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March 21, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-21

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Page Two.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, March 21, 1968

jim peters' music
Band: Too Little 'Music'

The Michigan Symphony
Band tries to please too many
people; it's this friendly ap-
proach that mangled their pro-
grams in last night's concert.
I certainly appreciated the
freshness and apparent na-
ivete surrounding the group,
but this willingness to be liked
creates programs which sample
all sorts of orchestral music,
wandering around from era to
era, but which rarely find the
place of music fitting to a band.
Was it for the numerous par-
ents and bussed-in high school
students that last night's con-
cert at Hill Aud. opened with,
of all things the Rossini over-
ture to "La Gazza Ladra?" I'm
sure that conductor William
Revelli realizes the hazards in
any transcription of Rossini for
band. Thie subtle violin wit turns
to mush in clarinets, and the
lack of differentiation between
winds playing wind sections and
winds playing violin sections de-
stroys the delicacy of these

overtures. Certainly the bom-
bast of brass growls through
in the explosions near the end,
and the brass of the Symphony
Band is sharp and loud and
clear, but' still the overture
failed.
After this, Revelli included
another of those pieces which
do not belong in band reper-
toires and repeatedly come off
very poorly because of it. James
Underwood attempted Hummel's
"Trumpet Concerto" accom-
panied by the overly blanched
sound of uninspired clarinets.
Underwood played the first
movement much too slowly, of-
ten out-of-time with the or-
chestra, his trills never quite
succeeded and he lacked any
sense of melodic line closely
tied to rhythm, which is essen-
tial to achieve the bravura spir-
it inherent in these pieces writ-
ten in the galante style of C.
P. E. Bach and early Haydn.
But the reputation of the
Symphony Band is based on

serious work in music for band,
and after everyone had been
placated they eventually played
some good pieces. The whole
middle of their program stood
out in stark contrast to the
trifles of the beginning, and to
the noise of the final offering.
Perhaps best was a "Prelude
and Fugue" by Nelhybel; here
was the knowledgeable control
of masses of orchestral color,
with brass balanced masterfully
against pliant woodwind lines.
The dissonances rose from the
band in huge sweeps, returning
again in varying rhythmic and
tonal disguises. The fugue is
short and fast and wildly full
of life.
The very short piece entitled
"Reflections" by Nixon again
exemplified what I feel is the
only kind of music that can
succeed in the band realm, mu-
sic which draws upon the tools
of brass and woodwinds-their
individual timbres, instead of
the forcing of alien transcrip-
tions which too often fail.
The other soloist in the pro-
gram, Jean Marie Londeix, a
visiting music professor from
France, performed Creston's
"Concerto for Saxophone." His
professional sound and tender
handling of the serene melo-
dies made the piece certainly
enjoyable. In this piece the or-
chestra is much more an inte-
grated component, and the hol-
low sound of clarinet and flute
sounded even better against the
mellow saxophone.
The last piece was the finale
from Kalinnikov's "Symphony
No. 1". Conductor Revelli sta-
tioned the antiphonal brass
choir required in the balcony
of Hill. The sound of band and
choir filled the whole auditor-
ium, and it was lush and ma-
jestic and stirring. But the mu-
sic itself has no real substance,
filled with trite woodwind runs
and trills -- pure pyrotechnics
to send everyone home smiling
and happy.

Feidhamp To Decide Fraternity
Housing Rights on N. Campus
By SHARON KORMAN He claims that there are three Nu plan in which the house pro-
A decision on a proposal to al- possible bites which could be used vides 50 per cent of the construc-
low Tau Delta Phi fraternity to for such a project, the most like- tion cost, and the University loans
build a new house on North Cam- ly one being a site containing the other fifty per cent, repay-
pus is expected in about a month twenty acres of land. able over a fifty year period. Un-
from University housing director Last summer Fitzpatrick talked der this plan, the fraternity would
John Feldkamp. to different groups to encourage pay rent, making the University
If the proposal were accepted, interest in North Campus devel- the owner of the house. Further,
the problems of land location and opment. At that time three fra- the loan would be repaid through
obtaining the $400,000 necessary ternities, Kappa Alpha Psi, Alpha gifts channeled through the Uni-
to build the house may delay the Phi Alpha, and Sigma Alpha Mu versity to the fraternity, thus
start of construction for up to a indicated interest in moving to making them tax-exempt;
year. North Campus. 0 The University could con-
Mark Harris, '69, executive Last April IFC made three pro- struct housing units -and rent
vice president of Inter-Fraternity posals to the University housing them out to groups, a plan simi-
Council, said he is anxious to get office to help encourage develop- lar to the one being considered
a commitment for fraternities on ment on North Campus: for sororities in Oxford Housing.
North Campus. "Too many houses Fitzpatrick said the administra-
have old facilities, and no fra- Allow individual fraternities tion is eager to help fraternities
ternity can last two years in an to purchase land on North Cam- and sororities, and would prob-
apartment while it looks for a pus, as ZBT did seven years ago; ably pursue the plans to help
house. They have to get a house." , Adoption of the Nu Sigma them move to North Campus.
Feldkamp said the major dif-
ficulties in parceling, land on
North Campus are in assigning
sites and deciding what they
should be used for.
He said there were seven sites 1
reserved for fraternities ten years
ago, and the only fraternity that
purchased a lot was Zeta Beta
Tau, currently the only fraternity ALAI N RESNAI S'
with a house on North Campus.
The unused sites were finally used
for Baits Housing.
"Now we have only one frater-
nity interested in land, and we
would have to build roads and
pipes for only that fraternity and
that would involve much money,"
Feldkamp said. He agrees, how-A T
ever, that old fraternity houses
would probably have to be re-
placed, and that one way to ac-
complish this would be for theM ARIENBAD
University to own the houses.
Dan Fitzpatrick, Director of
Student Organizations is in favor
of building a small residential
area on North Campus, but noti ALSO: Chapter 11 -"FLASH GORDON"
just for fraternities.
Aud. A-Angell Half Friday, March 22
7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Saturday, March 23
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The University Musical Society
has announced its 1968-69 sched-
ule, with 22 international presen-
tations slated to appear in the
Society's 90th annual season.
Series tickets are on sale at the
offices of the Society, 665-3717.
Artists and organizations from
10 nations will take part in the
season. The 22 concerts are divid-
ed into 10 Choral Union perform-
ances, a five-part Dance Series
and seven presentations in the
Charniber Arts Series.
. Beginning Oct. 5, the Choral
Union Series starts off with the
Chicago . Symphony Orchestra,
under the direction of guest con-
ductor Istvan Kertesz. The next
concert will be presented by
American pianist Gary Graffman
on Oct. 14. On Oct. 26, the Ba-
varian Orchestra of Munich, con-
ducted by Rafael Kubelik, will
make its first appearance in Ann
Arbor.
On Nov. 14, Metropolitan Opera
star Birgit Nilsson will be pre-
sented in recital,. On Sunday, Nov.
24, violinist Yehudi Menuhin and
his pianist-sister Hephzibah will
present a dual recital.
The second semester schedule
includes: Jan. 12, the Gregg
Smith Singers, a new American
chorus; Jan. 24, the Hague Phil-
harmonic, conducted by William
Van Otterloo; Feb. 15, Bizet's
"Carmen," presented by the Boris
Goldovsky Opera Co.; on March
5, pianist Rudolf Serkin will make
his 13th Ann Arbor appearance.
The last concert in the Choral
Union Series will be the Moscow
State Symphony, led by Evgeni
Svetlanov, appearing for the first
time in Ann Arbor on March 13.
The Dance Series will begin
with Washington's National Bal-
let, appearing Oct. 11 in "Swan
Lake." On Oct. 16, Russia's Mol-

davian Dance Co. will make one
of its first American appearances.
From Poland, the Mazowske
Dance Co. will appear on Nov. 18;
on Feb. 8, the Alvin Alley Amer-
ican Dance Theatre. The series
will close Feb. 26 with the Ballet
Folklorico of Mexico.
The Chamber Arts Series will
feature the following performers,
all 'new to Ann Arbor: Oct. 20,
Madrigalisti di Venezia; Nov. 7,
London's Melos Ensemble; Jan. 5,
British mezzo-soprano Janet Bak-
er; Feb. 1, "Music from Marl-
boro"; Feb. 10, the Israel Cham-
ber Orchestra; Feb. 22; the Co-
logne Chamber Orchestra; and on
March 23, the Orchestra Michel-
angelo di Firenze.
Concerts in the Choral Union
and the Dance Series take place
in Hill Aud., while Chamber Arts
concerts appear in Rackham Anud.

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TONIGHT AT
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DIAL
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