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March 19, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-03-19

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Tuesday, March 19, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Poge Seven

Tuesday, March 19, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Gridders

Hit

Turf
1968 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
September

in Spring

Tune up

Denver, Nodaks Top
NCAA Ice Tourney

By ANDY BARBAS
Spring is a time . . . of birds
and bees . . . of fresh air and
warm weather . .. of spring show-
ers and melting snow .. of mud.
It's a time for grabbing the o1'
baseball mitt, the sprung tennis
racket, the ricketty golf clubs, the
broken shoulder pads.
Shoulder pads?
Today some 80 football hope-
fuls trot out to meet the cry of
spring and of head coach Chal-
mers "Bump" Elliott. They will
plod through rain and mud, block
until the same pains they had all
through last season return, and
wonder just what it all will gain
them.
What all will it really gain
*+them? Last season was called a.
rebuilding year for the gridders.
Is this year to be the same?
Last year, the Wolverines were

hurt by the graduation of 14 otit
of 22 starters. This year. the
losses are less substantial, since
only eight starters won't return.
The greatest depletions have
been in the offensive and defen-
sive lines. As Coach Elliott noted,
"Our major problem will be the
offensive line, as our whole strong
side has graduated."
Gone
This side consisted of split end
Jim Berline, tackle Pete Mair,
guard Ray Phillips, and center
and captain Joe Dayton. The in-
tact side includes sophomore Jim
Mandich as tight end, Bob Pen-
ska who handled the tackle spot,
and guard Bob Baumgartner, who
came in during the season to re-
place Dick Yanz.
The weakened side will be wide
open. Sophomore Bill Harris is
given an, inside edge toward re-
placing Berline. Two other re-

21 California
28 Duke

at Ann Arbor
at Durham

October
5 NAVY at Ann Arbor
12 MICHIGAN ST. at Ann Arbor
19 Indiana at Bloomington
26 MINNESOTA at Ann Arbor
November
2 Northwestern at Evanston
9 ILLINOIS at Ann Arbor
16 WISCONSIN at Ann Arbor
23 Ohio State at Columbus
turnees, John Denzin and Pete
Sarantos, will be given considera-
tion at center.
The offensive backfield is
Michigan's strongest area. All
four starters return, and the in-
coming freshmen might give even
them some competition.
Brown at QB
Dennis Brown returns as quar-
terback. Last year he broke three
Big Ten records after replacing
Dick Vidmer halfway through the
season. When Brown isn't
handling the ball himself, he
usually hands off to all-confer-
ence halfback Ron Johnson.
Johnson led the Big Ten in
rushing with 1005 yards, making
him the first Wolverine in his-
tory tohbreak 1000 yards rushing
in a season.
Sophomore John Gabler proved
an effective receiver for Brown
from his flankerback spot. Garvie
Craw, as fullback, was an excel-
lent blocker.
The defensive line is hurt al-

The Truckin'

If it's any consolation to Wol-
verine hockey fans, the icers'
fourth place finish was in North
America's t o u g h e s t collegiate
hockey league.
This was proven beyond a doubt
last weekend when Denver and
North Dakota placed one-two in
the NCAA championship tourney
at Duluth.
Undaunted by the publicity of
pre-tournament favorite Cornell,
the WCHA's third place finisher
North Dakota, whipped the Red-
men 3-1, in the semi-finals Friday
night.
Denver then captured its fourth
NCAA hockey crown by white-
washing the Sioux 4-0, in the
finals Saturday after disposing of
Boston College, 4-1, the night be-
fore.
The hero of the Denver effort
was junior netminder Gerry Pow-
ers who yielded only a single tally
in the championship competition
and was named the tournament's
Most Valuable Player.
It is a shame that the sched-
uling didn't enable Wolverine fans
to get a look at Denver. Led by an
awesome combination of defense
and goalkeeping, the Pioneers add-
ed a fast crop of forwards and put
together one of the finest clubs in
WCHA history.
Rearguards Keith Magnuson and
Tim Gould in front of Powers
formed an almost impregnable wall
reminiscent of the Montreal Cana-
diens in the days of Doug Harvey,
Tom Johnson and Jacques Plante.
The Pioneers ended their season
riding the crest of a 22-game win
streak after opening the season
with a mediocre 6-5-1 mark.
Wolverine fans may well be able
to see an even better Denver team
next season, however, as Coach
Murray Armstrong's graduation
losses number only three.
There could be a dynasty in the
making.
-ELLIOTT BERRY

PUCK WINDUP

- --Bob Lees_

TURNING POINT
QUARTERBACK DENNIS BROWN begins a rollout against Michigan State last season. He took
over the signal-calling duties in the second half of this game, and was awarded the starting slot
in the following game against Indiana, a position he never relinquished.

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!
. NO WAITING
* 7 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

A n Introduction:
Let it be sring ...
The Daily is going rampant with esotericism-and the debut of
this column may seem to carry that fact to the point of absurdity. With
such a thought in mind, I fully intended to celebrate the inauguration
. of The Truckin' MOLIMO with an explanation of the varied and com-
plete meaning of the title.
But something happened this weekend.
Spring came to Ann Arbor.
And, though you may be reading these thoughts through
bleary eyes over a second cup of coffee, I am penning them with
the memories of a dream which I experienced, for two days, in all
its glorious color and beauty. And because a celebration of the
wonderfulness of nature is part of the rich definition of the title
above, I feel justified-and satisfied-in meandering on with
my impressions.
It was when I woke up-late-on Saturday, the usual distaste
for a prospective afternoon at the UGLI already gnawing away with-
in me, that I realized that Ann Arbor had pulled a fast one again.
A week of cold and wind, rain and snow, had climaxed in a torrential
downpour Friday night-yet all this fury had disappeared before the
face of a gentle breeze, a blue sky, and a warming sun. Only with
utmost reluctance did I pull myself away from the place which had
served as shelter and comfort the night before, and which now held
me in another embrace. With grim determination I grasped my books,
heaved a sigh, trudged my way into the UGLI, took a look around . ;
... And walked right out again.
The Diag was renascently alive that afternoon. We sat there
beneath the sun-and 'we' included representatives of all the
various student 'factions'-lazily blowing bubbles like little kids,
or watching three guys play frisbee, or just talking. We laughed
as a blond-haired, blue-eyed 16-month old played in some water,
then with. a dog-and we remembered the days when we too
s thought the world was 'mud-lucious and puddle-wonderful.' And
we smiled, and we opened ourselves to the world's beauty-and for
once the world didn't slam us shut again.
Yet it grew cool as the sun slid behind Angell, and after awhile
the Diag began to empty in clusters of threes and fours. Dinner-
time was drawn-out, lengthy but relaxing, and suddenly it was night
again.
W This time there was no rain. The fury was of a different sort, and
when morning broke even more poignantly than the day before, there
was the barest pretense that the UGLI would draw us into her
soporific web. An hour of sunning outside, books in hands, moreover,
drove that intruding thought completely away. We left our pens and
pages hurriedly, and took off searching for we-weren't-sure-what.
We found it in Michigan Stadium.
The Big Bowl, home of powerhouse football and overwhelming
crowds, was empty this March Sunday-empty of spinning cheer-
leaders and halfback options and "The Victors." But it was full
anyway, as a few couples lay here and there, while other people
took pictures or flew kites or played frisbee or just strolled through
the bright stands. For' awhile we were content just to walk bare-
foot along the squishy turf with each other, but then five little
girls came dashing out from the runway, and we were caught up
in a wirldwind of freeze tag and foot races. We tired quickly,
though, and soon we had our shoes back on and headed back...
The world of papers and meetings and assignments was now be-
ginning to thrust itself forward past the failing sun's rays, and it
didn't take long before we once again grasped our trusty Bics to return
to the U. The routine has now firmly reestablished itself . . . but for
awhile, for nearly two whole days, it had relaxed its grip.
And all of us are a little freer because of that.
Students for
McCARTHY
will hold an important meeting TOMORROW, March 20,
to discuss plans for the March 22 rally at Detroit Metro
airport and the March 29 trip to Wisconsin to work in
cCarthy's campaign.
7:30 P.M. in Colloquium Room of Physics-Astronomy
0 Building (on 2nd floor of 2-story wing)

most as hard as the offense.
While both ends are returning,
the whole center of the line grad-
uated.
Returning ends are Phil Sey-
mour and Jon Kramer. Defensive

KANSAS ALSO WINS:
St. Peter's Upsets Duke

tackles Dave Porter, Tom Goss,
Dick Williamson, and Dennis
Monthei all graduated. Two of the
linebackers, Dennis Morgan and
Rocky Rosema, both are gone, but
junior Tom Stincic returns to the
third position.
Cecil Pryor, .a sophomore who
was injured last season, is ex-
pected to fill in one of the holes.
Two freshmen, Tim Killian and
Ralph Huff, are also being con-
sidered for spots.
Tom Curtis, who led the Big
Ten in interceptions, is the back-
bone of the pass defense. He plays
safety with Jerry Hartman while.

George Hoey and Brian Healy fill
in the cornerback positions.
Sorting Process
"As is every year, slring prac-
tice is used to sort out the players
and find out where we'll need
help," explains Elliott. "Nobody's
position is considered permanent
and very few positions are in-
sured."
The schedule for spring prac-
tice is rather monotonous. Prac-
tice will take place each day all
week with a scrimmage each Sat-
urday. The last day of practice,
April 13, will feature an inter-
squad game in the stadium.

B
U
C
K
E
T

D
R
V
E

NEW YORK QP)-Upstart St.
St. Peter's N.J., quick as a wink,
shifted into high gear at the start
and left tall, slow, and foul-
plagued Duke standing 100-71 last
night in the National Invitation
Basketball Tournament.
In the first game of the quarter-
final doubleheader at Madison
Square Garden, Kansas took ad-
vantage of Villanova's cold second
half to overcome the Wildcats
55-49.
St. Peter's will meet Kansas in
the semifinals Thursday night.
St. Peter's, playing before an un-
believing record NIT crowd of
19,500, ran full tilt to a 15-3 lead
behind Elnardo Webster, and Duke
never came closer than six points
again.
Webster, playing with four fouls
after 17 minutes had 10 of those
first 15 points and had 21 aththe
half when the Peacocks lead 50-29,
The Blue Devils, which has held
opponents to an average of only
66 points during the season, added
to its own woes when two of its
NHL Standings

big men, Mike Lewis and Joe Ken-
nedy, got into early foul trouble.
Kansas, making its debut in the
NIT, had a big height advantage
over the Wildcats in the battle
between two of the top defensive
teams in the country, but Vil-
lanova's speed and perfect execu-
tion grabbed command midway
through the first half, taking a
31-25 intermission lead.
Then the Wildcats went almost
six minutes into the second half
without a point as deliberate Kan-
sas scored the first 11 points of
the final session.
When Sammy Sims finally hit
a field goal for Villanova, Kansas
led 36-33 and increased the mar-
gin to 37-36 before Johnny Jones
hit Villanova's next field goal al-
most eight minutes later.
SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Pittsburgh 7, Detroit 2
Cincinnati 5, New York, (N), 2
Houston 6, Oakland 4, 11 innings
Chicago, (A), 5, Baltimore 1
St. Louis 8, Philadelphia 7
Mexico City Reds 5, New York
(A) 3
NBA'
Philadelphia 158, Los Angeles 128
ABA
New Jersey 113, Houston 103
Pittsburgh 135, Anaheim 118
Denver. 108, New Orleans 101

u
A
C's

uSKIT

announces open petitioning
for '68-'69 Central Committee
Director Assistant Chairman
Musical Director

Treasurer
Publ icity
Secretary
Coordinating Artist
Tickets & Ushers
Promotions
Communications

Technical Director
Set Designer
Stage Manager
Lighting Designer
Costumes
Make-up
Props

FOR THE
CHILDREN'S
COMMUNITY
THURSDAY,
MARCH 21
YEA
KIDS

NHL
East Division
W L T Pts.
Montreal 39 20 10 88
New York 34 22 12 80
Boston 35 24 10 80
Chicago 32 21 15 79
Toronto 28 29 10 66
Detroit 25 32 11 61
Western Division
Philadelphia 29 28 11 69
Los Angeles 29 31 8 66
St. Louis 24 28 15 63
Minnesota 25 30 11 63
Pittsburgh 22 33 12 56
Oakland 15 40 14 45

GF
216
204
241
201
184
225
163
181
160
171
171
143

GA
147
168
201
191
165
233
164
209
171
208
201
202

Petitions available at MUSKET office, 2nd floor Union
All petitions due by 5 P.M., Saturday, March 23
Interviews for directors and assistant chairman March 24-26
Interviews for all other positions March 27-March 29

IKLH
Now in Stock .. .
Model 27 Receiver
Model 1 1 FM on SALE
HI FI STUDIO
121 West Washington
Ph. 668-7942

i

I

Today's Games
No games scheduled.
Tomorrow's Games
No games scheduled.

BUYA MIGHTY MG MIDGET
-w At our
midget
,price tag.

A MIGHTYGOOD DEAL
ALLAROUND

11

MG Midget:
another action car
from the sign
Sof the Octagon.

§
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$ 1 00 GIRLS' $1500& 170
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Need we say§
§ INDIANMOCCMWEE4UIE
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Keep

in touch with

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7:59 A.M. to 12:57 A.M.
Monday thru Friday
n.,,, A LU ,.1.,S AM

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