to-
night in Tempe, Arizona at 9:30
EST against the best college team
in the country, Arizona State.
The Wolverines will also have
to sweat though (latest tempera-
ture: 65* and rising) a Saturday
doubleheader and two single games

From there the Wolverines will
take a short excursion to Tucson
where they'll begin immediately
another five-game series, this time
with Arizona, the nation's seventh
best team.
"With the loss of our number
one pitcher, Geoff Zahn, to the
Los Angeles Dodgers, we're left
with an unproven pitching staff,",

'Grappiers Stunned in NCAA;
Porter, Corn ell Remain Alive

Special To The Daily
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. --
Michigan's wrestling team, which
had finished second in the nation
last year, qualified only two grap-
plers for championship competi-
tion in yesterday's first round
NCAA action.
Heavyweight Dave Porter and
Pete Cornell, at 167-pounds, both
third-place finishes in 1967, are
the only Wolverines left in the
main brackets after what assist-
ant Michigan coach Rick Bay
called "a disappointing day all
aound." Two other Wolverines
were eliminated completely, while
three others have very slim
chances of wrestling back in the
consolation brackets.
It.was the favored schools who
dominated all early action, as Ok-
lahoma State qualified ten men
for quarter-finalfcompetition,
while Iowa State and co-favorite
Oklahoma qualified eight and
seven men respectively. Defend-
ing champion Michigan State ad-
vanced six of their number.
Cornell began his day with a
pin of North Carolina State's Ben
SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
St. Louis 4, Pittsburgh 0
Atlanta 7, Philadelphia 0
Detroit 3, Cincinnati 0
Oakland 5, Chicago (A) 4
Washington 2, New York (N) 1
Houston 11, Boston 1
Minnesota 7, Los Angeles 6
New York (A) ' 5, Mexico City
Tigers 4
San Francisco 14, Cleveland 3
Chicao (N)1, California 0
NHL
Boston 8, Chicago 0
Toronto 5, Detroit 2
NIT SEMIFINALS
Kansas 58, St. Peter's, N.J., 46
Dayton 76, Notre Dame 74, over-
time

Steve Rubin at 123 and Fred
Stehman at 160 advanced by a
1:52 pin and a 9-5 decision, re-
spectively. But both lost in the
evening on spectacular come-
backs. Rubin was ahead by two
when, with less than a minute to
go, his opponent, Bill DeSario of
Cortland State, gained a take-
down and predicament for four
points and the win.
Yet Stehman's was even more
amazing. With only 29 seconds to
go, his opponent, Dave Wiendl of
Wilkes College, managed two des-
peration moves, got two take-
downs and two predicaments, won
nine points, and grabbed the
match 12-9.
Other first round action found
137-pounder Geoff Henson los-
ing 10-9 to Martin Willigan of
Hofsta on a riding time point;
Lou Hudson being overwhelmed at
130 pounds, 10-3, by North Cen-
tral College's Ed Jackson; and
Bill Waterman, at 177, being de-
cisioned 5-4 by Verlyn Strellner
of Iowa. Both Waterman and
Hudson later saw their conquer-]
ers conquered, making them in-
eligible for wrestle-backs.

said Honig. "We're hoping our hit-
ting and our solid defense will be
able to back up our question-mark
pitching."
The Michigan offensive attack
should be potent. They led the
Big Ten in hitting last season with
a .294 team average, way ahead of
Tonight's NCAA basketball
semi-final game between Hous-
ton and UCLA will be televised
at 12 midnight on WJBK,
Channel 2.
second-place Minnesota's .277 bat-
ting mark.
Leading the Wolverine's and the
rest of the Big Ten in individual
batting was outfielder Andy Fisher
with .459, 67 percentage points
ahead of the second-place batter.
Other top hitters for Michigan
last year were Bud Forsythe (.333)
and Jim Hosler (.304).
Steadiest player last year was
junior third baseman Glenn Red-
mon, who played every inning of
every game and ended up with
a .295 batting average for the
entire season.
Honig says Head Coach Moby
Benedict has given the starting
nod tonight to Dave Renkiewicz,
big 6'3" junior righthander from
Wyandotte. Junior Jack Hurley
and sophomore Steve Evans, both
also 6'3" righthanders, are sched-
uled to go in Saturday's double-
header.
Benedict's bull-pen ace figures
to be Larry Guidi, a 6'3" senior
from CrotonyFalls, New York.
Guidi, a righty, was second to the
departed Zahn in e.r.a.elast year
with a measly 2.21. He had no
won-loss record, appearing in 11
games for 201/2 innings.
PAUL CAMELET
Master Tailor
For Men and Women
Alterations & Remodels
No longer with Camelet Bros.
1103 S. University
above the drugstore 663-4381

UN ION-LEAGUE
PLAY
Pool,
GIRLS

PETE CORNELL

Harry in 7:22, and followed this
with a convincing 9-1 decision of
Gene Denisar from Indiana.
Porter, meanwhile, was seeded
third in an impressive field of
heavyweights, ,and gained a bye
in the afternoon's preliminaries.
But it took him only 2:54 to dis-
pose of Oregon's Henry Muller
via a pin in the evening round.
Michigan did gain two other
wins in first round action, as

DAVE RENKIEWICZ
The Wolverine infield will be ouples
"the best in the Big Ten" accord- Tournament
ing to Honig. All four members-
Redmon at third, Chuck Schmidt .
at short, Forsythe at second and11A
Hosler at first--got a thorough
initiation last year. As juniors they Sa ud
should save the Wolverine pitchers
from several tough situations with
doubleplays.
Sharing the catching duties will Transistors
be senior captain Doug Nelson and
junior college transfer Pete Titone. as
Honig says Titone has been hittingPrze
well in practice so far and could'
get the starting role ahead of foot-
ball player Nelson. If he does, he'll
have the incentive to show up hisU I
home crowd-he went to Cochise
Junior College in Douglas, Ari-
zona.
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7:59 A.M. to 12:57 A.M.
Monday thru Friday
8:30 A.M. to 12:57 A.M.
Saturday
11:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.
Sunday
Red isn't sheriff yet, so
it's still safe to come on over

City

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The walkingest boot in town!

TONIGHT at 7:15 P.M.

WHEN-TODAY-AT 1:40 P.M.
WHERE-Detroit Metro Airport

by MANSFIELD

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followed by
FILMS ON ISRAEL
"Wilderness of Zin"

I

Tracking known clues to ancient life in Israel's
Negev, Dr. Nelson Glueck, famed archeologist and
President of Hebrew Union College, makes one of
the best notable discoveries of our time. Photo-
graphed in Israel during his Negev expedition.
"Leonard Bernstein in Israel"
NnrrrnitA , Mr Rprcin thi film ,ivc uc on in-

SEE the man who dared to join battle with the President of the
United States!
SEE the man whose' New Hampshire victory amazed the world
and changed the course of American political history!
SEE SENATOR EUGENE JOSEPH McCARTHY, the mild-man-
nered professor from the great state of Minnesota at a
GIANT WELCOMING RALLY
to be held TODAY at Detroit Metro Airport (at International Arrivals, out-
side, adjacent to South Terminal). For those unable to arrange car pools,
buses will leave from behind the Union. on Thompson St., at 12:30 P.M. A

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