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March 20, 1968 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-20

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday. March 20, 1968

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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CAPTAIN'S REFLECTIONS
Gopher Wins Mark Season for Icers'Lord

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
BilleLord, businessman?
When the senior defenseman
removed his skates for the last
time after the Minnesota play-
off, he gave up the world of col-
lege hockey for the world of busi-
ness.
He bypassed education school,
spending two years in lit school
before transferring into business
administration.
"Sometimes I regret not enter-
ing ed school," he muses, "at
least the coaching aspect. Coach-

ing could never be a full-time job
for me, but I would like to do
something on the amateur level."
It was fitting that his last col-
lege game should be against Min-
nesota - his home state.
Born in Edina, he grew up in
a hockey system that patterns it-
self after Canada. Oddly enough,
he was goalie for the first five
years. "I enjoyed it, until I got
tired of getting shot at," Lord re-
members. So he moved out in
front of the net where "the best
part is hitting people."

Lord's partner for last season
was Paul Domm, while Lars Han-
sen and Phil Gross formed the
other pair. "Two sets are perfect,"
Lord observed, "with a fifth man,
(Craig Malcolmson), for penal-
ties."
In a year where the defense-
men racked up their share of
goals - Lansen actually led the
team in league points - Lord
stresses the need for balance.
"Paul is an offensive defense-
man; I'm a defensive defense-
man," he explains. "Phil has abil-

ities both ways so he can drop I streak at midseason (which in-
back and cover Lars." cluded those four Gopher vie-
There is also a need for balance tories), it was not a happy sea-
between the goalie and defense. son for the club.
Concerning the seeming absence Just like the two years previous,
of blocked shots, Lord responds, the icers fizzled out as the season
"We try and take the man, and came rushing to a close.
let Jimmy (Keough) handle the "We went into the Tech games
shots." with the highest scoring average
Aside from beating Minnesota, in the league,"Lord recalls. "Then
<::;:::::>:::::<:: ":::::: ::>::: ::::::>:<:::::::. e hita scoring slum p In a race
as tight as the WCHA was this
tain of next year's hockey team year, you can't afford to do that.
lta n ttyteanual' hockyeay There were a couple one-goal
last night at the annual hockey losses in a row that broke our
back."

I

Kim Keough for most valuable,
Lars Hansen for most improved,
and Dave Perrin as best sopho-
more.

What NORMAN MAILER Started

Would you believe

A DIALOGUE ON UTOPIA
by
DR. L. B. SLOBODKIW-
noted ecologist
DR. JOHN R. PLATT-
director of the Mental Health Research Institute -
Thurs., March 21,7:30 P.M.-Rackham Amphitheatre

four times, twice in Minneapolis,
the highlight of this year" was
his election as team captain.
"That's my greatest honor," he
agrees. "A college captain is re-
sponsible for the team unity.
There is a diverse group of per-
sonalities that you have to blend
and counter-balance."
Despite the 10-game winning

Lord considers the WCHA the
best league in the country. "Just
look at the records," he dares.
"Cornell won 23 games and got
walloped by our third best team
(North Dakota) in the NCAA
championship.
But he does have a few criti-
cisms. "There are only three de-
cent referees in the league," he
tactfully countered a question on
the officiating.
In regard to the schedule, he
states point-blank, "It's a lousy
league when a team can choose
who it wants to play, when it
wants to play, and how many
games it plays."
in case
you
shave

BILL LORD

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- Agreeing with the WCHA ruling
that bars a player from an extra
league game for fighting, he adds
a reservation, "It leads to more
stick injuries, because the players
won't drop their sticks and really
fight."
Since he grew up under the
Canadian system, playing college
rules, the no checking in the of-
fensive zone didn't affect him.
"But," he continues, "this is the
major drawback to American
skaters entering the NHL."
Two Cents Worth
Adding his two cents to the
"who's better" co'ntroversy, he
observes, "Americans will be of
equal stature in the NHL but not
in the near future, it will take
maybe 50 years. The Canadians
now have more things to do and
concentrate less on hockey.
Lord feels that Don Canham's
appointment to the athletic di-
rector post will help the hockey
program. "Hockey should be im-
proved 100 per cent," he predicts.
I SCORES
Exhibition Baseball
Detroit 13, Boston 3
New York (N) 4, Philadelphia 2l
Chicago (A) 5, Minnesota 4
Houston 1, Los Angeles 0
Washington 7, Atlanta 1
St. Louis 11, Pittsburgh 1
Chicago (N) 5, San Francisco 4
Baltimore 8, Cincinnati 3
Cleveland 4, Califronla 1
New York (A) vs. Mexico City
Tigers at Mexico City (inc.)

the vandal
.. howard kohn
freedom of speech..
1.0..sis, boom, bait
I want to go on record in defense of the right of anyone
to say anything at anytime, as long as they mean what they
say or say what they mean.
Few people do. But there are some notable exceptions.
SHERIFF DOUGLAS J. HARVEY of Ann Arbor was told
he would be in violation of Michigan's Hutchinson Act if he
fired four deputies for trying to form a labor union. Harvey
fired the deputies.
Explained the sheriff:
"I've heard of the law. It doesn't bother ne."
DAVID COSLETT of Dow Chemical Company was talking
about business. Dow holds the military contract for the pro-
duction of napalm.
Napalm is a mixture of polystyrene, gasoline and other
organic chemicals used in making incendiary bombs. Incendiary
bombs have killed and maimed tens of thousands of Viet-
namese people, many of themdinnocent villagers, blackening
them in scorching pain.
Said Coslett:
"We will continue to make napalm even though we are
losing money by doing so. We make it as a matter of principle."
DR. ROBERT PROPHATER, president of Bay City's city
commission, was relaxing after a recent controversial campaign.
He had helped lead a fight against a proposed municipal swim-
ming pool "because Bay City already has a beach at her door-
-step." The proposal was subsequently defeated.
Announced the commissioner:
"I've just surprised my family with some good news. I'm
going to build a heated indoor pool for them."
CHARLES DeGAULLE of France championed a self-made
crusade to nationalize Quebec last fall, against the wishes of
a high majority of its citizens. Now that he's back in France,
DeGaulle has been looking at other problems, specifically the
recent gold crisis.
Said DeGaulle:
"The United States is going to learn to stay out of other
countries' business and not try to export its monetary system
jall over the world."
BOB CERV, a former vagabond outfielder in the majors,
was discussing Dick'Williams. An ex-teammate of Cerv's, Wil-
liams is now manager of the Boston Red Sox, who won the
American League pennant last season. Williams was named
manager of the year for instilling a one-for-all and all-for-one
attitude.
Commented Cerv:
"All I can think of is the year we were at Kansas City
together. It was late in the season and Dick and I were battling
for the team lead in RBI's. He was on second and I hit a
single to right. When I looked up, there he was, sliding Into
third."
THERE'S A moral here somewhere but I don't want to say
anything about it, if you know what I mean.

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