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March 21, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Pistons

Wn ,

Clinch

Playoff

Berth

By The Associated Press
BOSTON -- Detroit's hungry
Pistons all but blew the under-
manned Boston Celtics off the
court last night with a 74-point
first half, then hung on for a 125-
116 victory.
The victory clinched the final
play-off berth ,in the National
BasketballbAssociation's Eastern
Division as Cincinnati lost to New
York.
Dave Bing and Dave DeBus-
schere combined for 36 points to
spring the Pistons to a 74-50 half-
time lead over the Celtics, playing
without the services of starters
Bill Russell and Tom Sanders, out
with minor injuries.
Detroit increased the margin to
32 points, 86-54, at the 3/2-min-
ute mark of the second half when,
with Don Nelson and Larry Sieg-

fried scoring 15 points between
them, the Celtics came to life and
cut the lead to 98-79 at the three-
quarter mark.
DeBusschere had 32 points and
Bing 23 for Detroit. Siegfried and
Wayne Embry topped Boston with
[ 23 each.
A Royal Finish
NEW YORK - Jerry Lucas'
hook shot at the buzzer bounced
high off the rim and New York
beat Cincinnati 108-106 Wednes-
day night, eliminating the Royals
from the National Basketball As-
sociation's Eastern Division on
playoff race.
3 Detroit's victory over Boston
gave the Pistons the fourth and
final Eastern playoff berth and
kept the Royals from post-season

play for the first time since they
moved to Cincinnati 12 years ago.
Oscar Robertson led the Royals
in a frantic scramble in the closing
minutes and baskets by Robertson
and Adrain Smith closed the court
to 107-106 with 35 seconds left.

The Knicks regained the ball defensive and signal-calling game
and with three seconds left. Em- for the Knicks, led his team with
mette Bryatit was fouled by Smith 21 points, making his first eight
and sank the free throw. floor shots. Robertson paced the
Cincinnati got the ball to Lucas Royals with 28.
in the corner and his hook shot New York finished the season
narrowly missed. with 43 victories, its highest total
Howard Komives, playing a fine since the 1953-54 season.
'GOODWILL' TOURNEY:
Judo Experts Visit

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NBA Standings
Eastern Division

xPhiladelpllia
Boston
New York
Detroit
Cincinnati
Baltimo:-e

Be-
W L Pet hind
62 20 .758 -
54 28 .662 8
42 40.515 20
40 42 .485 22
39 43 .478 .23
36 46 .440 26

Western Division
xSt. Louis 56 26
Los Angeles 52 30
San Francisco 43 39
xxChicago 28 53
Seattle 23 59
xxSan Diego 15 66
x-(cilnched division title.
xx-Late game not Included.

.683
.634
.524
.346
.280
.185

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SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS
Openings for the following staff positions: Fencing,
Riflery NRA, Tennis, Dance, Waterfront-Head and
Assistants Nature, Music-Piano and Band. Crafts-
Woodwork and Shop, Director of Dramatics. ON CAM-
PUS INTERVIEWS at Summer Placement March 22.

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
Judo is gradually gaining more
followers in America, but we stillI
have a lonk way to go before
they can match the Japanese at
their own game,
This was proven last weekend in
Flint when eight Japanese high
school juniors competed with
American high school students in
the second annual Goodwill Judo
Tournament.
Each Japanses boy met two dif-
ferent American boys (the winners
of the Open Judo tournament

Yesterday's Results
(Last Regulai Season Games)
Pihiladelphia 137, Baltimore 119
Detroit 125, Baltimore 119
New York 108, Cincinnati 106
Chicago at San Diego, inc.

LEN QUENON
Believes:
"CREATIVE SOLUTIONS
FOR
PARKING PROBLEMS"
: -DEMOCRAT

held the previous day) - and the
orientals came out on top in all
16 matches.
But, their trip to the United
States is more than just a chance
to show Japanese superiority in
this age-old sport. They are
spending nearly a week learning
about our country firsthand.
Not only do all eight hold first
degree black belts, two or three
years work, but they are also
"A" students. Grades are as im-
portant in their selection to repre-
sent Japan as their judo ability.
This tournament, aptly titled
"Goodwill," was the idea of the
U.S. High School Judo Association
to give judo enthusiasts of both
countries an opportunity to meet
one another, as well as offer them
a unique kind of competition.
All members of the University
Judo Club are invited to the
workout of the eight Japanese
high school champions this af-
ternoon in the YM-YWCA
Building from 3:30 to 5.
The regular Judo Club meet-
ing will be tonight from 7:30 to
9:30 in the Intramural Build-
ing.

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Sport
Shorts

EDDIE MILES

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Assistant professor of psychol-
ogy, at the University, Sachio
Ashida, who holds a sixth degree
black belt and is a member of the
aforementioned committee, was
the tournament director.
One of the places the visitors
will see (today, in fact) is the
Michigan campus, The Japanese
consider Michigan the number
one university in America, but
were confused by the mention of
Michigan State. Ashida intends
to erase that confusion.

By The Associated Press
MIAMI, Fla. - Effective Friday,
major league pitchers. will not be
permitted to moisten either hand
or their glove while standing in
the 18-foot circle around the
mound, baseball's Rules Commit-
tee said yesterday.
If a hurler does violate the new
rule the batter will be credited
with a ball. However, if a pitch
is made and the batter reaches
first base on a hit, error, hit bats-
man or otherwise and no runner
is put out before advancing at
least one base the violation will
be ignored.
BOSTON - That man you'll
see standing behind home plate
during the American League base-
ball season in blue blazer and
gray slacks belongs in the ball
park.
He's the umpire.
American League headquarters
announced Tuesday the first
change in umpiring attire in more
'than 30 years.
Instead of the traditional col-
or, the boys in blue will be out-
fitted with blue jackets and Mad-
ison Avenue gray slacks.
WASHINGTON - The Internal
Revenue Service says Avery Brun-
dayge, president of the Interna-
tional Olympic Committee, owes
$15,547.59 for 1963 income taxes
resulting from a dispute over char-
itable deductions, U.S. Tax Court
papers showed yesterday.
* * *
LOS ANGELES - "This is true
love," said Bo Belinsky. "We're
going to be married as soon as
we can."
The object of the affections of,
baseball's playboy pitcher is Jo
Collins, 39-24-38, once tabbed
Playmate of the Year by a mag-
azine featuring unclad cuties.

from the seat
q Bill Levis
of my pants
College basketball is heading down the back stretch of its great-
est season in history. Crowds are more plentiful than ever before and
so is the talent.
Houston and UCLA, who face off for the second time this year
in the NCAA semi-finals in Los Angeles tomorrow night, have prob-
ably the two greatest basketball players ever to play college basket-
ball in Elvin Hayes and Lew Alcindor. And these two teams have
possibly several other players who could move into pro basketball
today.
But the season coming to a close this weekend does have
one blemish on its record, a -blemish imprinted by the NCAA
rules committee last summer that must be removed if college
basketball continues to grow. And that is the controversial
"no-dunk" rule.
As passed last year, the new rule states. "Henceforth the bal
must be thrown into the basket. It Will be a violation for the offense
to touch the ball or basket when the ball is in or on the basket
and to touch the ball when any part of the ball is in the cylinder
above the basket."
While the NCAA said the rule was enacted to equate the offense
with the defense and to encourage safety, it seems apparent that
the rule is squarely aimed at the big man whose most deadly
weapon is the stuff.
Second, the NCAA's reasoning just doesn't seem to hold much
water.
The NCAA stated that over 1500 injuries about the back-
board were reported .in 1967. What the august body failed to
report was how many of these injuries were directly the result
of dunking and to whom these injuries occurred.
First, it is very easy to hurt your hand on the backboard when
fighting for a rebound, and secondly, it is also possible for a tall
player to hit his head on the bottom of the backboard when struggling
for the ball.
Furthermore, many coaches, including Michigan's Dave Strack.
have expressed the opinion that most of these injuries, directly the
result of dunking or not, occurred on the high school level. Dunking
injuries, according to Strack, are far from numerous.
Another NCAA argument is that the no-dunk rule equates the
offense with the defense near the basket. This is far from the -case.
It is the defense and not the offense that has the advantage under
the basket.
How many times have you seen an offensive player sit under
the basket for 20 seconds? While an. offensive player is only
allowed to stay in the 12-foot wide lane under the basket for
three seconds, the defensive player has no such restrictions.
Who is equating whom?
Taking away the crowd-pleasing dunk from the tall man on
the court is like taking away the fast break from the speedy guard.
It only detracts from an otherwise exciting game.
There are other and more effective sanctions that can be
imposed on the big man. The three-second lane, now 12 feet wide,
could be enlarged either to the pro width of 16 feet or modified
to fan out gradually from 12 feet at the foul line to 16 under the
basket.
This change would keep the big man farther away from the
basket on offense, forcing him to work on his outside shooting,
But it would also permit the big center to drive in for a dunk
when the lane is clear.
It's been argued that the height of tall basketball players
give them an unfair advantage over their smaller opponents
near the basket. But doesn't the speed and outside shooting of
the small men give them some advantage over their slower,
larger opponents outside?
A good big man is still potent without the dunk, supporters
argue. Hayes is still able to average close to 40 points a game without
it and Alcindor continues to overpower his opponents.
Certainly all of this is true. And because it is, it's one 1 eason
to throw out the rule. If the big man is still a threat without it,
readopting it will not have a tremendous effect in his play.
Still, there are other reasons to revoke the unfair no-dunk rule.
The dunk is a crowd-pleaser, but more important, it is a legitimate
tool of those who can use it effectively.
If you are going to legislate against the tall player because
he can dunk, tt seems just as logical to legislate against the
small man who has good speed and can handle the basketball
effectively.
It appears that the NCAA just wanted to penalize those schools
who had effective tall players. Strack has said that it wasn't the big
schools who favored the rules changes but rather those small schools
who don't have a big man.
This is not the way to defend against the big man.
Rules shouldn't be made to hurt the game, but to help it. The
NCAA rules committee would be getting back on the right track
only by revoking the no-dunk rule.

)o

4

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!
" NO WAITING
* 7 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

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Russ Gibb presents in Detroit
THE GRANDEE SCENE AT THE
STATE FAIR COLISSEUM
8 Mile at Woodward
ERIC BURDON and
THE ANIMALS
THE GRATEFUL DEAD

I

ALL THE SPAGHETTI
YOU CAN EAT
for $1.00
EVERY WEDNESDAY

1

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AuntJumimn U. ITCHE
U..Junction US.23 & 12

SCORES
GRAPEFRUIT LEAGUE
Detroit 1, Houston 2
Pittsburgh 2, Chicago (A) 1
New York (N) 5, Baltimore 1
Boston 6, Philadelphia 1
Oakland 6, Cincinnati 2
Atlanta 8, Minnesota 6
Los Angeles 8, St. Louis 9
NHL
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 2
Montreal 3, Toronto 2
New York 5, Chicago 3

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What NORSMAN MAILER Started
Would you believe
A DIALOGUE ON UTOPIA
by

STUDENT RATES
HI-Fl STUDIO
Component System Planning
OUR NEW LARGER LOCATION
668-7942
121 WEST WASHINGTON ANN ARBORt

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DR. L. B. SLOBODKIN-
noted ecologist
DR. JOHN R. PLATT-
director of the Mental Health Research Institute

Thurs., March 21,7:30 P.M.-Rackham Amphitheatre
v in Cooperation with the
CHALLENGE 68 Department of Zoology

GUYS!
FOR GALS TOO!
Over 5,000 pr. in stock
Western Boots by Durango ... 17.95
No-Iron Button-down
Short Sleeve DRESS SHIRTS ... 2.95

A CONSERVATIVE ON THIS CAMPUS!
And a Friend of William F. Buckley yet?

4

THE APOSTLES

CHALLENGE '68

THE JAGGED EDGE
THE AERE APPARENT
Fri. & Sat. Night-March 22 & 23

presents
WILLIAM RUSHER
publisher of The National Review

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