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March 22, 1968 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-22

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Friday, March 22, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Five

Friday, March 22, 1 9 6 8 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

KING'S MARCH ON THE CAPITAL:
Massive Influx of Poor People
Aims for Congressional Action

College Papers Anti-Jolrnson,
Split Over Kennedy, McCarthy

JACKSON, Miss. (AR) - The
army of poor people Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. plans to lead
into Washington next month will
follow congressmen to the na-
tional conventions in August if
no action is taken before then, a
top King associate said yesterday.
The Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy
told a crowd of 400 chanting,
cheering Negroes here the "Poor
People's Campaign" would not
tolerate adjournment before con-
gressmen "address themselves to
the demands we make."
Abernathy pledged that the
demonstration would be non-
violent.

"We're not going to have a
riot," he said. "The government
knows how to deal with that.
They don't know how to deal with
a non-violent campaign. We are
going to tie up the whole city of
Washington through civil diso-
bedience."
King plans to build a slowly
intensifying confrontation be-
tween the federal government and
a minimum of 3,000 poor people.
Tactics mainly will be the sit-ins
and marches of his southern cam-
paigns. They will be put into play
over a period of weeks, not all at
once.
Plans are flexible enough, or-

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK -- The nation's
largest port remained tied up for
the fourth straight day yesterday,
as 22,000 striking longshoremen
defied a court's back-to-work or-
der.
An estimated 70 ships remained
" stranded in the harbor, at a cost
estimated by shipping circles at
$1.5 million a day. Only five ves-
sels loading military cargo were
worked.
President Thomas Gleason of
the AFL-CIO International Long-
shoremen's Association said he
tried personally to persuade many
of his workers to return to the
piers, but that he failed.
SAN FRANCISCO - An earth-
quake jolted San Francisco yes-
terday at about 1:50 p.m.
There were no immediate re-
ports of damage. The quake was
felt in downtown San Francisco
and as far away as 60 miles to the
south in Santa Clara County.
Oakland and Hayward in the East
Bay area also felt it.
The University of California
seismograph recorded the shock
but an intensity reading was not
available immediately.

LAGOS, Nigeria - Federal
troops have captured the strategic
Niger River market town of Onit-
sha after nearly six months of
bitter fighting, reliable sources
reported today.
Capture of Biafra's second
largest city would open shorter
supply routes to the South for
federal troops fighting to put
down the secession of former
Eastern Nigeria, and give the cen-
tral government virtual control of
the western border of Biafra.
LONDON - Algeria is supply-
ing oil to rebel Rhodesia through
a company partly owned by the
French government, a report in
the Sun said today.
Harold Hutchinson, the pro-
labor newspaper's political corre-
spondent, said details of the leak
in sanctions were given to a pri-
vate meeting of Labor legislators
Wednesday night by Common-
wealth Secretary George Thom-
son with Prime Minister Harold
Wilson's backing.
Thomson said oil for Rhodesia
was sold by the Algerian govern-
ment to the Total Oil Co., which
is owned in part by France.

ganizers believe, slowly to in-
crease the pressure King hopes to
put on the government - all
summer if necessary.
The pessimistic feelings ex-
pressed by some organizers weeks
ago no longer are evident inside
the Southern Christian Leader-
ship Conference headquarters
here.
Support from local organiza-
tions has picked up sharply in
the past two weeks, organizers
said. The SCLC treasury, virtual-
ly empty when King announced
his program late in December, is
getting an increasing flow of
small donations, they said.
Not Developed
And a rumored conflict between
King's people and militants who
do not share their philosophy of
nonviolence has not materialized
so far. The Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee is giving
no aid as an organization, one
SCLC member said, but some
members are helping.
Well before the campaign's Ap-
ril 22 starting date, work is ex-
pected to start on a "New City
of Hope" - tents or temporary
buildings set up on a 30-acre site
and supplied with electricity, sew-
er lines, an outdoor theater, kitch-
ens and parking.
For "a day or two" the new ar-
rivals "will set up the new city
and get settled into it," an aide
said. "Then we'll begin a massive
lobbying campaign in Congress,
visiting congressmen, laying out
demands, telling them how it is."
Three Days
The organizers expect to con-
tinue this for three or four days.
Then, if congressional leaders
still are not sympathetic, they will
begin what King's people call acts
of "moral obedience . . . remain-
ing in the offices of the most ob-
stinate congressmen and depart-
ment heads."
"Moral obedience" actions have
not been decided on, the organiz-
ers said, because people who will
bear the consequences should
have a say in what they are asked
to do.
BUY
A SQUIRT
FLOWER
TODAY on Diag
15c

NEW YORK (Ri - A survey of
college newspapers across the na-
tion shows that editorial endorse-
ments in the Democratic presi-
dential race are predominantly
split between Sens. Robert F. Ken-
nedy, (D-N.Y.), and Eugene J. Mc-
Carthy, (D-Minn.).
But the editorials are in agree-
ment in urging the defeat of Pres-
ident Johnson.
Political observers are closely
following student opinions in the
election after youthful supporters
of McCarthy in the New Hamp-
shire primary were credited with
an influential part in his strong
showing there March 12.
Editorial comments vary from
calling Kennedy's entrance into
the campaign a "malicious display
of political opportunism"-Daily
Illini, University of Illinois-to
praising Kennedy as someone who
can return the nationito the
"ideals of the New Frontier"-The
Spectrum, New York State Uni-
versity at Buffalo.
McCarthy was praised for break-
ing "the somber barriers of apathy
.. and giving hope to a Demo-
cratic party which was rapidly be-
coming a detached, atrophied

I

SAVE
at
STATE DRUGS
State & Packard
25% REDUCTION ON ALL
SUNTAN LOTIONS & CREAMS
Offer Good Until Sunday, March 24

clique of party hacks"-The Daily
Princetonian, Princeton Univer-
sity.
"We feel nothing but admiration
for the courageous Minnesotan
who gave so many students re-
newed hope in a political process
that seemed--and may well be-
incapable of coping with the na-
tion's crisis," said the Harvard
Crimson.
The Crimson gave its endorse-
ment to Kennedy, a Harvard
graduate, and urged McCarthy "to
step aside in favor of Kennedy
who offers the best hope of win-
ning."

In Wisconsin where McCarthy
is now campaigning, three major
college newspapers are ?support-
ing the Minnesota Democrat in
the primary. Editors of the news-
papers say any switch to Kennedy
would not come until after the
April 2 primary.
The Milwaukee Post at the Uni-
versity of Wisconsin said Tuesday
in an editorial endorsement of
McCarthy for the primary:
"As long as the President of
the United States thinks he is
Wyatt Earp, the first thing we
must do is make him check his
guns. Lyndon Johnson must go.

I

a

'' .

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

MARCH 22 & 23

i

MUSIC ANTIQUA
at

r

DOC WATSON
Vanguard Records recording artist
friday $2.00 per person
" saturday 11:45 Show: $1 50
sunday
8:00 P.M.
IpTIBUNRY i2OU01B
330 Maynard

TONIGHT and SATURDAY at 1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.
Tong Dynasty presents:8
HIGH BANDPASS
FILTER CONCERT
Another HAPPENING by a group of Ann Arbor composers, presents
sights and sounds, opera blue rags to stickle musicusa, WAY OUT
WORKS, films, experimental mixture.
AN EVENING YOU WON'T FORGET!
Special Sunday Performance by:
MICHAEL SPALDING of Rochester, N.Y.
Blue-ballads-classical on the 12 string
$1.00-includes refreshments

I

COFFEE HOUSE
605 E. William
Open Daily 9 A.M.-12 A.M.
Performances at 8:30-9:45-11:00
Entertainment charge $1.50
No admission charge during regular hours

M1

MICH IGAN
MEN'S GLEE

GUILD HOUSE

(Chinese)
Friday Evening, March 22nd
6:00 P.M.
For reservations, call 662-5189

I

CLUB

11

Price $1.00

GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe

_ .__ ..
y -
i,

AT

UNION-LEAGUE

UNION-LEAGUE

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SAT U R DAY, MARCH 23

ANNOUNCING THE
PETITIONING FOR

SUMMER COMMITTEE
GENERAL CHAIRMAN

Pitk Up Petitions in the UAC
Offices, Second Floor,
Michigan Union

HILL AUD.

8:30 P.M.

Sa turday,

March

30

From The Manila Times, Friday, June 9, 1967

PETITIONS DUE:
MARCH 25, 1968

BLOCK TICKET

B. POMEROY'S

ORDERS ACCEPTED UNTIL

final extravaganza

"Within the Philamlife Hall last night all was cozy cheer as the
some seventy-strong University of Michigan Glee Club poured
song after song from a wide repertory mainly distinguished by its
bright American character.
"Of the college glee clubs that have come here-Harvard, Yale,
Cornell-the boys from Ann Arbor, Michigan, appear most rep-
resentatively American in their program and style.
"The men from Michigan sing a style reflectively American-
bright, positive, humorous, utilizing only a soupcon of sentiment
--and above all, engaged precisely in the pursuit of excellence.
Be it the traditional Latin hymns, baroque music, traditional
ballads, concert chorales, popular medley, novelty numbers,
Negro spirituals, or varsity songs-each comes off in all its com-
ponent parts precise and polished to an excellent degree.
"As long as romance lives and college boys pursue girls, the
world remains young and croons itself to dream through popular
songs in taste and character as refreshingly American as The
Michigan Men's Glee Club."

The Xth

FRIDAY,

MARCH 22

POOR RICHARD'S
FOLK FESTIVAL

5 P.M.

11

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